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Found 70 results

  1. A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
  2. This is the newer of the buildings on this site. Only the foundations of the original building remain after it was burnt down shortly after this building was completed. Sadly there is planning for it to be demolished and rebuilt the planning has changed recently to a smaller building due to lack of interest. How ever I have recently learned a full restoration progress is being taken on. I have also seen images of a dancing bear which was a popular attraction back in the day. My first explore with company. A good job as I would not of got in like the others who have gone recently. Through sheer determination of the lady that went with me we found a way in. Yes we did get stung a lot! This is an amazing place but really is in a bad state. Big thanks to Zee!!!!!! Ground floor First floor Second floor A Bed Of Light by darbians, on Flickr
  3. A sunny winters day on the Jurassic Coast - drinking coffee, murdering bacon sandwiches and hunting for concrete - top day! One of our targets was Studland bay, where once upon a time the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower along with General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten congregated to witness the largest live ammunition practice of the entire war - a full-scale rehearsal for the invasion of Europe and thousands took part - they watched from Fort Henry a demonstration of carpet bombing, followed by an assault landing by troops, a truly momentous occasion. Alas, history over, here are some pictures: Fort Henry - a lookout for the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower, General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten. Inside Dragons teeth - anti-tank defences The area of Studland bay was also heavily fortified - here is one of the gun emplacements. The bolts that mounted the gun, set within the concrete. Inside it's magazine. ... and finally, a pillbox (i won't bore you with the others) - i do wonder if this one will last another 70 years though!
  4. This battery was constructed to house six 9 inch guns on high angle mounts (70 degrees) which would fire heavy projectiles upto ten thousand yards down onto the deck of ships attacking the harbour of Portland. The guns were directed by Position Finding Cells, two at Priory Corner on West Cliff and four on East Cliff. Magazine entrance - feeding the guns by rail and delivering the shells at muzzle height. Two storage buildings. Bombproof shelter. Another magazine and the rail still remains. Bombproof shelter and laboratory entrance. ... and that's the lot!
  5. Few pics from St Martins, nice little shelter, could also be known as the nutcracker! Sorry pretty crappy pics! Frosty.
  6. It was my Father's birthday... so i took him down to Plymouth and over to Drake Island as a present... in an 8ft dinghy! It's a fantastic place, steeped in history from way back in 1135 and this is worth a read - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake%27s_Island. Sorry the pictures lack quality, the majority were taken with a camera phone but that's another story, alas, here are a few... The target. The approach. Barracks. Seagull spotter. Cartridge Lift. My shorts were on and the chicken legs on show. Old meets new... Napoleonic fortification with WWII addition. Waves crashing against the island, over and over with spray coating the pillbox, day in and day out. Up top on the centre battery, looking back towards the barracks with Plymouth in the distance. Where things went... boom! ... and last but by no means least, more guns!
  7. When I got my fisheye, and as I am from Norfolk one of the first photos I took with it was a tractor! I was quite pleased with the results so I thought I would have a wander about this site. All are processed from 3 handheld bracketed images. I know a bit lazy. Sorry there seems to be a bit of a formula to the images but I hope you enjoy. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  8. Russia Soviet Sub Dec - 2012

    I think this was the most scariest thing i have ever done. A late night splore on a Russian sub. It involved knee deep mud and a dingy ride with one and a half oars. But Trog and SK done an amazing job. The sub itself was amazing, im glad i didn't bottle it but inside was so claustrophobic, i really dont know how people stay down there for so long. Splored with SK, Trog and peaches. Thanks for looking
  9. I got the chance to see this place with SK, and it was amazing. With the most gorgeous chimney's and fire places i have ever seen. I could have just moved right in. Thanks SK for the external shot Thanks for looking
  10. visited with oliver GT and rustproofhawk ... After trying to see as much of Belgium as we could in four days, we all decided that im power station would be high on the list . The size of this place is immense and i found myself putting my tripod down wondering round and absorbing as much of the place as possible ive been back twice to this site and shots are from all three trips my apologies for not being able to find any history ... on with the pics ... IM POWER STATION control room... the cooling tower ... thanks for looking
  11. We all know and love this place so thought ide throw a few of my little pics up ..ive left the big angles out ..splored with Ps as always a memorable weekend in many ways..especially the magic mushrooms on the motorway.. hope you enjoy the pics... After doing PS,S head in with my tourettes all day i decided to irritate him more by seeing if he could drive with welly vision....... His answer was..."it looks a bit weird anyway, not sure i should of eaten them mushrooms i found in the grass at barnsleys, like pretty stripey car lights"...big grin,,.... Happy dazzzzzzze!
  12. I've had my eye on this for a while, looks like once they got going, they hit it hard cos now, well, its ruined. I'm going to start a campaign, Urbexorzzzz againzzzzt developerzzzzzz! HANDS OF OUR DERPS! A clip from the local news a few years ago gives the info. 'Most of the outpatient services will be moving to nearby Acre Mill along with antenatal services and back room offices. The concern is the hospital will run short of beds as the ageing population rises and hospital bosses say the move would mean they could run a more “efficient and effective� service. The plans were revealed at a Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust board meeting yesterday. The Z block at Acre Mills opposite the hospital will be redesigned to integrate primary and secondary care, community and social care into more of a one-stop service. Director of service development at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust Lesley Hill said: “This plan will require quite a significant re-design but we want patient experience to improve and staff satisfaction to improve. Read more: Examiner http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-we ... 2NEyWW8aX' Again, no carpets, but this times we had lights, randomly placed outside lift shafts.... Anyway, visited with drinkinbud andbeardythewierdy, I wouldn't really recommend anyone else bothers LOL. Some bugger around here loves the 2 tone paint job, it's in all the mills! It had a corridor. A room. Some more rooms. One had a wheelbarrow. And a corridor on the way out. First in I think, not bloody worth it. LOL!
  13. UK Springfield Brewery 2012

    Part of our Brummy adventures took us here..very iconic in its day but rather a state now and development has started..but it was the end of a great day with PS and we passed her so thought it rude not too really probably the best part of it was being shocked by a massive security man hiding in the undergrowth...who very kindly escorted usthrough the gates.how releived was i! the thought of the 10ft wall was not appealing and PS starting to worry about another kick on the swede from me was dawning in his eyes...not many pics but if stuck at a loose end worth a peep...
  14. explored with... wevsky ,obscuirty ,stealh2k12,fortknoxo,urbanginger and six riff raff a little history ... This is a large and interesting complex, located at the northern end of a tight triangular junction with the Sheerness-on-Sea branch. First proposed in 1969, the construction of Sheerness Steel Works was given the go-ahead in 1971, building work beginning in that September on land largely occupied by Army playing fields. The building cost was priced at £10,000,000 (£105,921,790 at 2008 prices), and included swallowing up a goods yard recently made redundant by British Rail. The works, a private venture under Canadian ownership, commenced operation in November 1972, and was designed to recycle scrap cars into steel coils and rods. The latter were for use in reinforced concrete and the steel mill had the capacity to process 180,000 tons of scrap metal per annum. It was envisaged that the mill’s yearly capacity could be increased to 400,000 tons within four years and, indeed, an additional £5,000,000 was invested in the works in 1975 to meet this target. Steel was produced using the electric arc process, and the mill remained a profitable venture until the second half of 1980. Much of the scrap metal dealt with originated from Mayer Parry Recycling of Erith, this being shipped down the Thames. Scrap metal and finished steel were also carried to and from the works by rail, and for this operation, new wagon batches – tailor-made for this type of traffic – were produced by ''Procor''. The rolling stock was leased by the steel mill at a time when there were few privately-owned wagons running on British Rail; indeed, this was one of a small number of works which was not part of the nationalized British Steel. For many years the Sheerness Steel Mill was owned and operated by Canadian-based ''Co-Steel'', but with this company's struggling finances, it was sold to ASW Holdings Limited of Cardiff, Wales after a deal was finalized in December 1998. The latter could only keep the operation going until July 2002, the company subsequently going into receivership on 10th of that month - the end seemed nigh for the works. And in January 2003, Sheerness Steel was taken over by Thamesteel... on with the pics... thanks for looking
  15. The House Of Tears...this place has been a labour of love and hate on occasions...Those who recognise her will know the history and the tragedy that runs throughout her walls..she is simply stunning to walk around in knowing that some of our legends of music have stayed there also made it even more of a truley amazing place to be...after seeing a post on her a couple of years ago and her getting battoned down faster than lightening i decided to hunt her down and give her a whirl back in september..lady luck shone that day and we got the whole afternoon to wander about her..i know the tourist trail hit her very quickly and no doubt youve seen her already, but heres my take on a magnificant building slowly being preserved.. splored with Perjury Saint i hope you enjoy her as we did...
  16. This is another one of those that Ive been meaning to do for a while and despite having been in the Drop Postern a couple of times I never took any pics, well until now , Theres a massive amount of history about the general area and fortifications that surround it here http://www.subterraneanhistory.co.uk/20 ... dover.html Visited with Porky Porkster, The Chop Explorer A few Pics ; Drop First Looking down the staircase At the Bottom Hospital Next Bit of a squeeze this Looking back up These Extremely well preserved doors at the bottom A few exterior shots Porkster doing er, I dont know really And some random car bits rotting away in the elements All in all a very relaxed mooch, Thanks to Pork Chop for showing me where Hospital Postern was
  17. Having passed Park Hill Flats countless times over the past 18 year or so I've always fancied getting up on the roof so after managing to miss out on a trip here earlier in the year there was no way I was passing this opportunity up, especially with the knowledge of the access tunnels underneath. Visited with a few members from another forum Site History In the nineteenth century the Park Hill area was made up of old quarries, untidy waste ground, steep alleyways and some of the worst slums in Sheffield. This densely populated area consisted of 2 or 3 storey back-to-back housing around central courtyards. Often there would be just one standpipe for around a hundred people. This, combined with the lack of any proper sewage system, allowed diseases such as typhus, dysentry and cholera to ravage the area. In 1864 back to back housing of this type was prohibited. During the 1870's Sheffield Corporation built drains and sewers through the city. Although originally the untreated raw sewage was sent directly into the rivers, at least the sanitation within the housing areas like Park Hill was improved. During the 1880's the provision of water supplies passed from a private company to the corporation and the first sewage treatment plant was built. Slum clearance began in the 1930’s but was halted by the 2nd World War. By the time the issue was reassessed in 1953, a radical solution was needed. This took the shape of Park Hill Flats, built between 1957 and 1960. The unique design was based on an idea by French architect Le Corbusier of creating ‘Streets in the Sky’. The 995 flats were built on top of a 1:10 gradient making them range from 4 storeys high at the top end to 13 storeys at the end nearest the city centre. This layout allowed nearly all of the decks to reach ground at some point, meaning milk floats and other services could access them. The community feel of the previous traditional streets was recreated where possible by rehousing neighbours next to each other. Park Hill Flats attracted worldwide attention and were praised for their innovative design. In December 1998 Park Hill Flats became Grade 2* listed giving it equal status to the Turret House at Sheffield Manor Lodge and making it the largest listed building in Europe. History lifted straight from Sheff Council Website Well after a comical start of 6 blokes attempting to squeeze through a gap that clearly wasn't made for anyone to get through and dodging secca we somehow arrived in the service tunnels, well the others finally did when they chose the right route (Adam) Once we were all in we made our way out of the dimly lit entrance almost crawling through what felt like a good 1/4 mile of tunnel until we could finally stand, this completely threw my sense of where feck we were on the site as there were too many corners to take note of. As we moved through going up and down ladders to different levels in the tunnels it was obvious some of the waste pipes had leaked in the past so we made our best attempts not to stand in the puddles. Around a corner and at the end of the tunnel there was light once again. The pipework in this section looked a lot more modern. Although some of the electrics didn't... Quickly pose for a group shot and we're back on our way A quick attempt was made to enter the service tunnels in the renovated section but ended in fail so we headed up on to the roof The vertical service shafts are seriously confined, but at least if you slip you'll not be far from the ladder and more likely to get wedged than fall to the bottom. Finally on the roof, what I'd been waiting for! Luckily the views from the roof we got to were better than those from the renovated section Finally finishing with another group shot with what looks like almost all of us in it. Really enjoyed this, a nice change. Cheers all who came along
  18. Explored with 2 non members Hubberstone Fort Scoverton Fort
  19. I don't know a lot of the history on this place,i know it closed down around 1993. Explored with 3 non members
  20. Explored with one other non member, Well what a wonderful place this is, It is full of amazing features that gave it the wow factor, Its a shame its been left to fall apart really wish the owner would do something to save it
  21. UK RAF Chilmark Dec 2012

    Explored with 2 non members Walked around for almost 3 hours with a hangover trying to find the entrance to this place
  22. 'The Waterloo' A grade 2 listed edwardian hostelry founded in 1908, The Waterloo has the most beautiful tiles throughout, wonderfully ornate not the sort of decoration you find in pubs these days. It became renowned for its downstairs Grill Room complete with its coke fired open grill, said to be the best place for a steak in Birmingham! It has just been sold for £150,000 and the new owners say they are keen to restore it to its former glory... lets hope so as it would be a crying shame to see this amazing interior lost. splored with my besty perjury saint...
  23. I nicknamed this "Squeal Like A Pig Cottage" because it seriously reminded me of a set from Deliverance A nice relaxed mooch with Skeleton Key, Bobo and J.R.Hartley
  24. Yes i hear you cry another cdc report..it's been hit a fair bit i know but as we had just left the pre metro we thought as we where in the area that we would pop in.Weather was bleak not an easy task trying to expose anything properly in that light but ive cobbled a few together that weren't that bad!! Visited with Obscurity,Spaceinvader and Urbanginer That was out 15 hour flying visit to BE..home in time for tea!!
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