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Found 51 results

  1. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  2. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  3. Everything left as if the hotel's owners left it with the thought that they will come back in a moment. Or maybe the contrary, with the thought that they can not go back there anymore. We know that they did not come back. We do not know why. At the bottom, aprons, cups, the inscription "Welcome wedding guests". Upstairs furniture, appliances, personal items, books. Everything is abandoned, not packed, segregated, as in the planned move. No. Abandoned and destroyed. Scattered. Maybe by a vandal who accidentally got there and could not respect the place and things that belonged to someone. Or maybe by someone who did it with the deliberation that was looking for something.
  4. When I die, honey when I part with the sun and I will be a long rather sad thing will you take care of me then? you will embrace your arms and you'll fix what broke cruel fate ...
  5. Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  6. Taxal Lodge - Photographic Report - 2018 #TaxelLodge Photographic Report - 11th March 2018 Built-in 1904 Taxal Lodge was once the home of Lt. Col. H. Ramsden Jodrell, Who passed away in 1950. The home became a Special School, for disruptive and emotionally disturbed kids that lived on site 5 days a week. It replaced an older Taxal Lodge that originally stood further up the valley. Over the years there have been various reports of abuse within the school and a lot of visitors and students claim that the lodge is haunted. Once the plug was pulled by the authorities the school was closed in 2005. Since its closure, the lodge fell victim to vandals & arson. Now other nature has now begun to stake her claim... The Urban Collective We Film It...
  7. This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  8. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  9. Hello, This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos. This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost. It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!
  10. Yep, it's another Italian asylum! Last one from this trip. We changed our plans at the last minute to check on this instead of visiting one of the better known spots. It was a bit of a gamble as we had no info and it was going to be the last explore of the trip, but it could be epic. I'm glad we did as it turned out to be a banger. Something interesting in every room and corridor pretty much. Lights still on in places and parts that looked not long abandoned. Probably the closest thing I've seen to one of the classic UK asylums in their hey day. We only had time to get around half of it unfortunately so I'm sure there is a lot more to see in here. Visited with elliot5200 & @shaddam Freaky bastard door, like something out of a horror film creaking and banging of it's own accord. Never heard anything like it. The first of many in here. Lights still on in some parts This semi-circular section was a secure wing for violent patients. Inside one of the cells and the adjacent corridor We popped our heads into the chapel just before we left as it was a bit bait. Very nice in there but it looked very much still in use so we didn't hang about. And that's all for now. Thanks for looking
  11. Churchills Pub Bolton - Feb 2018 This week on Bygone Pubs we take a look into the derelict Grade two listed #Churchills #pub in #Bolton #Lancashire Formerly #TheRoseHillTavern. Many a #BoltonWanderers fan will remember a match day at Burnden Park then off to Churchills for a good old pint. Unfortunately, though the memories are all that remains.
  12. This had been on my to-do list for some time having seen previous reports. I suppose for that reason it was more of a pilgrimage than an explore but well enjoyable nonetheless. We made a right meal of getting in here but it was necessary with the amount of activity near where we wanted to be. Not to mention the security chickens and sheep announcing our presence to all and sundry. The snow didn't help either, making sure we had no choice but to 'leave only footprints' from one end of the site to the other. Anyway, nobody came looking for us luckily and what a belter of a place. The main building is not only stunning but has some intact operating rooms full of equipment. I could have spent all day in there and I'll most likely pop back if ever in the area again as I'm told there is a morgue somewhere. We did try a few other buildings but they were mostly bricked up and the ones we got into didn't have much inside. A fruitful trip with elliot5200 and @shaddam Built in 1871, the site began as a charity hospital. It then became a military training college before turning into a psychiatric hospital. It was commonly referred to as "the factory of ideas" by locals. About 500 people worked there as doctors, clerks, nurses, and maintenance staff. It's busiest period of admissions came during WWII where the number of patients never fell below 1,000. The total number of patients reached it's peak of 1,400 in the 1960s. It was closed in 1981 when Basaglia law came into force. This was the act which signified a large reform of the psychiatric system in Italy. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. One of the other buildings with little inside 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Not a baaaaad explore at all Thanks for looking
  13. This was a fun one. A small part of the hospital is still in use so there were lots of vehicles coming and going. Security kept driving up and down the main road as well like it was groundhog day so we had to stay on our toes. The hospital was built in 1930 for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness. Towards the end of WWII, in 1945, a famous massacre took place here. Seventy five Italian Social Republic soldiers were brought here as prisoners and around 50 of them were brutally executed. Some of them being tied up with wire and crushed under the wheels of two trucks. Anyway, as I was saying, a fun place to hang out, with something to see in most of the buildings. I'd say we got around 75% of the abandoned stuff. Here's some pics: 1. Chapel 2. Not too impressive inside 3. 4. & 5. 6. Beds bolted to the floor 7. 8. 9. Not entirely sure what this was, some kind of meals on wheels type body trolley? 10. 11. Several buildings full of old documents 12. 13. 14. X-ray scans 15. Theatre/Cinema 16. Amazingly the projector has survived Thanks for looking
  14. The Old Sodality Club #Leigh Lanc's This video is the first of my new series #bygonepubs where Il be documenting the steady decline of these wonderful gathering holes as the corporations' franchises and chains etc increase their stamp on society. I've had wonderful feedback from many people since posting this video on "cough cough" Facebook, who've told me many wonderful stories about the place before it was lost to economic decline thank's to the powers that be. I believe the place closed in 2010 ish and was once a popular watering hole for many a denizen. From parties to football to darts and karaoke the place once bustled with the familiar tone's of friendship and alcoholism "Swigs his Guinness". You can almost hear the faint echoes of the past in places like these so I'd like to share my documentation of the place in a video format as I did not get many pics. Thanks for any feedback guys. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  15. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
  16. Former Latvian Consulate Charnock Richard - Feb 2018 I'm posting this to save you a journey lol, plus I wanted to at least make some use of the time I spent there even if the photos aren't the greatest! Pemberton farm was the former home of Howard J Pym Honorary Consul For Latvia and his family. The property was renovated in 2005 and the Pym family lived here until 2007. Timber Latvia Ltd was registered at Pemberton farm incorporated in 2010 but later dissolved. Since then the property has been on on the market for close to one million pounds, however, it now lies in a state of utter destruction thanks to vandals and arsonists and almost nothing remains of its former glory. Unfortunately, that is all the info I could gather on this place and I'm sure you'll agree from the pics it is a no-go, however, we did find thousands of spent ammunition rounds so if you can then please let me know what you think they are.
  17. Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Video Report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Hope this video report meets the standards for the sight, any feedback greatly appreciated as I just want to share my experiences with you guys not start selling caps and tee shirts and begging you to subscribe thanks.
  18. The Old Unknown Farmhouse - Chorley - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 I struggled to find any history on this stunning location except for the multitude of artifacts left inside from photographs to a pencil sketch by a man called Brian jay and the possibility that the property was once owned by a freemason. I have to admit guys this was my favorite explore to date. From the artifacts in and around the property including that stunning Vauxhall, my favorite find to date. To the general atmosphere of the old place. I had a quality time man and a trip back through it.
  19. Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  20. Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  21. Hey, guys, this is a video from my recent exploration of Manchester's Victoria Arches. Unfortunately, we were caught entering and as I couldn't resist taking a peak I went it alone. However, we will be back to make a proper video report on the place. I was absolutely gutted to not get a proper vid but the footage I did get was half decent and worth it for the experience alone. This place holds so many memories and it is astonishing to wonder whats under our feet.
  22. Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. A bit of history, Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
  23. The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge. The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels. The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off Entrance and staircase Reception Lift and staircase on the first floor Into the cocktail lounge.... The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof The Arran Suite... Restaurant... The restaurant's kitchen Other public spaces around the hotel... The Kyle Suite bar area The Carrick Room The Kintyre Suite And finally, the hotel rooms... View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
  24. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  25. The care home 2018 Not sure to much about this place, its been closed for around 4 years now and there is no damage on it whatsoever, ive been eyeing it up for around a year but never managed to gain access. But i struck a lucky one this week. Although what i did notice when i managed to gain entry was that none of the windows where smashed, but all the windows bar the upper level where boarded so no one could look in. So right were in, the first room was the kitchen, we noticed a infer red camera in the corner, then a slight beeping noise? We shit it and get out at this point we was taking no for an answer, we headed into a little forest nearby were we could see the front door and check if SECCA or police came we waited for about 35mins and nothing came then we discussed the options over a ice cold pint. so we did some googling and heading back, we came to the kitchen again, dodged the sensors and got to the front door where the main alarm system was, nothing happened this time no sensors no nothing? odd? we carried on strolling round after about 4/5 rooms the slight beeping noise came back on, then off, 20mins later back on? Not a clue we ignored it. we strolled round, some rooms had things moved, thrown about etc, so people had defiantly been in without a doubt. This place was cool. Things remained in places, i like that. But some rooms had a really strange feeling about them. after around 40 minutes in there, we seen about 40% maybe abit more, We decided to head out something felt weird like we didn't belong there. We got out and went back to the forest to check if secca arrived, 15 minutes later a van pulled up, it was secca. He didn't see us, but we could see him. He sat there 5/6 minutes, but for some reason did not check the building? Strange.. ... Until next time peoples. I'm not finished with this place. I shall be heading back to finish what i started. Enjoy the pics!