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Found 59 results

  1. Explored with 2 non members Well this was a fun explore, we didn't know which building it was so we ended up walking around the entire site getting zapped by electric fences which was hilarious to say the least and almost eaten by horses in the neighbouring field before getting in touch with NK who was kind enough to point us in the right direction, all in all it was a good laugh
  2. Having passed Park Hill Flats countless times over the past 18 year or so I've always fancied getting up on the roof so after managing to miss out on a trip here earlier in the year there was no way I was passing this opportunity up, especially with the knowledge of the access tunnels underneath. Visited with a few members from another forum Site History In the nineteenth century the Park Hill area was made up of old quarries, untidy waste ground, steep alleyways and some of the worst slums in Sheffield. This densely populated area consisted of 2 or 3 storey back-to-back housing around central courtyards. Often there would be just one standpipe for around a hundred people. This, combined with the lack of any proper sewage system, allowed diseases such as typhus, dysentry and cholera to ravage the area. In 1864 back to back housing of this type was prohibited. During the 1870's Sheffield Corporation built drains and sewers through the city. Although originally the untreated raw sewage was sent directly into the rivers, at least the sanitation within the housing areas like Park Hill was improved. During the 1880's the provision of water supplies passed from a private company to the corporation and the first sewage treatment plant was built. Slum clearance began in the 1930’s but was halted by the 2nd World War. By the time the issue was reassessed in 1953, a radical solution was needed. This took the shape of Park Hill Flats, built between 1957 and 1960. The unique design was based on an idea by French architect Le Corbusier of creating ‘Streets in the Sky’. The 995 flats were built on top of a 1:10 gradient making them range from 4 storeys high at the top end to 13 storeys at the end nearest the city centre. This layout allowed nearly all of the decks to reach ground at some point, meaning milk floats and other services could access them. The community feel of the previous traditional streets was recreated where possible by rehousing neighbours next to each other. Park Hill Flats attracted worldwide attention and were praised for their innovative design. In December 1998 Park Hill Flats became Grade 2* listed giving it equal status to the Turret House at Sheffield Manor Lodge and making it the largest listed building in Europe. History lifted straight from Sheff Council Website Well after a comical start of 6 blokes attempting to squeeze through a gap that clearly wasn't made for anyone to get through and dodging secca we somehow arrived in the service tunnels, well the others finally did when they chose the right route (Adam) Once we were all in we made our way out of the dimly lit entrance almost crawling through what felt like a good 1/4 mile of tunnel until we could finally stand, this completely threw my sense of where feck we were on the site as there were too many corners to take note of. As we moved through going up and down ladders to different levels in the tunnels it was obvious some of the waste pipes had leaked in the past so we made our best attempts not to stand in the puddles. Around a corner and at the end of the tunnel there was light once again. The pipework in this section looked a lot more modern. Although some of the electrics didn't... Quickly pose for a group shot and we're back on our way A quick attempt was made to enter the service tunnels in the renovated section but ended in fail so we headed up on to the roof The vertical service shafts are seriously confined, but at least if you slip you'll not be far from the ladder and more likely to get wedged than fall to the bottom. Finally on the roof, what I'd been waiting for! Luckily the views from the roof we got to were better than those from the renovated section Finally finishing with another group shot with what looks like almost all of us in it. Really enjoyed this, a nice change. Cheers all who came along
  3. Thanks to Frink for this one.. Last time we visited wp there was just a few villas left not stripped didnt know this was still here till Frink posted up so would be rude not to pop in while we where going to be not that far away anyways.. Vistied with Obsurity,St0rm Stealth and UrbanGinger My take on what is left Thanks for looking
  4. The place is now stripped and well past repair but still the old girl has character. SK
  5. Couple of weeks ago myself, Obscurity, Wevsky and Space Invader ended up in the area, so we thought it'd be rude not to pop in and have a quick look round at what's left. So yeah, there's still a bit left, but it is very fast being stripped out and torn down. Soon all that will remain of this once vast collection of buildings is the water tower and the Admin block. Goodbye Westpark, it's been nice exploring you.
  6. Ive been meaning to visit this for a while and on the way back from London with the guys the opportunity presented itself, Opened in 2001 With Public Money and a contribution of 2.0 Million from the Lottery Council the site 210 acre site closed in 2003 due to much confusion caused by the then roadworks and expansion of the M2 in that area, the current owners of the site are in receivership and still caught up in a legal wrangle over new ownership ! The site was unfortunately severely trashed by an Illegal rave on New years Eve 2008 and was considered as a training camp for the 2012 Olympics Visited with SpaceInvader, Wevsky and Obscurity, and so on with some Pics Accomodation for the surrounding complex What I can only assume is some kind of workshop And some interior shots Thanks for taking the time to check out my report, Ill apologise for the quality of the pics. taken with my TZ5 point and shoot due to time restraints, If your'e considering taking a look yourself dont be fooled by the deceitful and apparant tranquility of the place, security turned up in no time at all !
  7. Skeleton Key and myself set off to London for an explore that we had tried a fortnight earlier and failed to gain access. We had an hour or so to burn before darkness and I remembered a derelict chapel that I had seen a week or so before. Tottenham Park Cemetery is a small private burial ground dating from 1912. At the near the bottom wall sits this beautiful derelict chapel Couldn't really find much in the way of history on the internet apart from this strange piece.... On the night of Halloween 1968 a graveyard desecration by persons unknown occurred at Tottenham Park Cemetery in London. These persons arranged flowers taken from graves in circular patterns with arrows of blooms pointing to a new grave, which was uncovered. A coffin was opened and the body inside "disturbed". But their most macabre act was driving an iron stake in form a cross though the lid and into the breast of the corpse. The source is the London Evening News, 2 November 1968 The entrance to the chapel had a burnt out and presumably stolen car wedged in through the doors
  8. Where to start! Obviously I won't bore you with history as it is all over this forum. We arrived here a bit late from London after having a nightmare on the trains, so we knew we had a bit of a flying visit due to the lack of daylight - although the clocks going forward helped us out! Managed to see a lot, including the tower and the padded cell. On the way out it got dark very fast, and the walkways and buildings can be very disorienting, especially when there are sagging/nonexistent floors all over the place. We were trying to get into the building we got in through, but we were in the one next to it, so coming back into the covered walkway a security guard who spoke very broken English and carried a large plank of wood caught us. We were walked to the nearest exit and waited with him and his partner until the police arrived. Won't go into that, but we got a lift to Epsom station! So not too bad. This is not a good place to be in the dark, mainly because you need to see where you are going, but also because security tend to be a lot more suspicious, and your torchlight gives you away! Pictures 1. 2. Grass on the first floor. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 9.5. 10. 10.5. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Oliver GT. 18. 19. 20. 21.