Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'high'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 33 results

  1. UK British Gas, Leeds. July 2016

    The Explore. This was the first stop off on our 24 hour road trip, celebrating @Redhunter's birthday with @TheVampiricSquid, @CuriousityKilledTheCat and a non OS member. After spending the day before shooting a wedding, and having no sleep since 7am... we set off for the midlands at midnight to pick hun up, Then up to leeds.... After a long ass drive, silly o'clock McDonald's, copious amounts of energy drink, reversing around an island in a service station we finally arrived at about 4-4:30 am and met up with a few more people. We reached the top in time for a dissapointing sunrise.... but the views made up of it! The rest of the building has been pretty trashed now, and set fire to, but they still made some interesting photos Enjoy Thanks For Looking
  2. A cool night of climbing in Sheff with @-Raz- and a none member Butters Taken from the roof of Park Hill Flats Bit of History; The Cathedral Church of St Marie is the Roman Catholic cathedral in Sheffield, England. It lies in a slightly hidden location, just off the main shopping street in the city, but signals its presence with a 220ft tall spire. St Marie’s was completed in 1850 and opened on 11 September. Building the church cost more than £10,500 – a huge sum in those days – and it was not until 1889 that the church was free from debt. The Parish of St Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley when Catholic diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation in 1850. In 1902 a new presbytery, now known as Cathedral House, was opened. During the Second World War a bomb blew out stained glass windows in the Blessed Sacrament chapel. The remaining windows were removed and stored in a shaft at Nunnery Colliery. The mine flooded during the war, the glass sunk in mud and drawings for re‑creating the windows were destroyed, however it was still possible to re-install the windows in 1947. When St Marie’s was re-ordered in 1970, following Vatican II, dark woodwork was removed and new lighting and benches were installed. In 1972, a new altar, allowing mass to be celebrated versus populum, was consecrated by Bishop Gerald Moverley, auxiliary Bishop of Leeds. The church building has been a Grade II listed building since 1973. On 30 May 1980 the new diocese of Hallam was created and St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Bishop Moverley was installed as its first bishop and served until his death in 1996. The Explore; So on a cold and windy Sunday night, having just ot my car back from repair, it was decided that this needed to be done. Parking on Park Hill we made our way to the roof for a quick warm up which turned out to be a cool down as it was fking freezing. A few quick shots from the top and we headed on down, but before leaving we popped our heads into the service tunnels, but i have a video of this so i'll leave that for another report Fast foward an hour, we are sat in McDonalds after having been foiled by passing pedestrians. Wolfing down burgers and sipping at those Vanilla Latte things they do which are simply brilliant! Enough about food. We arrive outside the church and its all quiet, so over the fence we go, pausing only on the other side for a man to pass by and we remain unnoticed. A few flights of stairs and we hit the roof, to find some people on the ground looking curiously at the fence, but they soon move on. Then came the punishing part, more ladders than i cared to count. Cold enough that your hards are numb within seconds and the higher we went the worse it got. As did the wind, as we neared the top we could feel the whole structure swaying beneath us in the breeze. Great fun. From the top we noticed 3 figures on a nearby rooftop, closer inspection reveals them to be the guys who were checking the Cathedral out as we were on the roof! Whoever you were boys, a pleasure to meet you And heres the pics; Thanks for looking
  3. The Visit Another one that has probably been covered many times on the forum but again as I'm new over here I thought its one of those that's always quite nice to see. Pretty standard explore really, nice and relaxed and no bother from the locals which is always nice The History High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is intricately decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease.
  4. Hello all, Recently realised i never did anything with my High Royds Photos. You all know the history so i wont bore you with that... Heres how it all played out; How I got a restraining order from a building... Cast your mind back to February... 2 years since the last report on High Royds and as conversion was well underway everyone thought the place was gone. Until one dark cold night when myself Raz and Ant took a mosey on over to see what was left and we were amazed to find that the admin building and a ward near the back of the site hadn't been touched. SWEET! So we waited till the weekend, and we retruned with the cameras. We spent a good few hours roaming around having a laugh until whilst stood in one of the corridoors we hear voices... and the owners of said voices come around the corner in their high vis and read us our rights. Great we've been arrested.... After a while the dickhead who had arrested us realised we weren't actually doing anything wrong and he backed off, called off the dog unit and left the decent officers to deal with us. After convincing them we were only there to take pictures, the officers took us over to the housing develpment office to speak with the lady in the showroom. As we walked in there was a couple speaking with her about buying a house, she took one look at the police, then at us filthy and clearly being detained, and they left. Ooops. With the development lady in tow, we went into the show house where we were made to apologise to the lady. She then left us alone with the cops, who wrote out restraining orders for the lot of us and then one of them walked over the brightest white carpet ive ever seen in muddy boots. "Looks like your not the only ones getting their wrists slapped today" He said looking at what he'd done. So we and the police made a quick exit before we were caught. So in one day, we were arrested, ruined a carpet, and got banned from entering the premises until Feb 2016 Photos; I apologise for some of the above photos if they make your eyes bleed... This was when i still thought HDR was cool. Sins of my youth Thanks for looking
  5. Much like my post on Grossinger's Resort from my first trip over, this is going to be quite text and photo heavy as it's one of those places which I had wanted to see for so long, and which really piqued my interest. Horace Mann High School in Gary, Indiana is the city's largest derelict school as well as one of it's most famous. It is on the shortlist of American high schools that graduated more than 75 classes of students during their lifetimes and was unique among schools in Gary, featuring landscaped gardens, multiple pools and gyms and even a large pond. All of this was the creation of innovative educator William Wirt who had a new vision for education in the city and in particular at Horace Mann. Construction began in 1918 and carried on in bits and pieces for a decade, before the grand opening in 1928. The building itself was actually a trio of buildings joined together, constructed in a classic tudor style. The main building boasted grand entranceways offset by white columns. The central building housed 48 classrooms as well as the senior staff's offices. It also contained two libraries, the auditorium, cafeteria, refectory, two gyms and two swimming pools (at the time the school was built both gyms and swimming pools were separated by gender). When the school opened it served everyone through Kindergarten to 12th Grade. The west building initially served Kindergarten through 3rd grade, but later it included the music department, ROTC headquarters, a general shop, and additional classrooms and offices. The west building would also host the school’s new modern gymnasium, which was added to the rear of the building later in 1985. The east building was largely administrative offices and contained the school’s printing department in the basement. By 1937 the staff at Horace Mann had increased to 80 while enrollment had grown to 2,386. The school’s athletic program had enjoyed some success during this time, producing one of the school’s most famous alums in Tom Harmon. The student base continued to grow, and by 1956 Horace Mann boasted an enrollment of 2,597 – greater than the school’s designed capacity. Overcrowding would soon force the school to split. In 1958 the wooded area in front of the school was cleared, the land flattened, and a new school–the John H. Vohr Elementary–was built in its place. When Horace Mann opened it's doors in 1928, it was an all-white school. It was slow to de-segregate, and the construction of all-black schools during that period only lessened the apparent need for it to do so. By the 1960s the school was integrated, but still overcrowded, and this exacerbated the racial tensions existing in the city at the time. When Gary's first black mayor was elected in 1967, it started what became known as 'white flight', as tens of thousands of white citizens moved away from Gary. The population of the city dwindled as did enrolment at Horace Mann - in the 1950s the school was 100% white. By the time it shut it's doors in 2004, 98% of the students were black and 2% latino. In 2003, numerous schools were proposed for closure and first on the list were those running way below capacity. This included Horace Mann, which by that time only had 546 students on it's books - 1/5 of it's maximum capacity. Horace Mann closed for good on June 10th, 2004 following a closing ceremony held by old students, teachers and other supporters who had lobbied to keep the school open. The final class of 2004 yielded 72 proud graduates. Horace Mann High School still sits derelict and decaying eleven years after it closed it's doors. During that time it has been heavily vandalised, but the school is still a seriously impressive sight. It's in much the same condition as the old Liege Mechanics Institute and indeed feels like that in certain parts, with so many laboratories and long corridors. We arrived in Gary at about 9am one Sunday morning and immediately realised that there was some kind of event taking place on the old playing field behind the school. Lots of cars turning up and pickup trucks with smokers and barbecues and suchlike being taken onto the field. Luckily the access point is nowhere near the field so we got in undisturbed and spent a number of hours wandering the huge school. After leaving we asked one of the locals what was going on, and we were stunned when he replied 'it's a school reunion'. It was then we saw all the middle-aged men and women walking down the street wearing 'Horace Mann' t-shirts! Personally I couldn't believe our timing, of all the days to show up and explore a school it had to be then. 'Horace Mann Class of 2015' Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659207846808
  6. Ok wanted to see this for a while so at 2 am decided to go look. Visited with acid reflux even though he stayed in car has he was shattered and stranton. Explore. Ok work is well on way here with lots of the building ripped up and several outside buildings now rubble. But most was still here. Was a wonderful explore and had some really nice features. However due to time never got to see has much has i would have liked but hell atleast i saw what was left. The computer room with headphones is sadly gone also much of the other stuff is also gone. I was late to party on this . Nevermind was still worth the look. History. Leeds Girls' High School (LGHS) was an independent, selective, fee-paying school for girls aged 3–18 founded in 1876 in Headingley, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It merged with Leeds Grammar School in 2005 to form The Grammar School at Leeds. LGHS was founded in 1876, at a time when female education was limited but expanding. Frances Lupton and other members of the Ladies’ Honorary Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education decided that campaigning for access to the universities was of little use without better all-round education for girls, equivalent to what boys received at traditional academic grammar school. Established interests prevented the use of existing charitable funds, so Lupton and her colleagues created a new way forward: a joint stock company. The school motto was Age Quod Agis, which means "do what you do". While seemingly tautological at first glance, it is in fact a corruption of the Biblical exhortation, "whatsoever thy turn thy hand to, do it with all thy might". The pupils were divided into four houses, named after the four patron saints of the United Kingdom: Andrew, David, George and Patrick. Girls were placed into the houses that their families had been in before them. There were various house competitions throughout the year, mainly sports and arts orientated, the main one being the house music competition during the spring term. The school had three sections situated in the western suburbs of Headingley: Infant School (Rose Court): 3 to 7-year-olds Junior School (Ford House): 7 to 11-year-olds Senior School: 11 to 18-year-olds The Infant School (Rose Court) was situated on the large Senior School site on Headingley Lane, while the Junior School (Ford House) operated 1 mile (1.6 km) down the road in a converted mansion house. The Senior School building was built in the early 1900s, and efforts are currently being made to have the building listed. The fine oak wood panelling in the Assembly Hall detailed where Old Girls went to university on completion of their education at LGHS. The furniture within the Senior School Library was designed by Robert Thompson (The Mouseman), but was sold when the school moved to Alwoodley Gates (the Leeds Grammar School site). In 2004 LGHS was the highest performing school within the Leeds LEA area, achieving top results at both GCSE and A Level. In 2005 LGHS merged with Leeds Grammar School to form the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL). The merged school administration took over LGHS in August 2005, however the schools did not physically merge until September 2008. At that time the Junior School (ages 7–11) and Senior School (ages 11–18) moved to Alwoodley Gates. Classes for girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 16 remain segregated, but all extracurricular activities are mixed. The Infant School moved to the Ford House building next to a new nursery school, currently operating as GSAL'S Rose Court Nursery and Pre-Prep. The school building was used as a filming location for the fictional St Matthews' Hospital in the new ITV medical drama Monroe, which was scheduled for broadcast in 2011. Pics: Fake lift lol Last of the computer desks Fellow explorers Guess some people are not fans of a certain other site or some of there people. And Acid couldn't give a fook lol. Would put a pic up but do-sent deserve a spot on my pics lol. But sure those who have been have seen the black board. But enjoy this pic instead. Ok hope you all enjoy sorry diden't get the door shot somehow we missed it has it was total darkness lol. Thanks for looking all
  7. Here is a nice one for you to enjoy. Explore: This was so bloody funny. The place is a dog walkers and watchers paradise its very live lets just say that. Went with acid reflux and stranton. We did a look round and all looked lost has its a bit fort knox and people looking outa houses etc lol. Me and stranton decided not to give up and went all round building at one stage ending up at a secaa building on a separate site lol. Anyways it looked lost until the last spot payed off. So we then did the crazy and slept in acids car till 6 am ish. I say sleep but other than the cramp and the noise of the back seat Cough Stranton snoring lmao. It was not the greatest but still grabbed an hour or so. And then up we got mist in background and more bloody dog walkers lmfao. Take a bloody break. Anyways in we went and it was awesome. History. High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital closed in 2003 and the site has since been developed for residential use, some of which is in the old hospital buildings. In its final years of operation, High Royds had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice.[according to whom?] As part of Leeds Mental Health's £47 million reprovision process it was closed, with the wards being relocated to various community mental health units within the city of Leeds in the three years leading up to its closure. These include the Becklin Centre in St James' Hospital and the Mount in the city centre. The hospital was closed in stages between 25 February 2003 and June of the same year. As of 2011, the site was being redeveloped as a new village, also called High Royds, retaining some features of the hospital such as the ballroom and the clock tower. Since its closure, the site has been used as a film set for the film Asylum, as well as for the successful television series No Angels and Bodies. The drama Diamond Geezer starring David Jason which aired on ITV1 in March 2005 was also partly shot at High Royds. Leeds band Kaiser Chiefs have written a song ("Highroyds") about the former hospital. Three of the band (Nick Hodgson, Nick 'Peanut' Baines and Simon Rix) used to attend St. Mary's Catholic High School, the school that faces High Royds Hospital. The band Kasabian named their third album, West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum [sic], after the hospital after hearing about it on a TV documentary. Pics: Nice roof Some misty roof shots. Slabs Hope you all liked this and many thanks for looking.
  8. UK Minories, London - Sept 15

    Visited with The_Raw, ExtremeIroning, Raz and Jamie_P Setting the scene; 5 people, 1 206, a huge squash. After exiting my clown car which was clearly not designed for more than 3 people (French so i guess i expect too much) we jumped the wall, shimmied the scaff, over a fence and we were in... or we thought we were... secca come running over while we make our hasty escape. Fast forward 3 hours and we are back, after doing another location ready for another crack. Mr secca had tried to be clever by securing the helus, but had failed to note the ladder like fence next to it... how proffessional. So over it we went and up the steps. Tiring but so worth it, I dont know which took my breath away the most, the stairs or the view. I could have stayed up there all night but alas eventually we had to leave in order to go to the Kent meet up. Heres what i got; Raz taking it all in... If you got this far, thanks for looking
  9. Massive thanks to The_Raw and ExtremeIroning for showing us this one!! Well worth the 4 hour drive from T'old Yorkshire to the big city! Explored with Raz, Jamie, Damo and Michael the night before the Kent Meet up. From what I can gather Angel Court is a 70's design high rise office block which has recently been pulled down to replace the old style concrete floors with the new alloy light weight stuff. Its situated in the middle of a construction site in the heart of the financial district (I think...) So After a 4 hour drive from Yorkshire straight from work we met Damo and Michael and first of all we tried a block of flats only to be confronted by a rather rude and aggressive resident. So down we made a quick exit and i spent the next 20 mins trying to navigate the chaos of London city centre roads for the first time. Found somewhere to park and then managed to get pretty lost and walk around 3 miles more than we should have done (Burned off my MacDonalds so thanks for that guys ) we arrived at Angel Court. At first i was convinced that 5 of us were not going to sneak into this site but alas we did, starting with Michael scaling the fence and making it a little easier for the rest. Far too many steps in here Only spent half hour or so at the top as we were pushed for time but heres what i got; Thanks for looking
  10. Please be aware most of what you will see below has now been demolished Explored with -Raz- & a non member. As always a bit of background; Castle Market is a former indoor market in Sheffield city centre, England. The building lies in the north east of the present city centre, by the River Don, and is built on top of the remains of Sheffield Castle, which can still be seen via guided tours. The market closed in 2013 when the Moor Market opened on The Moor, further south in Sheffield city centre. The oldest part of the building is the Fish and Vegetable Market, constructed in the inter-war period. The remainder of the building was constructed by J. L. Womersley and Andrew Darbyshire between 1960 and 1965. It has two main floors, both of which included small shops and stalls, and each accessible from street level. Other stores faced on to the surrounding streets, while a gallery found a storey above the main part of the market contained several more shops, and access to an office building surmounting the structure. The gallery is linked by bridges across Exchange Street to further above-ground shopping areas. The Explore; On a very busy street so after a while of waiting around and a lot of cigs we took the first break in traffic and people and hopped in. Having been there a few weeks earlier we were shocked to see the whole centeral section of the market had been pulled down leaving the place with a very uneasy windy feel to it. We go lost pretty quickly as everything looked different but soon found ourselves on the stairs en route to the roof. Photos galore; While up there we were joined by a metal fairy (comes at night and robs you blind) who was hammering away below us, leaving us trapped on the roof. He eventually found us and he was friendly enough for a drug nut on the tag stealing copper in the dead of night... We exchanged a few words and then made a hasty retreat as we were not enjoying the thought of being tied to his theiving if we were caught. Photos from previous visit; If you got this far, thank for reading
  11. Arriving in the centre of Belval in Luxembourg, one can not help but look up at the huge blast furnaces which dominate the skyline. Ultra-modern high-rises and new-builds butted up against these giants are dwarfed. Looking at the building site at the base, we glance at each other.... "We NEED to go up there!" we agree. The Blast Furnaces - Image stolen from Google. We park up the car, check in at the Ibis, then head to some Buffalo place for a good helping of meat and a few beers while it got dark. Following a brief squabble about the size of the tip we head back outside and behold the monstrous marvels illuminated in the night sky and head straight for them! The steel works has long closed, but the Belval Blast Furnaces have not only been retained, but have been fully restored, coated with pretty paint and made into a visitor attraction. The new buildings at the base, presumably a visitor centre, were nearing completion and the towers will soon be open to the public. Mid-restoration as seen on Google Streetview: Being explorers, we weren't prepared to wait for the towers to open, or to pay for a guided tour during the day! We venture into the building site to check out the bottom of the furnace towers and discover the only way up is through the new buildings. Luckily we soon find our way to the roof where the 80 metre twisting and winding staircase begins. Being careful to stay out of the lights that illuminate the structure we make our way to the top. This unplanned adventure with with Proj3ct M4yh3m turned out to be a highlight of the trip. I'd opted to take my 24-105mm lens, whereas Mr Mayhem went for the 16-35mm wide angle. I kind of regretted not taking my wide angle, but should make for an interesting variation in shots. The lights in the old industrial structure provided some fantastic opportunities for shots and the view over the other blast furnace was amazing. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  12. Just interested what you lot think of people doing these crazy climbs. I must take some serious balls to to this no ropes or anything.
  13. UK London - May - 2015

    sooo i went to london last weekend and flashed a skyscraper, first time for everything, me and the gherkin compared gherkins, needless to say the gherkins gherkin was massive so i put my clothes back on, and sheepishly went back to my bottle of sailor jerrys. My excuse is it was bloody cold and i didn't have my long johns on prior to said gherkin comparison, i've left the bare faced cheek out for now as i dont think the forum can afford to provide bleach for every poor sod who sees it. Anyway i did however also take a few shots of our fair capital without any bums in. ill keep it short and hopefully sweet... cant wait to do more high stuff in london, one of those things where a picture doesn't ever do it justice compared to actuaslly standing there and being surrounded by all that awesomeness!, thanks to raw n slaya for having me!
  14. Finally got back to see the parts that i missed. Visited this time with Paul 2129 off 28DL. Managed to have a good look around on this occasion and covered all we wanted to see. Really glad i got back for another look, there is some awesome stuff to see in here. The corridors look spooky as hell in the early light High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is intricately decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, the High Royds Hospital Railway, but this was closed in 1951. In its final years of operation, High Royds had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. As part of Leeds Mental Health's £47 million reprovision process it was closed, with the wards being relocated to various community mental health units within the city of Leeds in the three years leading up to its closure. These include the Becklin Centre in St James' Hospital and the Mount in the city centre. The hospital was closed in stages between 25 February 2003 and June of the same year. 1 2 3 4/5 6/7 8 9/10 11 12 13/14 15 16 17/18 19/20 Thanks For Looking
  15. UK High Royds Asylum - April 2015

    A little history, shamelessly stole from Wiki! High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital closed in 2003 and the site has since been developed for residential use, some of which is in the old hospital buildings. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards.[citation needed] The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, the High Royds Hospital Railway, but this was closed in 1951 The explore was quite good actually, this is the only Asylum I have been in where I got a real feel of it. It felt like an Asylum, not just looked like one. Strange noises, wet footprints in the middle of rooms and none anywhere else all added to it. I must say the place was stunning and as I had got my ticket for the tour bus I was now at the location intended haha! Everywhere there were beautiful tiled floors, ornate woodwork, stunning celings. It is crammed with stuff to see. And the hall, well that was a belter too, the decay is starting to have quite an effect in there now. Personally I loved the little windows above the split corridor. They are a thing of beauty! Met Sweetpea & Dirty Jigsaw whilst we were there, good to see you guys! Anyway, on with the pics! Picture heavy as always lol Nice little staircase And another The stunning hall Sorry about this shot, I was using my wide angle and it blurred it. This was one of my favourite bits from the safe in what I think was the post office Those beautiful windows Clocktower The external
  16. Visited this place in February with Urblex. An unexpected mooch that was cut savagely short by the arrival of the police. Looking at the times on my photographs i'd say we where in there for about 15 mins. Oh well, at least we got out and away without incident. Nice looking place what we seen of it. The clock tower looks awesome and imposing as you approach. Quite a busy area we found with residents/workman/dog walkers, maybe during the week was not the best time:p High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is intricately decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, the High Royds Hospital Railway, but this was closed in 1951. In its final years of operation, High Royds had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. As part of Leeds Mental Health's £47 million reprovision process it was closed, with the wards being relocated to various community mental health units within the city of Leeds in the three years leading up to its closure. These include the Becklin Centre in St James' Hospital and the Mount in the city centre. The hospital was closed in stages between 25 February 2003 and June of the same year. Part of the hospital that has been converted. Thanks for looking.
  17. UK High Royds - 2015

    Wish i went here a long time ago, would of been great to seen it all!. High Royds hospital is a now-closed psychiatric hospital in the village of Menston, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It was first opened on 8 October 1888, as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum, and was closed on 25 February 2003. A truly magnificent example of Vickers Edwards architecture, it is arguably the finest example of the broad arrow layout. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, is now considered something of a show piece at the former hospital, which is situated on a 300 acre site at the foot of Rombalds Moor. Since its closure, the site has been used as a film set for the film Asylum, as well as for the television series No Angels and Bodies. a couple of group shots! Thanks for looking
  18. Hi Guys not posted in a long while so her is one from me now The History, LGHS was founded in 1876, at a time when female education was limited but expanding. Frances Lupton and other members of the Ladies’ Honorary Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education decided that campaigning for access to the universities was of little use without better all-round education for girls, equivalent to what boys received at traditional academic grammar school. In 2005 LGHS merged with Leeds Grammar School to form the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL). The merged school administration took over LGHS in August 2005, however the schools did not physically merge until September 2008. Hope you like
  19. UK High Royds - Feb 2015

    This post is a bit late but only just got round to editing the pictures so my apologies. We decided to take a trip in February to High Royd which didn't have a good ending. The day started off well, we managed to get inside fairly easily. We had a good look round downstairs but didn't get to see much of upstairs as our trip was quickly ruined by the words 'Police Stop'!!!!!!!! Managed to get myself an urbex ban and i am now banned from the property unless i want to buy a house there lol. I don't know anyone who would want to live in that place but anyway let me know what you think and leave a comment. Thanks Visited with: -Raz- #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11
  20. In the heart of Essex this little school has gone unnoticed for some time. Done some research on it and found out that it is to be converted in to 11 luxury apartments. It opened in the early 1900's served as a school for some time before closing a while ago. It still has a lot of character. I loved it. The hall was absolutely amazing, walked in and just stopped. I have never seen anything so beautiful. I must admit that wasn't what I expected from the outside. You can see that some bits have started to be stripped, I got here a little too late for that but I am pretty pleased none the less.
  21. Hello OS. I've done a report on this place already, I know.. But there's a few photos I didn't add and i've had a few more visits since then (I can't keep away). Demolition here is well underway and it won't be long until all of the disused areas are just waste, and I'm pretty sad to see this go really, I can't even count how many times I've been, just to go and see if i can find anything new and sadly, most of the best parts are now gone. Pretty much every visit with AndyK/Behind Closed Doors. A quality location altogether, plenty to see History: The origins of the company lie with two brothers, Henri and Camille Dreyfus. In 1912 they set up "Cellonit Gesellschaft Dreyfus and Co" in Basel, Switzerland. In 1916 the brothers were invited to live in Britain by the British Government, to produce their recently developed cellulose acetate dope for the war effort; the canvas skins of aircraft of the time were sealed and made taut with nitrocellulose dope, which was easily ignited by bullets. They developed the necessary plant and "British Cellulose and Chemical Manufacturing Co" was registered on March 18, 1916. The British Government patented the process developed by Henri Dreyfus, which lowered the costs of acetic anhydride production, an important reagent in the production of cellulose acetate. At the end of World War I, the British Government cancelled all contracts and the company changed to produce acetate fibres. In 1923 the company name was changed to British Celanese Ltd, a contraction of cellulose and ease. Softer and stronger, as well as being cheaper to produce than other fabrics used at the time such as satin or taffeta, Celanese was used in the production of garments. British Celanese was the first factory in Britain to produce propylene and from it isopropyl alcohol and acetone in 1942. Clarifoil production developed out of cellulose acetate yarn technology. Clarifoil full-scale production commenced from 1947. Henri Dreyfus died in 1944. Camille Dreyfus died in 1956. In 1957, British Celanese was taken over by Courtaulds. The site is now operated by Celanese. The plant finally closed after the last shift on Wednesday 14th November 2012. Pics: Couple from the night visit: Bye! Cheers for looking
  22. Hi =] Been meaning to check this place out for awhile and finally got round to it last weekend! The subway is almost all that's left from Crystal Palace High Level Station, a terminus on a now destroyed line, which lead directly into the back of the Crystal Palace. Passenger numbers fell after the destruction of the palace and the station was finally knocked down in the 60's. The subway survived the fire that destroyed the palace and was used as an air raid shelter during the war. Since then it's been for the most part inaccessible due to health and safety concerns and took a little bit of ingenuity to get down there. :] Not really quite as much fun but I understand there will be a small raffle to get access for London Open House next month. Looking down on the courtyard on the park side of the subway. One of the stairwells downwards. Looking out at the courtyard. The subway. Looking out towards park. Celing detail. Station side entrance to the subway, had a laugh trying to squeeze thru a gap here while some kids laughed at me from house opposite. Original retaining wall where the tracks would've once run. Here's the Paxton tunnel going under Sydenham Hill, was seriously locked up so not getting in here anytime soon. ;/ Understand the other side is bricked up and a tunnel further down the line is similar, but need to check it out sometime in case. Just a small explore but really enjoyed it none the less. Have my full set up on my website, Thanks for looking. :]
  23. Belgium Revisit Rooftop Antwerp ( 26/07/14)

    I really love this location and construction will soon be finished, so I went back to take some more pictures Rooftop Antwerp by Vancolen Photography, on Flickr Rooftop Antwerp by Vancolen Photography, on Flickr Little clip : http://youtu.be/bp4E8tDzhk4
  24. I travelled up to York for a wedding last week so decided to make the most of my time oop north and spent a couple of days in Sheffield. I visited the courts with Acid- Reflux who was kind enough to revisit the place on my behalf. Seeing as I had my suit with me I figured it would be rude if I didn't wear it in court. The policeman's hat was a last minute idea I had as I walked past a fancy dress shop the day before. Credit goes to Acid- Reflux for taking those shots I have to say this place is pretty spectacular, it's unbelievable to see all those beautiful mahogany court rooms and that staircase laying to waste. We were surprised to be the only visitors for the duration, I realise a lot of people have reported on this spot recently so I hope my take on it adds something a bit different. The History: Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk (most at risk of becoming the most over-explored building in the UK perhaps?). Exterior Cell block Court Rooms It was him.... It wasn't me.... The Stairs Other bits and pieces Clock Tower
  25. This is a variety of images that were lost due to photobucket. So to keep it simple I have mashed all the climbing stuff we have done In Norwich into 1 thread Carrow road crane John Innes crane Norwich Rooftops University of East Anglia Crane Norwich Gas tower St Giles st Church
×