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Found 82 results

  1. I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  2. So, after discovering a thread I convinced my camera club that Loudon would be worth a wee visit. We set off this evening to explore and take some photos. Remarkably easy to get in, despite the big gate - it was just a matter of walking around the outside of the gate and then up to driveway to the castle. That's it really - you have complete access to the site. To be honest it appears to be far from abandoned - in fact it is very well looked after. The grass is mown and everything appears to be largely undamaged. Many of the rides have been taken down and removed but there was still a fair bit to see. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.
  3. Lier Mental Hospital, Norway Built 1921, 5 buildings closed 1985 the Interior was removed 2010. Demolition started Autumn 2013 and the Photos from july 2013, from just one of the buildings. The Hospital area still has several buildings in full use. r I think I finally got it now. You can see the photos, right? Hope you like them
  4. Hello, I have had this on my list for a long time and after a few messages we arranged a meet. Access was piss easy and we didn't see anyone or security. got lost loads of times inside and found the famous white room show flat but couldn't find access to the other control room. A revisit is on the cards i think. On our exit we found our original entry point had been sealed! Must be a magician Secca! Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London. On 7 June 2012 it was sold to SP Setia and Sime Darby. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17.
  5. Evening all, I'm sure that its OK to post in here now considering the amount of people that are doing it lately? If not, please move and accept my apologies. I'll try not to bog down the post with too many photos, as I have a lot more to go and a lot on Flickr. Lots of detail shots in with these. I decided that I needed to do this, apart from a handful in the UK, I've not done much in this country this year. After help from some fellow explorers (you know who you are) I decided that a day off work was in order and a drive from sunny South Wales to London in the early evening was on the cards. In the meantime, I arranged to meet with Dursty, a fellow member of the OS forum and community who kindly took me to B and we did the roof together. On arriving and making it to the site and negotiating my way to control room A, I spent some time in here and worked pretty quickly for me, swopping between lenses and making the most out of the early part of the explore. Once Dursty arrived, we did Control Room B and climbed up to the base of the chimneys to get that awesome skyline. Some history Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance in Take That's music video "The Flood." In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure. Built in the early 1930s, this iconic structure, with its four distinctive chimneys, was created to meet the energy demands of the new age. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott – the man who also designed what is now Tate Modern and brought the red telephone box to London – was hired by the London Power Company to create this first of a new generation of ‘superstations’, with the building beginning to produce power for the capital in 1933. With dimensions of 160 m x 170 m, the roof of the boiler house 50 m tall, and its four 103 m tall, tapering chimneys, it is a truly massive structure. The building in fact comprised two stations – Battersea ‘A’ and Battersea ‘B’, which were conjoined when the identical B section was completed in the 1950s, and it was the world’s most thermally efficient building when it opened. But Battersea Power Station was – and is – so much more besides. Gilbert Scott lifted it from the prosaic into the sublime by incorporating lavish touches such as the building’s majestic bronze doors and impressive wrought-iron staircase leading to the art deco control room. Here, amongst the controls which are still in situ today, those in charge of London’s electricity supply could enjoy the marble-lined walls and polished parquet flooring. Down in the turbine hall below, meanwhile, the station’s giant walls of polished marble would later prompt observers to liken the building to a Greek temple devoted to energy. Over the course of its life, Battersea Power Station has been instilled in the public consciousness, not least when Pink Floyd famously adopted it for its Animals album cover and launch in 1977. As a result of its popularity, a great deal of energy has been expended in protecting this landmark. Following the decommissioning of the ‘A’ station in 1975, the whole structure was listed at Grade II in 1980 before, in 1983, the B station was also closed. Since that time, and following the listing being upgraded to a Grade II* status in 2007, Battersea Power Station has become almost as famous for plans heralding its future as for its past. Until now, that is. The transformation of Battersea Power Station – this familiar and much-loved silhouette on the London skyline – is set to arrive, along with the regeneration and revitalisation of this forgotten corner of central London. History is about to be made once more. Getting out in the early hours after a good 5 hours in here and then driving home. Glad I made it to this place to see for myself. On with some photos. A side B side External Thanks for looking in. Tim
  6. Well here we go, I’ve wanted to crack this for a few years but never got round to it, and once again Northern_Ninja came to my aid. So to help my continuing depression and sadness, I decided a trip here was on the cards. We planned to go the following evening, but with meal plans disrupted we decided to make it into a last minute road trip. I arrived at the Ninjas HQ at about 7:30pm and off to London we went in my small run around Punto armed with a stove, frying pan and sleeping bags. After a short drive we were finally there. We did the run across no mans land, through all the mud and crap and straight into A-side. For me; it did not disappoint. So many photographic wonders right in the centre of London. We spent a good few hours inside A-side before heading for the roof and getting some shots of the chimneys (it would be rude not to!), where I kindly received some help taking night time shots. After that we went straight up the scaffold on one of the chimneys. It was wet, cold, and quite scary, but totally wonderful at the top. I went about shooting my pictures of London and Battersea from the base of a chimney, which I shamelessly hugged for about 30 seconds. For me, Battersea was a bit of a milestone! After this, we headed down back into A-side and made the quick dash to B-side, where we spent the best part of an hour. It wasn’t as good in here, but still amazing nonetheless. Remember, here it is about the history of the place, and the purpose it served. From here, we went across onto the pier and checked out the cranes. The pigeons inside the internal ladder behind the operators cab thwarted our progress, but we admired the views from halfway up nonetheless. After Battersea we enjoyed sausage and bacon baps, cooked by Northern_Ninja under a railway bridge at 2:30am. We drove through Central London to West Silvertown where we slept uncomfortably in the back of the car, with only the view of Millennium Mills to keep us company. Busted within five minutes sadly in MM, but a good night before made up for that. P.S. I am a big Pink Floyd fan! Taken from SirJonnyPs report, probably harvested off Wiki! First of all, sorry about the amount of piccies!
  7. I wasn't going to bother putting up a report anywhere on this, as we got caught by the farmer and he's pretty fed up with people going onto his land to photograph it, he actually asked us not to post the images on the net anywhere. To be fair I can understand as it must be quite exasperating for him to keep telling trespassers to bugger off, and he is after all only going about his business. So not wanting to encourage too many visits, I'll stick it in private so it doesn't really count. If anyone does go seeking this out, don't park outside the gate with the big 'private land keep off' sign. School boy error, it's pretty obvious why you're there. Go park a distance away and walk to it. The history is borrowed from another report on another forum, as there's really not much info out there about it. Colin Stokes was a local eccentric artist who began building a barn for his sheep in the 1980s. It started out as a single storey shed, but within a decade it had spread upwards and outwards into a hocus-pocus tangle of towers, turrets and arches. It was originally small enough not to need planning permission, but the council eventually told him he had to stop. However by this point he had hidden it from them for ten years, and it had grown so massive it's basically as large as a house. This was in the 1990s. Colin moved to Scotland soon after, and since then, the "shed" (if you can call it that, it's certainly the best shed I've ever seen!) has been left empty and open to all weathers. But it's remote location, and the fact that Colin put a lot of effort into making sure it was built to last means it is unusually intact. It really is an intriguing little place. I only got a couple of quite poor exteriors as I was meaning to take some more on the way back, but of course we got seen before that happened. This one has a Frosty in it for scale. As you can see, this part is approximately 1 1/2 frosty's high. And some of the stained glass is beautiful. It's amazing that this survives in the middle of the countryside like this, was very surreal. Thanks for looking, Mike.
  8. Yes, it's another Battersea report! Well it had to be done really, I've put it off long enough, what with stories of ruthless security and a guaranteed night in the cells if you got caught, the place being like a maze if you didn't know it well, the chances of actually getting across no-mans-land unseen being slim and finding yourself in the control rooms even slimmer, it just never seemed worth it. Now with development starting, it seems security have got rather lax and Battersea has opened its doors to practically any explorer who can be bothered to climb over the fence. I'd be gutted if I never saw it, so it had to be done. See frosty's report for a more detailed write up of our evenings trip, he's pretty much nailed it. It was tons of fun, and we spent waaaay longer in there than we expected to, so much so that we had to postpone something else we were going to do that night until another day. Please Note, due to large volumes of people, it was tricky to get any shots without people in them. Also please note the gift shop is out of "I've been to battersea" car stickers such is the volume of traffic through here lately Visited with so many people I can't remember, but among them was Frosty and SirJohnnyP who deserves a shout as despite the fact he was a little worse for wear not to mention a bit lost at times, he did guide us mostly round the place and it would have been a lot harder without him. Also shouts to another member who has been more than generous with sharing information on the place, you know who you are. So without further delay I present to you "YABR" (Yet another Battersea Report) starting, as always, with control room 'A' We did a brief visit to the 'white room' a curious mock up of a hotel room in the middle of the place, quite surreal. I didn't bother with any pics, but we chilled there for about half hour, had a fag and watched and episode of danger mouse on youtube. Then control room 'B' this wasn't as big as I expected it to be, but it's still impressive none the less. Yeah it HAD to be done, I know it's not original but I don't care. And after that and much farting around getting back down, we decided the night wouldn't be complete without climbing up to the base of at least one of the stacks, so we picked the North tower of 'A' side and went for it. Unfortunitely it was very windy and spitting with rain so I didn't really get any good pics, I wasn't really that bothered, I just wanted to get up close to one of the famous white chimneys. And that was that, mission accomplished. It's only taken me 6 years to get round to it. Now, anyone else thinking of going just go get it done, it IS worth it despite the millions of reports, you'll regret it if you don't make the effort! Thanks for looking Maniac.
  9. Was a little disappointed in this, but when I saw the chapel my opinion changed.
  10. Sheffield General Cemetery I was in Sheffield and my friend wanted to show me this cemetery so we went and had a look and i must say i really enjoyed walking around even got inside the chapel bonus . I like the history of this place too and enjoyed doing the research here is a few photos i took and some history i got on it. the first pic isnt mine. The General Cemetery was one of the first commercial landscape cemeteries in Britain. Its opening in 1836 as a Nonconformist cemetery was a response to the rapid growth of Sheffield and the relatively poor state of the town's churchyards. The cemetery, with its Greek Doric and Egyptian style buildings, was designed by Sheffield architect Samuel Worth (1779–1870) on the site of a former quarry.[4] Landscaping was managed by Robert Marnock, who also designed Sheffield Botanical Gardens (1836) and Weston Park (1873). The first burial was of Mary Ann Fish, a victim of tuberculosis. An Anglican cemetery was consecrated alongside the Nonconformist cemetery in 1846â€â€the wall that divided the un-consecrated and consecrated ground can still be seen today. By 1916 the cemetery was rapidly filling up and running out of space, burials in family plots continued through the 1950s and 1960s, but by 1978 ownership of the cemetery had passed to Sheffield City Council and it was closed to all new burials. In 1980 the council got permission by Act of Parliament to clear 800 gravestones to make a recreation area. Through the 1980s and 1990s most of the rest of the cemetery was left untouched, becoming overgrown and an important sanctuary for local wildlife. Unfortunately, many of the buildings also fell into disrepair. In early 2003 work began to restore the gatehouse and catacombs funded by a £500,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund The Gatehouse (Grade II listed) is built directly over Porter Brook in classical architecture with Egyptian features. The gateway resembles a Roman arch. It was possibly built over the river so that entering the cemetery was symbolic of the crossing of the river Styx in Greek mythology. The Egyptian Gate (Grade II listed) is the entrance to the cemetery on Cemetery Road. It is richly ornamented and possesses a sculpted gate bearing two coiled snakes holding their tails in their mouths. The Nonconformist chapel (Grade II listed) is built in classical style with Egyptian features. The sculpted panel above the door shows a dove, representing the Holy Ghost or the Holy Spirit. Stone steps lead down to a wall with catacomb-like entrances. The Anglican chapel (added in 1850; Grade II listed). Designed in the Neo-Gothic style by William Flockton. Unlike the other buildings in the cemetery, the chapel was built in Gothic style rather than Classical or Egyptian. The building is distinctive in style due to its ogival windows, the porte-cochere and the spire. The spire is indeed far too big for the rest of the building, built purposely so that it would be seen from afar. The Registrar's house (Grade II listed) The Catacombs. There are two rows of catacombs built into the hillside, this method of burial was unpopular and only ten bodies were laid to rest in the catacombs in the first 10 years. The Dissenters' Wall was built between 1848 and 1850. It divided the older Nonconformist part of the cemetery from the consecrated Anglican ground. The wall runs almost uninterrupted, from the perimeter wall on Cemetery Road to the path beside the Porter Brook at the bottom of the cemetery. George Bassett (1818–1886). Founder of The Bassett Companyâ€â€the company that invented Liquorice Allsorts. Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1876). George Bennett (died 1841). Founder of the Sheffield Sunday School movement. The memorial to him (c.1850) is Grade II listed.[11] John, Thomas, and Skelton Cole. Founders of Sheffield's Cole Brothers department store in 1847â€â€now part of the John Lewis Partnership. Francis Dickinson (1830–1898). One of the soldiers who fought in the Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean war. William Dronfield (1824–1891). Founder of the United Kingdom Alliance of Organised Trades, which inspired the creation of the Trades Union Congress. Mark Firth (25 April 1819–28 November 1880). Steel manufacturer, Master Cutler (1867), Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1874), and founder of Firth College in 1870 (later University of Sheffield). The monument to Mark Firth is Grade II listed,[12] the railings that surround it were made at Firth's Norfolk Works. William Flockton, architect. John Fowler. Father of the designer of the Forth Rail Bridge (also called John). John Gunson (1809–1886). Chief engineer of the Sheffield Water Company at the time of the collapse of Dale Dyke Dam on 11 March 1864, which resulted in the Great Sheffield Flood. Samuel Harrison, who documented the flood, and 77 of the flood's victims are also buried in the cemetery. Samuel Holberry (1816–1842). A leading figure in the Chartist movement. Isaac Ironside (1808–1870). Chartist and local politician. James Montgomery (1771–1854). Poet/Publisher. The grave and Grade II listed monument to James Montgomery, were moved to the grounds of Sheffield Cathedral in 1971.[13] James Nicholson (died 1909). Prominent Sheffield industrialist. The memorial that he commissioned for himself and his family c.1872 is Grade II listed.[14] William Parker, merchant. The monument to William Parker, erected in 1837 by the merchants and manufacturers of Sheffield, is Grade II listed.[15] William Prest (died 1885). Cricketer and footballer born in York, who lived most of his life in Sheffield. Co-founder of Sheffield Football club These are the crypts. aparantly theres been satanic rituals done inside here and night time atracts many um disturbed people. the chapel has been arsoned before (SO annoying drives me crazy!) still a cool explore for me had fun.
  11. Last explore of 2012 brought us to this old Post Office in the middle of Steeltown. I don’t know how long it has been closed but it looks to have been quite some time. There's not that much to see inside but it has some great decay and a cool spiral staircase. Visited with Rusty, Andre Govia & Chard. Here's a few pictures. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13
  12. I'm sure you all know this place first hand, it was a very popular place and it's had a lot of Urbex traffic pass through it. Visited with Rusty on a Sheffield day trip back in September 2011 A real cool old place, I'm not sure of it's current status.
  13. Im not at all religious, in fact im an atheist,but walking round this place made me think twice about things. Ushaw College Ushaw College (St Cuthbert's College, Ushaw) is a Roman Catholic seminary, . It was founded at Douai as the English College, Douai in France in 1568, which moved to Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham in England in 1808 and became a Licensed Hall of the University of Durham in 1968. It is independent of the University but offers courses validated by the University. Both Church and lay students study at the college. In 2002 the College rejected a report from the Roman Catholic hierarchy that it should merge with St Mary's College, Oscott, near Birmingham. In October 2010 it was announced that the college is to close in the summer of 2011 due to the shortage of vocations in the Roman Catholic Church, and that the site is likely to be sold... Some of the college's buildings are no longer used, but some have been converted into a conference centre. The main college buildings are grade II listed, however the College Chapel is grade II* and the Chapel of St Michael is grade I. The Refectory was designed and built by Pugin, as was the original chapel although this was later dismantled and replaced by the present building designed by Dunn and Hansom. The original college buildings (1804�1808) were designed by James Taylor. (College of St. Cuthbert) A combined college and seminary for the six dioceses that were comprised in the old Northern Vicariate of England. The government is vested in a united board of the bishops of these dioceses, with a president, a vice-president, and staff of about 30 professors. The average number of students is over 300, divided into three courses: the preparatory course, including about 80 boys, thehumanity course with about 130, and the philosophical and theological with about 100. History The suppression of the "Grands Anglais" at Douai the seminary which for 200 years had meant the Catholic Faith to England, was only one of the many far-reaching results that the French Revolution brought in its train. The immediate necessity under which the English Catholics found themselves of providing for the continuation of its work led to a project of establishing one college for the whole of England on English soil. Many difficulties supervened and finally the question arranged itself by the division of the refugee students from Douai into two bodies, one of which found shelter at Old Hall near Ware, while the remainder (mainly composed of students who were destined for the Northern Vicariate), after temporary sojourns at Tudhoe and Pontop, two villages in the vicinity of Durham, settled on 15 Oct., 1794, at Crook Hall, about eleven miles N.W. of that city. There they re-established Douai for the north of England, and it lived its life under the guidance of one of its former professors, Thomas Eyre, of John Lingard, the future historian, and of John Daniel, the actual president of Douai at its suppression, who seems to have been formally installed as president for a few days. Ten years' growth made Crook Hall inadequate for its purpose, and in 1804 Bishop William Gibson began the buildings at Ushaw to which four years later, the colony finallymigrated, the first detachment on 19 July, the rest on 2 August, 1808. There they found three sides of a massive quadrangle, with a frontage of about 170 feet and a depth of 220, ready for their habitation. The fourth side of this quadrangle was not added till 1819, under the president who succeeded Eyre in 1811, Dr. John Gillow; but no further material addition was made to the buildings until the fourth president, Charles Newsham, succeeded in 1837. He realized that, if Ushaw was adequately to continue its career, no pains nor expense must be spared to enlarge its capacity and to bring its arrangements into line with more modern requirements. The pioneers of the Gothic revival were at hand to assist him in this, and from the plans of the two Pugins and the two Hansoms the second church with its attendant chapels, the library, infirmary, museum, exhibition hall, lavatories, kitchens, and farm buildings, and a separate establishment for the younger boys, all sprang up around the old Georgian quadrangle. In much more than a convention sense Monsignor Newsham may be called the founder of modern Ushaw; and the best evidence of how far-seeing were his plans and achievements lies in the fact that for twenty years after his death, in 1863, practically no addition was made to the fabric. In 1883 Monsignor Wrennal found it necessary to build a third church. Under Bishop Wilkinson, whoassumed the presidency in 1890, which he held conjointly with the Bishopric of Hexham and Newcastle till his death in 1909, a fresh period of activity began. A covered swimming bath, a gymnasium, two new dormitories, and over forty new living rooms, the enlargement of the exhibition hall, the elaborate decoration of the church with the erection of a new high altar, are all the products of his nineteen years of presidency. Two presidents have held office since his death: Monsignor Joseph Corbishly, who survived him only a year, and Monsignor William Henry Brown, under whom new lecture rooms have been erected to accommodate the largely increased numbers of philosophy and divinity students. Altogether the present blocks of buildings, with their enclosed courts, cover a rectangle 880 feet long by 420 feet broad; the outbuildings, grounds, and campus cover over 100 acres, and the whole estate, with its home and outlying farms, includes between 1200 and 1300 acres. Many objects of historical and artistic interest are preserved in the college. Lingard bequeathed to it all his books and papers, which included an early manuscript and the proof sheets of his "History of England" with about 1500 of his letters; Wiseman is represented by the manuscripts of "Fabiola" and the "Hidden Gem", and of many sermons, lectures, and letters, while Eyre gathered for it a valuable collection of documents dealing with the English Catholic history of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and intended for a continuation of Dodd's "Church History". Thelibrary, in which these are stored, contains about 45,000 volumes, mainly of theological and historical interest. It is especially rich in early printed liturgical books and in seventeenth-century controversy. Examples of Wynken de Worde's "York Manual", Higden's "Polychronicon", the "Nuremburg Chronicle", the "Ulm Cosmographs", the "Complutensian Polyglot", are found on its shelves, and, perhaps more interesting than all, about forty works that belonged to the pre-Reformation library of Durham Abbey and which still retain the original monastic bindings. Visited with Host and Frank, thanks to Bugsuperster..... Thanks for looking Oldskool.........
  14. Ok the ice house opened 1900 closed 1990 ......NO ONE TOLD ME ABOUT THE DOME CAMERA ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Thanks for looking Oldsk@@l..........
  15. Sadly this place is no more. One of my first explores last year, it may please some of you to see non processed images from myself too Here is abit of history from Geograph: The Norfolk Lunatic Asylum was situated in Yarmouth Road, Thorpe St Andrew near Norwich. The architects were Francis Stone and John Brown (Norfolk County Surveyors) and Robinson Cornish and Gaymer of North Walsham. The County Asylum was intended specifically for pauper lunatics and was only the second institution of its kind when completed in early 1814. The buildings were originally designed for the reception of 40 male patients in April 1814, followed by female patients in June of the same year. Roughly 70 patients were present on average in the early years. Extensions in 1831 and 1840 allowed this number to double and more substantial additions in the late 1850s as well as the construction of an auxiliary asylum, which was completed in 1881, some 700 inpatients could be accommodated. The auxiliary asylum or annexe is situated to the north of the main buildings, on the other side of Yarmouth Road, connected by a lane that was carried over the main road by a bridge. In April 1889 the institution was re-titled the Norfolk County Asylum, and after its modernisation into 'a hospital for mental disorders' (with reorganisation into distinct male and female asylums) there was room for more than 1,000 patients. To read it all look here: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2255369 Sorry no tripod So a few flash shots have been used! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Hope you enjoyed thanks for having a look.
  16. Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer. So, For a bit of History ; The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights. The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear. The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission. Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
  17. First did this location couple of years ago its a real nice spot as we were in the area it would have been rude not to revisit ..... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 18. 19. 20. 21. Cheers for looking Oldskool ..............
  18. Well whos idea was it to sort an explore after a urbex/hip hop xmas doo emmmmm ??? Got a txt of Cloaked Up at 7am ( i didnt get in bed till 1am) f**k off was my reply ....ohhh comon Oldskool if you dont come out Critical Mess will cry was his reply , so up i got up climbed into the back off his car and woke up outside our first location two hours later ;-( Now ill make no excuse for my wobbly photos or for the dust marks on the lens i could hardly stand up let alone operate a camera so here we go with Further Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Thanks for looking Oldskool .......
  19. This was a place we had wanted to visit for a long time so when it got mentioned in memory of DHL that a group of people would be getting together up here i jumped at the chance.. So myself UrbanGinger SpaceInvader met up with PaulPowers and headed in ,then met way too many people to name if i could remember who everyone was.. Nice to meet up with old and new faces..RIP dave Sorry i didnt get round to the abseil pitch that was set up my head was way to spinny for that.Great evening was had ,Thanks to all involved
  20. West Park was a nice site, but every man and his dog knew about it and the same shots used to get taken time and again. Reaperman (of http://abandoned-britain.com/ ) and I decided to do a night visit at a time when the place was extremely popular, and use it more as an experimenting ground for natural and artificially lit shots. Our aim wasn't to cover much ground, but to take shots until they came out right! It was a good experience and co-ordinating the lighting was good fun. Simply lit with torches and 2 coloured gels. Mr. B
  21. This was an odd explore, from the front of the building it looked like a standard office block but the inside told a different story. First off, some fairly standard looking CNC machines - but the further in we ventured the clearer it became. There was an entire production line left in situ for making alloy wheels! Each stage of the build process had its own machining area and the wheels were transported from one area to the next on a huge conveyor system - everything from milling, shot blasting, heat treatment, lacquering and pressure testing. Many of the machines had lot numbers attached and it was my guess that it wouldn't be long before everything including an immaculate rack of machine tools were auctioned off. We gradually made our way to the front of the building, where the only notable room was a small laboratory - still half equipped. An enjoyable explore and a good end to the day. Visited with Jaff Fox and thanks to H for his info. This sign, roughly translated means: food and drink are strictly prohibited in the lacquer plant. Mr. B!
  22. On March 19th 2011, most of the world experienced a 'Supermoon' "A supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon or a new moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the moon's disk as seen from Earth" - Wiki Many of my friends from further North in the country said that on that night it was either raining or extemely cloudy but luckily for myself and King Al, the moon provided some extraordinary lighting effects and what better place than a local explore with some decent vantage points from which to photograph it. All of these shots were taken over the course of a couple of hours and required extremely long shutter speeds of up to 5 minutes, but are all straight off the camera with no tweaking other than rotation, resizing and cropping. Enjoy Fullers with a twist.... Mr. B
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