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Found 21 results

  1. I love this place, Explored it back in 2010 and when I heard it was open again I had to go back, Bit of History for those of you that dont know; Crete Road / Silver Springs Reservoir, Construction work was completed on July 1866, It was alleged to have supplied the Silver Springs Soft Drinks Company with water although some other History that I have read seems to contradict this, There are two tanks, Each approx 88ft long and lined with cement, They are Interconnected by arch ways, So so Pics Left Hand Side Right Hand Side Overflow Pipe and Rungs down in to the Right Chamber from Overhead Bit of Arty And Finally Thanks for taking the time to check out my Pics
  2. I did this last year and have wanted to go back and do the others; this is one of twenty or so drainage tunnels that take water away from the main Dover to Folkestone railway line. Back to June 2012…after the epic let down of not hitting up the asylum today we decided to spend our hard earnt Saturday morning off underground… Now for those of you that do not live in this drought zone they call Kent let me assure you that it isn’t! The amount of water flowing freely out to sea from these drains is staggering! The water companies should be ashamed of themselves! But anyway..I digress..turned out that a mixture of water, clay and chalk makes one of the strongest stickiest substances on earth! ..I kid you not..nearly lost me wellies every other step..it’s evil stuff ! So, whilst attempting not to sink so far into this primeval ooze that we’d be back in the land of dinosaurs, slip on the metal sectioning or even worse lose my camera we did manage to get a few shots.. It was wet down there…very wet..trying to light the shot keep water off the camera and lens was hard..hope you enjoy the results.. Oh really!... The start of the ooze! running water..sticky mud..looks easy..it was hell! Where we bothered by the ruptured tunnel skin..no of course not ! It was a very long tunnel... The water pouring out of those pipes was fast and furious ! The concrete section has the railway line running right above it...when a train goes over your head it's the most eerie feeling ! What was that creaking sound... And some more mud! Will be heading back to explore the others now that the sun has started to shine ! If anyone wants to tag along give me a shout..
  3. First visited this site a year ago with one flew east but after a 4am start really couldn't be arsed to shoot anything in here as it wasnt doing much for my creative juices..So a year on we where in the area and myself,Spaceinvader Obscurity and Storm Popped our heads in to see how much it had decayed..still no access into the chapel but its been trashed even more..think it closed down in 2005/2006 .. On with a few pics Dead bird ..as you do... Not exactly epic but a nice wander for a few hours
  4. Visited with Skeleton Key, UrbanX, Trog and Mrs Trog, Urban Ginger and IanB Since it construction, the hospital has been known by a few different names......Folkestone Dispensary from 1846 to 1863, then between 1863 and 1890 it was called The Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary, follwed by The Victoria Hospital between 1890 and 1910 and lastly The Royal Victoria Hospital from 1910 onwards. The Hospital in 1898 In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital and following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford in 1979, the Royal Victoria was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery and general practitioner patients. On the 14th September 1944, the Hospital was hit by a German shell. Two members of staff and a passing member of the home guard were killed. In 2005 it was decided that 2 wards were to close at the hospital,and in 2006 it was announced that the old victorian building at Royal Victoria was to be put up for sale by it’s owners, the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust. Within a week an action group was setup, Save OUR Royal Victoria. The East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust confirmed in 2007 that the building would be sold, but did pledge to re-locate some of the services into adjacent hospital buildings which were remaining open. In 2008 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust committed to retaining all services at the current hospital site with a £3.6 million investment in upgrading and modernising the remaining buildings. There was also a deal struck to retain the main building facade of the origenal victorian building when the land is developed. As the trust wants to sell the site with planning permission for houses, it first commissioned an ecology survey - during which the pipistrelle and rare serotine bats were discovered in the back of the main building and in the separate Wakefield Hall. This has set back the trust's plans by around nine months, while further information about the protected species is collected and alternative roosts are provided. Director of facilities Howard Jones said: "We had not noticed any bats before the survey so it was a surprise. It is a bit of a nuisance, but planning is a tricky thing these days, the trust is to apply for a licence to remove the bat roosts and to make sure they are caused minimum disturbance." BATS 1 - Developers 0
  5. Crete Road Reservoir was Constructed in 1866, completed late July Its sole purpose was to supply water to the Silver Spring Soft Drinks Factory, Visited with Space Invader On with some pics And now for a bit of self indulgednce And one from "Up Top" Also Visited The Hills pipeline tunnel whilst we were there, Some pics from this also Space Invader kind of got featured in this one Thanks for taking the time to check out my pics
  6. UK Crete Rd folkestone june 2011

    visited with silver rainbow a little history Crete Road reservoir is build into the hillside in Folkestone. It's victorian in contruction, being built about 1866, and consists of 2 arched rooms about 88 feet long each, which were used as massive water tanks to supply a drinks factory lower down on the hillside with a reliable supply of water for use in it's manufacturing process. on with the pics a few of the pumping station tunnel thanks for looking
  7. Big thanks to the guys who found this, and Obscurity and Wevsky for some help. We origenally intended to do this last week, but alas it wasn't to be. One week later, and with a bit of lateral thinking we were inside. This hospital has been known by several different names in its time, Folkestone Dispensary (1846-1863) Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary (1863-1890) Victoria Hospital (1890-1910) Royal Victoria Hospital (1910-present) In the post war era it was operated as an NHS hospital offering most of the common NHS services at the time. In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital and following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford in 1979, this hospital was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery and general practitioner patients. In June 2005 it was announced that 2 wards were to close at the hospital, The Fitton and Edinburgh wards. They duely closed later that year. In December 2006 it was announced that the old victorian building at Royal Victoria was to be put up for sale by it's owners, the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust. Within a week an action group was setup, Save OUR Royal Victoria, with aims to draw attention to the hospital and the potential re-location of key services to other hospitals. In June 2007 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust confirmed the building would be sold, but did pledge to re-locate some of the services into adjacent hospital buildings which were remaining open. In September 2008 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust committed to retaining all services at the current hospital site with a £3.6 million investment in upgrading and modernising the remaining buildings. There was also a deal struck to retain the main building facade of the origenal victorian building when the land is developed. There appears to be some development happening on site as we recced the place the week before, unfortunitely not gaining access that time so we returned this week with a plan and also found some scaffolding has sprung up at the front. There's also some inside the building on the top floor. There is a published history of the hospital: Martin Easdown, A Grand Old Lady: The History of the Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, 1846-1996 (1996) Visited with Frosty. Firstly, an old photo of the outside - this one was taken in 1910. Secondly an apology that most of my photos are portrait, it seemed to suit the building better, but it has made this post seem quite long! Good to see the NHS taking such good care of medical records Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  8. The school started as Westbrook House School Shorncliffe Road in about 1947 as a boys only preparatory school under the headmastership of Kenneth Foster. Without doubt the best prep school for boys in Folkestone. In the 1970's it became Dover College Junior School, before returning to Westbrook House. It amalgamated with St Marist Convent for girls in the late 1990's to become St Mary's Westbrook. Some old piccies of the place Visited with Skeleton Key, Priority 7 and Tstranger Thanks for looking
  9. Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, Originally opened in 1846 as Folkestone Dispensary, Visited with Space invader, Wevsky, Ian B, Obscurity and his mate, I wont go on with the history as Wevsky and the other guys have more than Covered it very nicely And so on with the pics How it was "Back in the day" Hospital Radio I could Picture Smashy & Nicey in here ! X - Ray And Finally The Morgue Sorry If its a bit "pic Heavy" But I took hundreds in here and this isnt even the tip of the ice-Berg
  10. Westbrook House was a Preparatory School based in folkestone for 2-11 year olds. It was established on the site in Folkestone after the second world war by K.N.G. Foster, and existed in one form or other right up until 2008 when it closed its doors with just 119 pupils on role - it's capacity was 310. It was essentially a victim of the credit crunch. News article about the closure here http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/kent/7513184.stm I've had my eye on this for a while, but never managed to find a way inside until recently. It's very stripped out, but a nice building with a few hidden bits which make it worthwhile. Visited with Frosty.
  11. After visiting mid week for the first time.And realizing there was just to much to take in in the little daylight we had left So we decided last minute a revisit had to be done,so after an early morning start with wevsky and obscurity we headed back to folkestone . This is the first time ive explored an hospital in such good condition was and defintley worth the revisit .... visited with wevsky obscurity,silver rainbow ,peach ,troglodyte and ian b wont bore u with the history again so on with the pics THANKS FOR LOOKING
  12. Royal Victoria Hospital? Previous name(s) Folkestone Dispensary (1846-1863), Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary (1863-1890), Victoria Hospital (1890-1910) Foundation Year 1846...Closed November 2009(ish) In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital. Following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford, this hospital was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery (1980-1994) and general practitioner patients. There is a published history of the hospital: Martin Easdown, A Grand Old Lady: The History of the Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, 1846-1996 (1996) And as far as I can tell the last two remaining inpatient wards at the Royal Victoria Hospital closed in 2004/5 as for date the rest the amenities where transferred to the walk in centre next door I think that was some point 2006 and when this hospital finally closed its doors in 2009 November we think due to calender left open and various letters..its been left to sit ever since! For a run down on what?s proposed for the site if you really want to know then have a look http://www.gofolkestone.org.uk/newsletters/september2007/rvhospital.html Combination of two visits so ..visited with obscurity SpaceInvader , Silver rainbow,Troglodyte and Peach...Big shout out to Ianb for visiting with us on this one.. A nice old pic from way back when On with a few of the several hunderd pics ive taken..really dont wanna do a multiple thread thing with a huge amount of pics and tbh its been hard trying to pic out some of the best features..but here goes Im sure obscurity @ space invader etc will put up a different selection as i say hundreds of shots to choose from and forgot to upload a few of the radio station but hey ho .. Thanks for looking
  13. This was qite a tricky place to find as it was another night time explore,we evetully found it after lots of useful texts from the ever helpful Obscurity,visited with wevsky & nitewalker. The history,not much available about this place. Crete Road reservoir is build into the hillside just off Crete Road West in Folkestone. It's victorian in contruction, being built about 1866, and consists of 2 arched rooms about 88 feet long each, which were used as massive water tanks to supply a drinks factory lower down on the hillside with a reliable supply of water for use in it's manufacturing process. This is part of Hills reservoir,can find any info about this place,got in by pure chance that the door had been left unlocked
  14. Right wasnt gunna do this post cos the main bit we went to see st matrins kinda placed obsticles for my 2 friends i got in but as they couldnt i ended up coming out again visited a place in folkstone the name of which escapes me cos i was in the back of van..2nd spot we visited was given info from a local..bit naff as it was just a staircase leading down a tunnel to a small room with an exit at end of,i personanly do not like heights cliff edges nor the 45 degree angles and narrow pathways leading in and out so my arse was flapping to the point i may have shouted "i want my mummy"..did it tho and if anyones recognsies the tunnel and knows about it do tell..right not many pics so short report Right this is inside the gate at st martins these few are inside the tunneled staircase And heres some from inside the shelter at folkestone all flash im afraid was fealing way too ill to spend much more time out
  15. The Road of Remembrance bunker lies midway on the Road of Remembrance, and it was used as a WW2 naval communication centre. It was originally built with 2 entrances, a number of toilets, and a ventilation room directly above the complex. There are still the remains of WW2 posters up around the walls. For its position on the roadside the bunker is in relatively good condition and is well worth a visit. A short walk down the road sees yourself strolling onto the old Folkestone harbour train station, with hardly any energy left I didn't venture down to the lighthouse but at least it gives me a reason to go back. Hope you like the photo's, comments are always welcomed. Ryda A medium size photo just doesnt do this one justice:
  16. The bunker along Road Of Remembrance in Folkestone is believed to have been a WW2 naval communication facility. It originally had two entrances several rooms and toilets, with a ventilation room above the complex. You can still see the remains of several WW2 posters on the walls of this place. There may be plans to renovate this bunker and open it to the public as part of the plans for marking the centenary of the outbreak of hostilities in WW1 which takes place in 2014. More information here http://www.grand-uk.com/Step%20Short.html There's also a rather nice map of the place here. http://www.grand-uk.com/Step%20Short%20Files/Step%20Short%20Bunker%20map.pdf Looking back towards the main entrance Looking back towards the second entrance Few nice features left. Remains of posters It's definitely one of the best condition WWII bunkers I've been in. Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  17. This place has intrigued me since I saw it about 4 or 5 years ago, but I had no idea it was derelict until about a year ago - from a distance it looks like it's still in use as it's not in that bad shape. I'm not sure if this was a control tower of some sort, or merely an observation platform. It's next to folkestone harbour, and yellow pages dating would put it's closure at around 2003/4. Unfortunitely I didn't get many photos - I was somewhat limited photography wise as we couldn't use torches being surrounded by glass in direct line of sight of the the harbour entrance, but I thought I'd stick them up anyway. We did venture into the lower levels of the tower, but I couldn't photograph anything down there - it was too dark - there wasn't much left to see anyway, kitchen, staff room and offices. This is what it looks like on the outside This is what it looks like at the top on the inside And the view out of a couple of the very dirty windows at the top Apologies for the photos, but I thought it was interesting enough to warrant a post. Maniac.
  18. After seeing Superwide's previous post viewtopic.php?f=14&t=736&p=5918&hilit=Folkestone+Harbour#p5862 and talking to a couple of work mates who actually worked there and wanted to do a bit of a history of stations display at work. I decided to go and explore it for myself. So with Mrs PowerSurge and Toddler PowerSurge in tow I headed down to Folkestone to meet up with Oldie68. The weather was brilliant and Oldie had a lot of good advice and history on the Station. Of course during my explore Mrs PowerSurge and Toddler PowerSurge went shopping with my debit card So on with my little report. Source of History:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Folkestone Harbour station was built to serve the port of Folkestone, and is one of three stations in the town. It is at the end of the short 1-in-30 gradient Folkestone Harbour Branch Line. The branch and harbour station provided a rail connection for boat trains from London which connected with the ferry services to Calais and Boulogne. The branch and station closed to regular passenger train services in 2001 although the line and station continued to be used by the Venice-Simplon Orient Express (VSOE) and railtours. As of March 2009 Network Rail intend to close the branch, and an association has formed to preserve it as a heritage line. The branch line was built in 1844 leaving the main line at Folkestone Junction and was double tracked ending with a viaduct across the harbour itself. In 1847 a swing bridge allowed the line to reach the southern pier and in 1848 the line was passed by the Board of Trade for passenger use. The line was electrified at the same time as the main line during the "Kent Coast Electrification - Stage 2" in June 1961, and passenger trains were formed of Electric multiple units. Freight services were withdrawn on 17 August 1968. In 1994, the opening of the Channel Tunnel led to the majority of ferry operators moving to other ports in the South East, with the result that only two services per day were arriving at Folkestone Harbour, to connect with the Hoverspeed SeaCat services. When these were moved to Ramsgate, Folkestone Harbour the station closed to ordinary rail traffic in 2001. Sometime after 2001 the line was turned into just a single track. The proposals for the regeneration of the Harbour area will see additional accommodation built; however, it has been determined that this will not be sufficient to justify reopening the rail link to the Harbour. Due to its infrequent use it has been proposed that Folkestone Harbour be closed permanently, the viaduct demolished, and the track on the rail spur lifted. On 12 April 2008, a closure ceremony, together with an official last train took place. However, objections had been raised by English, Welsh and Scottish Railway, Department for transport and Southeastern. During 2008 VSOE still used Folkestone Harbour with its last train travelling on 13 November, and a number of rail tours visited the branch. Advertised as the last train, a steam hauled rail tour visited the branch on 14 March 2009. Reliant on closure of the line, a proposed Folkestone Harbour and Seafront Master plan included plans to demolish the viaduct to make way for a new marina. An association opposing the closure was formed, with the primary aim of gaining control of the branch either through purchase or a lease with an option to buy. The group, called the Remembrance Line Association proposes turning it into a mainline connected heritage railway, a 'Leaving for War' museum and a memorial dedicated to the troops that arrived on trains to the branch and left on ships to fight in both World War I and World War II. It also proposes hosting regular national railtours to the branch, and would permanently operate a tourist shuttle service up and down the 1in30 gradient, utilising its own rolling stock and locomotives. Further plans include a revived passenger ferry to Boulogne. On Sunday 21 December 2008 the Remembrance Line Association ran a railtour to the branch using the Southern Railway preserved diesel electric Class 201 No. 1001. On 20 March 2009 Network Rail announced they had begun the formal process to close the line and station on cost grounds, having redeveloped Folkestone West with new waiting facilities for the VSOE passengers As I work on the railways and have a keen interest in Railway architecture it is very sad to think that this beautiful station might not be around for very much longer. I recognised a lot of its features from the Station I work at, and it felt like I had travelled back in time when I stepped onto that platform. You could almost imagine the romance of the Orient Express waiting at the station to whisk people away in style. And now for the pictures Good advice The Signal Box The Station itself Some of the old stairs Old and some new signalling equipment All the is left of the old tracks The Swing Bridge And now for a few Shots around the Harbour All in all it was a good day. Thanks to Oldie68 for giving up his time and showing me around.
  19. Myself and my friend D60 decided to go and have another look at Folkestone harbour, at least this time I had someone with a decent camera in tow. A little about the station: A branch line was built in 1844 leaving the main line at Folkestone Junction and was double tracked ending with a viaduct across the harbour itself. In 1847 a swing bridge allowed the line to reach the southern pier and in 1848 the line was passed by the Board of Trade for passenger use. The line was electrified at the same time as the main line during the "Kent Coast Electrification - Stage 2" in June 1961, and passenger trains were formed of Electric multiple units. Freight services were withdrawn on 17 August 1968. In 1994, the opening of the Channel Tunnel led to the majority of ferry operators moving to other ports in the South East, with the result that only two services per day were arriving at Folkestone Harbour, to connect with the Hoverspeed SeaCat services. When these were moved to Ramsgate, Folkestone Harbour the station closed to ordinary rail traffic in 2001. I really like this place, the only downside is the security, if you remain on the station/peir, all is good, but stray and he gets all upset Anyway, here are a few pics that D60 took. The more modern end of the station: The original part of the station used mainly for freight when in use: And the end of the Harbour wall:
  20. Myself and my bro, littlewide decided to have a look at the Road of Remembrance Bunker, I have passed this many times but never entered anything other that the ventilation room which is easy to enter. The main bunker is a little harder and involves some careful foot placement. I don/t know a lot about this place other than it was a Navel communication's centre. Overall its condition is very good, most of the vents remain in situ, with a fair amount of original woodwork and the remains of ww2 posters still on the walls in places. It consists of 4 main rooms connected by corridors a few toilets and other small rooms. Sorry about the pics, I must get a new camera.
  21. Originally found with Scrimshady, later revisited with Maniac and Swamp Donkey Taken point and shoot style with flash and auto focus like a true n00000b but we found cables near the door and thinking they were to a pir sensor (EDIT - There wasn't actually a PiR sensor ) we wanted to get out sharpish, and I couldnt leave with no photos at all. This is a live water service tunnel containing a pipe, and what looks like pumping equipment, it ran for maybe 300m then came to a larger room with steps up to a door, was possibly a reservoir. I think the tunnel may have continued but it required a bit of climbing and we decided to make a quick exit instead Sorry about the shite photos Interesting place, thats not been explored before and its always nice to find something new
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