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Found 54 results

  1. The small chapel is idyllically situated on the hillside. Standing at the foot of the hill, the building is almost invisble. Thanks to the season, the knowing eye is able to spot the chapel between the sparse vegetation. Following up the slope for few minutes, a small weather-beaten wall appears. Climibing up the wall, there´s a small, overgrown path to follow. Inside the chapel it´s silent. Peaceful. The roof is full of holes - traces of the ravages of time. Ivy climbs steadily through the biggest of them. There´s still a large crucifix on the wall. The detailed depiction of Jesus is still in an unbelievable excellent condition. While Jesus looks as good as new, everything around him is decaying relentlessly. Unfortunately, I hardly have any information about the chapel. Old commemorative plaques testify that the chapel was probably errected by a local noble family. The building should be far more than 100 years old by now.
  2. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  3. This was the first stop on our weekend tour. It was a long arse drive from the tunnel to say the least! Cost a small fortune in tolls! A beautiful building inside! History: The construction of the chapel began mid 1800, This chapel is decorated in triforium (the openings of the galleries, above the aisles of a church, overlooking the nave), which is rare, for it is devoid of side aisles. Thanks for looking!
  4. A nice find by @SpiderMonkey while perusing the many chapels of Wales, this proved to be a surprisingly pleasing bonus for our Weekend... Capel Salem is an abandoned chapel in Pwllheli, North Wales. Built in 1862, the building was remodelled and enlarged in 1893 and is now Grade II listed. Along with the chapel, there are a couple of vestry rooms and a school room. The chapel was closed for around two years from 1913 and required extensive renovation following a fire. The fire was started by a local man who had tried to steal money from the chapel. He was unable to find any money so started the blaze instead.
  5. The first of a couple of chapels in Wales I visited with @SpiderMonkey last month... Engedi Chapel was established in 1842 and built as we see it today in 1867. The chapel's most impressive feature is its grand classical entrance, designed by architect Richard Owen of Liverpool. Its organ, pulpit and pews also remain intact.
  6. The Visit Managed to get into here a few week before it got burnt down and I am glad I did, was a enjoyable explore for a first outing even though it was trashed inside. History Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here In its later life, the chapel became known as the Loxley United Reformed / Independent Church. It is a grade 2 listed building and has been on English Heritage at risk register since August 1985 Pics:
  7. Salem Methodist Chapel was built in 1833 in Arthog, near Barmouth in North Wales. In 1868 it was rebuilt in the Gothic style of the gable-entry type, by architect Thomas of Landore, and eventually closed in 1973. Apparently the owner of the building moved abroad to avoid paying a bill for a quarter of a million pounds, which means as a result the walls and other works of the structure are unsafe to passing motorists and local residents due to lack of maintenance. It has been assessed and surveyed and is deemed likely to collapse on itself if it does go. Me and @plod were on holiday in the area so I did a bit of research to see what was about that we could explore. We hadn't yet done a chapel so I was pretty eager to look at this one, so we took a long walk up to check it out. It seems the chapel roof has already started collapsing in on itself which is a huge risk with it being situated on a hill right next to the road, although we got some great views of the inside of the chapel from the path that goes up along by the roof. I really liked the little piano in the corner too, and the building itself was in a very nice state of decay. We actually ended up sleeping in here one of the nights since we walked here at about 3am and were too far away from where we were staying
  8. One of my favourites during our trip through Italy. A beautiful chapel and when the sun shines you see the beautiful colors inside, it makes you speechless... #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9
  9. History Pair of former chapels, now disused. 1856. By Michael Drury. Coursed and squared rubble with ashlar dressings and plain tile roof. Gothic Revival style with pointed arched windows and Geometrical tracery. EXTERIOR: chamfered and moulded plinth, sill band, moulded eaves, coped gables with crosses and finials. North side has a central gable with an archway and shafts, flanked by single gabled buttresses. Beyond, single blocked 3-light windows. To left, the octagonal east chapel has angle buttresses and 3 gables, each with a 4-light window. Roof gablets. Fleche removed. To right, west chapel with apsidal end and buttresses, 3 bays, with six 2-light windows with hoodmoulds. In the north gable, a 5-light window. Square north-west tower, 3 stages, has to north a gabled doorway with shafts. Above, a trefoiled vescia piscis and to east, a 2-light window. Third stage has a foiled corbel table and to north, a rose window. On the other sides, 3-light windows. Spire removed. INTERIOR: east chapel has an arch braced conical roof with collars forming a corona. West chapel has a moulded stone arch to the apse, and an arch braced double purlin roof. Both chapels have foliage corbels. The Explore This was the first explore out with my new camera and i'm pretty chuffed with the pics. I really can't take any credit at all for this, @hamtagger, has been watching this place for probably the best part of 2 years. I would have known nothing about it otherwise. We were on an evening walk through the cemetery (being interested in the dead and all, this is how we roll) when we noticed that the door was slightly ajar. Outside the door there are a few beer cans which at a guess gave me the impression that a drunk had tried getting in. Not equipped with our camera's and with light not being on our side we decided to come back another day. After a few days we found ourselves in there one afternoon. Not knowing what to expect really, we knew that the place had been closed for a long time and judging by the quantity of pigeon shit even behind the door which had built up in to a mound having been recently opened it was longer than we thought. This should have been called the Pigeon Palace. What a lovely little place for these flying rats to nest. Only the West side is accessible, going in through the door it has a lovely porch area. To the left was a small room, teracotta and black diamond floor made from Clay tiles, 2 windows and a small fire looking thing in the corner. On the right as you go in there is another door which leads to the tower. Unfortunately no way you can get up with the rotting stairs and platfforms above. The spire had been removed leading to a lot of water ingress. The main Chapel was relatively pretty, decorated at the edges where the concrete arches were with foliage made from stone. The Pews were nicely crafted too. The altar still remains but very bare. Allthough it very much had the feeling of a church there was very little to make clear that it was infact a church other than those things we would recognise as being in one. There were no plaques on the wall, inside or out. No scriptures, nothing. I really enjoyed it, despite the pigeon cemetery and faeces inside. Some really nice woodwork on the window frames on the exterior of the East side, I have googled and nothing has come up. It looks like a crocodile/Alligator/Lizard?? Anyway, on with the pics and thanks for looking! 1 2 3 4 5 6, The Pews had suffered from woodworm, sadly. 7 8, The remains of the tower 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  10. Germany Funeral Chapel Z.

    The small funeral chapel was an accidental find. The chapel is located a bit seclusively in an area which is off the beaten track anyway. But the area around it appears to be pretty neat. The chapel hardly catches anybody´s eyes. Only the exact observer will spot it. That might be the reason why the shmall church is still in a pretty good condition. You´ll approach and explore a very peaceful place. A metall door, that leads into the cellar, is half-open. You can´t see anything but darkness. I walk by the door and enter the chapel from behind through an open door. As soon as I had entered the chapel, It appeared to me that this place wasn´t an ordinary chapel. It was obviously used as a funeral chapel. The first room you´ll enter is a tiled room, which was apparently used for washing and preparing the bodies before burial. After that you´ll reach the actual chapel. which was used for funeral ceremonies. An old, red carpet is still lying around and a big cross is still painted on the wall. In the attic you´ll find the former staff rooms. While my fellow-urbexers were taking their photos in the chapel, I remembered the door leading into the cellar. So I went to explore the cellar on my own. Cellars have never been my favorite place but after knowing about the purpose of this chapel it definitely didn´t help to feel better. I had barely squeezed through the door when I saw the construction on the stairs, which was obviously used for the transportation of the bodies up and down the stairs. Someone had placed a broken cruzifix on it. I went down the stairs following them into the pitch-dark cellar. I was right in the middle of the former morgue of the chapel. An old apron was hanging on the door, a wooden cross leaning against the wall. Even old utensils for preparing the bodies. In a side room was the former cooling room with the mortuary refrigerator (tightly closed). In the next small room you could find old coffin lids. My eyes became gradually adjusted to the darkness, which let the place appear less scary. When my friends started to capture the cellar, I waited on an old stone bench. It was a wonderfull autumn´s day. I really felt the tranquility of this place. If these walls could talk, this place could tell many stories of grief and goodbyes. Yet, the peacefulness and the location of this place even comforted me. Such a nice place to say good-bye. Ohne Titel Ohne Titel Ohne Titel Ohne Titel
  11. Palace Casino is huge abandoned house in Italy. The grandly named building was actually neither a palace nor a casino, however to look at you could easily imagine it as either. The stunning rooms were created when the house was remodelled by the empress of France who completely renovated the building. Rooms include an exquisitely decorated entrance hall which was unfortunately in almost complete darkness making it very difficult to photograph, and a huge double staircase sweeps upstairs. An amazing chapel also forms part of the house. The chapel features painted murals on all the walls and ceilings. 1. The grand staircase 2. Staircase angle 3. Between the stairseseses 4. View down a square stair 5. Columns! 6. The exquisite entrance hall 7. Entrance hall 8. Sitting room 9. Ornate ceiling 10. Ornate room 11. Table and wood panel cabinets 12. Bedroom 13. Kitchen The Chapel 14. Chapel from the back 15. Chapel from the front 16. Chapel from the side 17. Altar
  12. The chapel, with ten-part rose windows, was intended simply as a funerary chapel, not a place of worship, and intended to be non-denominational. The floor plan is in the shape of a cross and the main entrance was covered for access by horse-drawn funeral carriages. Winding wooden staircases in the twin turrets gave access to the public gallery above. The octagonal steeple stands at 120 feet (36,5 meters) and was the tallest in the district when it was built in 1840. The architect was William Hosking, better known as a civil engineer; this (and the main cemetery entrance) remain the only surviving examples of his architectural work. The chapel is also the oldest surviving non-denominational funerary chapel in Europe. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  13. The Blue Chapel forms part of a monastery in Italy. The area above the altar is painted blue and the high level windows flood the space with light and create an amazing blue glow behind a suspended figure of Jesus on a cross. The chapel is beautiful. It is a large space with ornate decorations, and all the seats are still in place. Alcoves at either side contain figures of people in glass boxes. The rest of the monastery is quite stripped and decaying. There are a large number of rooms in the building which would have mainly been used as living quarters. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, @PROJ3CTM4YH3M and Kriegaffe9
  14. The Explore A nice local one for this... nothing out of the ordinary on this explore really.. most of the building has been gutted but the dome alone made it worth the visit The History Sanofi's operations in the UK are aligned with the priorities of the NHS, and have for over 40 years been integral to our global success. Although the global headquarters are in Paris, in the UK they employ over 2,000 across the Group. With major products for diabetes, oncology, cardiovascular diseases, thrombosis and central nervous system disorders, providing effective healthcare solutions for patients all over the world. In August 2011, Bluemantle gained permission to transform the 30-acre former site of pharmaceutical firm Sanofi Aventis into a retail and leisure complex, which included the plans for the homes. The massive plans also include a convenience store, pub, restaurant, 40-bed hotel, offices, a medical facility, care home and childrens day centre. A housing developer has bought the land on the former Fisons site in Holmes Chapel in a £13 million deal. The deal for the 20-acre residential site on London Road, which will see the creation of 231 homes in the village. Bellway will build the homes on the site and has submitted a reserved matters application. Building work is due to start later this year, while Bluemantle has retained ownership of the remaining 10 acres.
  15. This was our last spot on our day in Sheffield and for myself love places like this but wasnt that much in there History - Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here Today the Graveyard and associated land is poorly maintained (it seems to be a theme in Sheffield graveyards).
  16. UK Loxley Chapel Oct 2015

    Welcome to a place that has been a thorn in my side for the better part of a year and a half. Over repeated trips to Sheffield or up north I would stop by here, and every time I did, it would be sealed. Not so today, on my fourth attempt I finally got in. Whilst walking around the outside we heard voices from within and when entering discovered a group of about six girls and boys poking around the place, perfectly nice guys but my god they were noisy so any hint of subtlety was out the window. Sadly this place is quickly getting ruined by the local pondlife, so I'm glad I got to see it finally before it goes really downhill. Apart from nearly falling into the basement due to the hatch being open in a dark room it was fine, I do like a derelict church and after waiting so long to see this one it didn't disappoint. Thanks for looking more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659952221079
  17. Recently I went further north than I ever have before, on an explore/fun times roadtrip to Scotland and the far north of England. Whilst it wasn't the most fruitful in terms of epic explores it was great to be out in some truly beautiful areas of the country seeing some new stuff. Garthland House Chapel was once part of a large estate turned nursing home, which now sits in a semi-demolished and perilous state. Luckily the chapel is still relatively intact and very pretty, but the rest of the place is really nothing more than a dangerous ruin with water pouring through it from the day's rain so we focused our efforts on the chapel itself. Thanks to Baron for the heads up on this one Thanks for looking
  18. History Bethel Methodist Chapel was the third Calvinist chapel to be built in Newtown, the largest town in the county of Powys, Wales. It was originally constructed in 1810, and was later replaced in 1820. The present chapel was constructed on the site between 1875 and 1876. The Gothic style building, with its gable entry plan and flanking turrets, was designed by Richard Owens of Liverpool who was a distinguished architect at that time. The entire construction cost just over £2,300; most of this went towards the front elevation which is squared in masonry and sandstone dressings, the two buttresses to the main gable which at one time featured two individual spirelets, a large central wooden door and the slate roof tiles. The remainder of the building was constructed out of an inexpensive yellow brick. It is estimated that the former chapel once seated approximately 450 people. Although the former chapel was sold back in 2008/2009, it has since fallen into a bad state of repair. Initial plans expected to redevelop the site into residential accommodation or offices, but no such work was ever initiated. Internal water damage has caused a number of the wooden floorboards to disintegrate throughout the building, and a section of the upper balcony has collapsed under its own weight since a number of slates have fallen off the roof causing the roof above to decay rapidly. Our Version of Events With the Newport Transporter conquered, it was time to move on. However, owing to various people’s work commitments and other things, rather than heading further south we decided to head up through Wales instead. It had been a while since we’d all been there and there was plenty of cracking scenery to take in, so it seemed like a good idea. With plenty of driving to do before we reached the north east once again though, we decided to take a pit stop in the small town of Newtown because we’d heard that there was a pleasant little abandoned chapel there. As it turned out, there was indeed an abandoned chapel there. Access was pretty straightforward, which was a little disappointing after the challenge we had earlier the previous evening to get on the bridge, but we carried on and decided to take a look anyway. The chapel was smaller inside than it looks from the outside, and aside from the main navel there are only a couple of other empty rooms. The main body of the chapel itself still retains most of the classic features; namely its pews, the stained glass windows, an altar and the upper balcony, so they certainly made up for the disappointing overall size. We spent around twenty minutes there before we decided to crack on and make a move. Onwards and upwards was our main intention that day. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky. 1: Bethel Chapel 2: Stained Glass up the Staircase 3: The Upper Balcony 4: Looking Down at Bethel Chapel's Navel 5: Trying to get the Roof in too 6: Intact Stained Glass 7: Heading Downstairs 8: The Backrooms 9: The Kitchen 10: Even More Stained Glass 11: Standing at the Altar 12: Rotten Floorboards 13: Rows of Pews 14: Front Entrance Window 15: The Old Wooden Door 16: Bethel Chapel External Shot
  19. Be rude not to have a look at this place, I was passing. The main entrance was blocked by RTC and police so a good old rough rear entry was in order. Bet this was stunning in its day. Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here. The accompanying graveyard has also been abandoned, though wondering through you can clearly see well walked paths to some clean/not so forgotten loved ones graves. In its later life, the chapel became known as the Loxley United Reformed / Independent Church. It is a grade 2 listed building and has been on English Heritage at risk register since August 1985. Thanks for looking guys and gals
  20. Italy The Blue Chapel... June '15

    More Italian goodness from our recent 'Tour di Bastardi' A lovely chapel with a blue hue, hence the name, tucked away in a ridiculously beautiful part of the world!! Attached to what I presume was maybe a seminary? Heres some pics... Thanks for lookin' in...
  21. History Antonio Hall, listed as a Category 2 Historic Place, is a large abandoned mansion located in Christchurch, New Zealand. Thomas Kincaid, a successful grocery merchant, had construction begin in 1904 on six acres of land, however, the structure wasn't fully completed until 1909. Clarkson and Ballantyne were commissioned to design and oversee the development of the mansion which was intended to be styled as a comfortable modernised Victorian/English Domestic building. By 1929, though, both Mr Kincaid and his wife had passed away and the property was sold to John Montgomery, a prominent citizen of Christchurch. Throughout Mr Montgomery's ownership the mansion retained its original name as the 'Kincaid Property', although the gardens were extensively redeveloped. Nevertheless, by 1946 the house was once again sold; this time to Bishop P.F. Lyons, on behalf of the New Zealand Catholic Bishops. In 1947 the Kincaid Property subsequently became the 'Holy Name Seminary', catering for young boys who aspired to become priests. Towards the very end of the 1940's it was reasoned the that premises were inadequate for its new purpose, thus, money was invested to construct additional dormitories, a new dining room and and onsite chapel; which opened in 1950. The chapel was later extended in 1959 when the Holy Name Seminary became a house of Philosophy and a Major Seminary. Further lecture halls were also included in the ongoing renovations. Unfortunately, not too soon after affording time and effort into such extensions, it was deemed that it was no longer financially viable to manage the property; the decline in enrolling numbers had a detrimental effect upon the the future of the house and Seminary. In the years to follow the Churches only viable option was to operate the premises as a private hostel for university students. As it effectively became a student hall of residence, or college as they are otherwise termed, it was subsequently renamed and became known as 'Campion Hall'. By 1981, the property was sold to Mrs Luisetti and her husband, and they chose to run the site as a boarding house. The building was able to cater for up to one hundred people at a time and the additional space was often used to cater for further wedding receptions and other joyous events. Mrs Luisetti renamed the house in memory of her son, who was tragically killed in 1975. For unknown reasons the building was later sold to the Wellstar Company Ltd., and since then it has remained largely vacant; despite now being privately owned. On a positive note though, there are reports suggesting that in the years it has been closed a few of the rooms have been used as temporary accommodation for people who are homeless. In 2011 Antonio Hall fell victim to the earthquakes, like many of the buildings across Christchurch. The only person rumoured to be living onsite at the time was the groundskeeper and, despite the extensive damage that occurred in the section he was living in, it is reported that he managed to escape unharmed. The former mansion, which covers 4283 square metres, with over one hundred bedrooms, seven lecture rooms, a library, a cool store, dining and kitchen facilities, a water-tower, garden sheds and a chapel, now lies entirely abandoned; potentially awaiting demolition. Our Version of Events Yet again we have another property potentially awaiting demolition in Christchurch, primarily because the estimated costs to repair the site are considered to be too great. As an explore though, Antonio Hall offers much more than your average mansion. From the outside one can easily be forgiven for making the assumption that it's likely to be nothing too special, however, once inside it's foreseeable that opinions will be swayed. We wandered around this site for hours, taking in all of the objects that have been left behind and forgotten. The site was so big I've been unable to post photos of everything that can be found inside. The best way to describe the site is as a wacky maze, full of intricate designs and styles, and yet, there's also a certain sense of sadness about the place, as beds lie untended and various bits and pieces have started to crumble away. Explored with Nillskill. 1: Antonio Hall 2: Fire Damaged Bedroom 3: Intact Bedroom 4: Another One of the Many Bedrooms 5: Open Book 6: Leafy Piano 7: Old Armchair 8: Larger and More Grand Piano 9: The Chapel 10: The Chapel Black and White Shot (With Pews) 11: Missing Staircase 12: Former Girls Dormitories 13: Girls Dorm Bedroom 14: Old Cooker Hobs 15: The Damaged Ceiling (This Sort of Scene was Commonplace Throughout) 16: The Water-Tower 17: Antonio Hall from the Water-Tower 18: A View from the Water-Tower 19: Christchurch Behind Antonio Hall's Roof 20: Golf Buggy 21: The Gardener's Shed 22: Rusting Oil Tank (Gardener's Shed Behind) 23: The Kitchens 24: The Dining Room 25: The Dining Room Black and White Shot 26: Detailed Wall Decor 27: Fabric that was Formerly in Storage 28: The Head Wedding Table 29: Stained Glass Window in the Chapel 30: A Second Stained Glass Window in the Chapel
  22. History Erskine College, located in Island Bay, Wellington, is listed as a Category One Historic Place and is a former Catholic girls’ boarding school. Originally constructed in 1905/06, the building was named the Convent of the Sacred Heart, and it was intended that its structural design be a combination of French Gothic and Edwardian Collegiate architecture. The chapel (Chapel of the Sacred Heart) wasn’t built until 1929/30. The name was altered in the late 1960’s, to avoid confusion with the Sacred Heart College which is located in Lower Hutt, Wellington. The site was named after Mother Janet Erskine Stuart, the fifth Superior General of the Society of the Sacred Heart. Although the site fell into a state of decay in the 1990’s, Learning Connexion art school reoccupied the buildings between 1997 and 2009; during this time the chapel was also refurbished and used for small wedding services. The entire site was declared unsafe in 2012 due to the increased fears of earthquake threats, and it has since remained abandoned. Our Version of Events Just as I was preparing to depart New Zealand, it was decided that there was an hour to kill. Erskine College suddenly jumped onto the cards because there were rumours of a chapel lurking within its depths that has been largely unexplored. After a quick food stop at New World, we made our way to the old college on the hill. Quite conscious that I’d put on some cleaner clothes for the flight home, we made our way through some rather muddy woods at the back of the site – to avoid detection and make for a better story. Despite the rain pouring from the trees, and the steep muddy slopes, we managed to reach a point of entry largely unscathed and clean. I even managed to climb up the site of the building and through a window without getting my hands dirty; or so I thought at the time. Sure enough, after ten minutes of wandering, there she was!.. A chapel which was, for the most part, quite pristine, save for the odd crisp packet. By this point though, time was ticking away fast, so we quickly made every effort to grab as many photos as possible. As it turns out, however, I think I should have aimed for quality over quantity, as many of my photographs came our rather blurry on account of my rushing around. Unfortunately, because of the time limit and the sheer size of the site, we only managed to explore a fraction of the college, but, I guess a quick explore is better than no explore! Afterwards, we raced to the airport so I could check my bag in (early bag check-ins for international flights apparently), then, after a beer in the airport bar, we quickly left again to check out an abandoned prison. Up on the hilltop, however, we managed to get a flat tire after driving over a particularly large piece of rock, and so, after fitting the spare, I decided it was time to stop fucking around and go get the plane. Sure enough, back at the airport I soon discovered that my trousers had half the hillside on them, and plenty of chapel plaster dust… And so, that’s how my journey to New Zealand ended; trying desperately, ten minutes before my flight, to brush off all the ‘foreign contaminants’ before I attempted to leave the country and re-enter the UK. Explored with Nillskill. 1: Erskine College External Shot 2: Erskine College Back in the Day 3: Main Hall 4: Function Hall 5: Another Hall 6: Obligatory Staircase Shot 7: Upstairs Rooms - Adjacent to the Chapel 8: The Chapel Stained Glass Windows 9: Chapel of the Sacred Heart 10: Chapel of the Sacred Heart - Ground Shot 11: Jesus 12: Side Room in the Chapel 13: Chapel Candles 14: Side Seating 15: High Ceiling 16: Frontal Stained Glass Windows 17: Chapel With the Altar Table 18: The Main Altar 19: The Virgin Mary 20: Staircase Leading out of the Chapel 21: Decorative Room 22: Stage Area 23: Old Piano 24: Old-School Lift 25: External Shot
  23. Another installment from the Jupilerrrrrr tour with Baron and Mega Magpie Masa von derp. This small chapel in part of a old hospital was a fairly simple and quick visit, there were workers there taking stuff out, but believe the place has since been demolished! Many thanks for looking!
  24. So after a night in a Stoke Hotel, the car was thankfully still there... Me and Ben went on our way to the next site. I hadn’t actually heard of this one but instantly recognised it when I looked UP! I’d been wondering where that photo had been taken! The lovely but derped admin block is all that’s left of the Fisons/Sanofi-Aventi Pharmaceutical Research Site in Holmes Chapel. Bengers opened the site in 1937, then Fisons researched the drug Intal on site after Fisons took over in the 60s. The site was closed around 2004 when Sanofi-Aventi bought the site and built a shiny new place next door. The site was sold for £13,000,000 in 2012 and plans for Homes and a Shopping Park have not progressed. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157652304848818
  25. The next stop north on the big roadtrip was this little spot. It was originally a Fisons Pharmaceutical Research site before being taken over by Sanofi Aventis who own the new very big very live factory next door. All of the adjacent old site has been demolished except the big art deco admin building which is mostly stripped but with one wonderful staircase/glass dome in the middle which makes it worth the visit. Little signs remain of it's former usage and identity other than a few rolls of old Fisons tape and some big metal letters. After waiting what seemed like an age for a National Grid van sat right in front of the access point to bugger off we were in. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157652606216272
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