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Found 133 results

  1. UK College Labs - Wye - Kent - August 2017

    Soooooo after seeing a couple of reports go up recently covering this part of the old college, and tried previously on numerous attempts with no avail a few years ago when we managed the sports hall and Withersdane Hall parts, i decided now was the time to return and have another go. Credit to whoever put this part on the achievable list as previous to this outing security had always patrolled and none of us could ever find a way in. Fast forward to some overcast late morning, i asked @starlight if she was up for having another look round the place, knowing she had also been for a look but not manged this part either. We hooked up and set off just down the road to this place which is very close to where im usually lurking. History of the college: Which im sure you have all read in other reports of this place... The College of St Gregory and St Martin at Wye, more commonly known as Wye College, was an educational institution in the small village of Wye, Kent, England, 60 miles (100 km) east of London in the North Downs area. ... The college was officially closed by its then owner, Imperial College London, in September 2009. Founded in 1447 by John Kempe, the Archbishop of York, as a college for the training of priests, in 1894, the school moved to new premises, and the South Eastern Agricultural College was established in the buildings with Alfred Daniel Hall as principal. In 1898, Wye became a School of Agriculture within the University of London. Until 2005, Wye College was a well-known study and research centre in the fields of rural business and management, biological sciences, and the environment and agriculture. The college was officially closed by its then owner, Imperial College London, in September 2009. Today, buildings that formerly housed Wye College have been repurposed as the Mind Campus in Withersdane Hall, a substance abuse rehabilitation clinic, and Wye School, a school for children of year seven and up. The main campus and several other buildings have been owned by Telareal Trillium since 2015 who are developing a masterplan involving some new housing. I cant really say much about the actual wander around, it was non eventful as security really has been wound down since i was last here. It was extremely easy going and with a bit of improvisation and teamwork we managed to cover all of this section of buildings. As i think stated in previous reports, not much left in there but very clean suprisingly and the lecture hall was a highlight for me. Enjoy... Cheers for looking, blut.
  2. This ones been long in the planning, but eventually at some ungodly hour of the morning me and Brewtal managed to get inside and see the place for ourselves. It was a pretty brief visit by all accounts, but we managed to see most of the lower level. History Built as part of the now demolished Melville Barracks in Chatham. This deep shelter was a refuge for the marines at the barracks. The history is pretty vague, but I believe the tunnels existed before the start of WW2. In the early 1960s when the melville Barracks were demolished to make way for the council offices, and most of the tunnel entrances were sealed up. The Explore After a few weeks of planning me and Brewtal finally got round to visiting here. This one requires a little more caution as the entrance method is somewhat brazen. After a bit of head scratching we devised a plan and went for it. We were in! I'd be forewarned about the stairs, and everything said was absolutely right!. The wooden stairs are very rotten and very dangerous. Even when taking extra care, we had a few brown pants moments. Once at the bottom of the lower level we could relax and start exploring. The lower level is quite extensive and we saw as much as we could. Unfortunately we were fairly time limited, so we didn't mess around too much. I found the stairs going up to the upper levels, but decided against it this time. Re-visit for that one me thinks. It was refreshing to see no graffiti or vandalism. The access situation has protected it pretty well I suspect. Photos The bottom of the stairs. These were supposed to be the 'Ok' stairs. Dread to think what the 'bad' stairs were like. The stairs to the upper levels.
  3. Well here goes a first report on here since i joined in 2013, completely forgetting i had created an account so please accept my delayed apologies for being inactive... I visited this place in 2014, so a while ago now... hence why the pictures are how they are . After an epic road trip up north, we returned to our hometown and had an opportunity for something we had been working on for a while. Exhausted from lack of sleep and driving many miles, we were not going to miss this window of opportunity and visited the place before it was no longer doable. Really not sure on the history of the place, possibly built as wine vaults? Unable to find any records of it to be honest, it was really a right place at the right time thing. I believe it was at some point used as a youth club, then left vacant for a number of years and last i heard it was a gym. Unsure of the current situation, would like a revisit with the new camera and glass but beggars cant be choosers eh!! Visited with non members JDY and xcon2icon. Access at the time was a walk in the park, and ive not seen it posted before so hoping its something that isn't the monotonous same old stuff for people to look at either, despite the lack of decent pictures!! Really not the most exciting evening, no security, no nosy neighbors, no drama! Thanks for looking!!
  4. History The business was founded in 1922 and was the longest established producer of 100 per cent recycled newsprint and produced on average 400,000 tonnes of recycled newsprint every year from 500,000 tonnes of recycled waste fibre. On 23rd February 2015, the plant’s 300-strong workforce was dealt the shock blow that the firm, which had been running for nearly a century, would be applying to go into administration. The site has now been decommissioned, and the latest report to creditors suggests the mill itself will be demolished some time in mid-2017. The stock of paper was bought for £8.3m and a sale of the plant and machinery was completed in September for £7.9m by waste management firm W&S Recycling. Commercial director at W&S, Tony Knowles, said: “Over the last six months a considerable section of equipment has been sold for re-use including two 100-tonne pulping machines to an Egyptian client plus the complete PM14 newsprint manufacturing line, sold to Chinese clients. A total of 230 employees were made redundant. A further 60 were kept on temporarily to assist with the decommissioning of the site. Now just 10 people remain, to help dismantle the plant and machinery. Aerial picture showing how massive the site is Main admin building and offices, (these are alarmed by motion sensors as we found out) storage tanks chimneys The building as the very back houses the Pm13 and the at the back left houses the PM14 Fork trucks Kent-urbex & Begood News letter for staff of the PM14 Dismantling the PM14 PM14 machine A before picture This was the final stage of the paper where it was cut to size onto reels then onto the wrapping stage and stored. Before picture of it in action PM13 which we missed on out previous visit Pm13 and control panel Loads bays
  5. Benenden Hospital The Explore A couple of days before the Cliffe Forte meet me and @Urbexbandoned sat and did a bit of research of the area, i got distracted as usual by the internet because I am a man. @Urbexbandoned suggested this little gem and i'm glad she did. @Maniac and @Obscurity had reported on this place a few years ago and we liked the look of the place and wondered if anything was still there worth looking at. That frontage to the main building was attractive in itself, quite an unusual layout and looked more American in architectural design in my eyes. The prospect of corridors with single ward rooms branching off like we'd seen in their reports were unfortunately no more. A lot of these are now converted into hospital offices and the like, complete with human Doctors and shit. We had a walk around the site, then decided to enter the live hospital and walk around to see if anything derpy remained. After a wander around the live bit and a nice hospital poo each, we decided that the only way to get to the corridors was to walk through the live parts, head down, awkward smiles to staff and managed to wing it through to the only remaining abandoned corridor. Rather than finding them set up like small bedrooms like we'd seen in old reports, they appeared to be just patient archive rooms and shit like that. A bit disappointed to be honest so we grabbed a few shots and headed back out past the doctors and nurses again. Had a walk around the grounds and few a few other little buildings and the swimming pool, and these turned out to be a lot more interesting, one of the buildings having rooms packed full of shiny newish looking bed and expensive hospital equipment. Not like the NHS to waste money is it? Right, I've talked enough shite! The History Benenden Hospital was founded in 1907 in Benenden, Kent and became the centre for hospital treatment for members of Trade Unions and Friendly Societies and subsequently large numbers of public sector employees who joined what is now benenden health. The services provided at the hospital have moved with the times. From treatment for tuberculosis - which was its original role - to the management of chest diseases, to the current day where the hospital provides a wide range of consultation, diagnosis and treatment services for most medical and surgical specialties. In recent years the hospital has increasingly had patients who are not members of benenden health. Local National Health Service agencies are increasing their use of the hospital's facilities, as are patients who use private medical insurance or who pay directly for their own hospital care. The hospital provides a range of clinical services which are tailored to meet the needs of individual patients. The hospital has a Modern Matron 'a senior and experienced professional' who has the authority to resolve problems. The Pictures 1. 2/3. 4. 5. 6. Urbexbandoned 7. 8. After having my blood pressure taken by Urbexbandoned the reading unfortunately indicated I was dead 9. 10/11. 12. 13. I hadn't seen a Microfiche reader for a long time before finding this one.. 14. I'm not gonna bullshit you, I couldn't get into this building (not for the want of fucking trying), so this shot was through the window.. 15. Filing cabinet packed full of staff records and this one in particular contained a report on a staff member dismissed for getting a bit too touchy feely with a nurse... 16/17. Shitter/Lit corridor.. 18. Unfortunately no keys in the ignitions 19. Mangled.. Thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  6. Come and spend the tail end of the summer exploring, relaxing and having a good time in Kent. OK it is the arse end of England, but we've never had a proper big meet down here . . . . until now! I've been promising people for a long time that I would organise a meet in Kent, so here it is. Date is set as I can't really do many other weekends so apologies to those who can't make it. This will be an exploring meet staying in a nice location in the Kent countryside, we're not going to be stuck in a pub. Bring your own beer, food and something to sleep in. The venue will be announced via PM nearer the time as I have two in mind, both are in areas where there are other things to explore nearby so you can make a day of it and meet up in the evening. You won't necessarily need a tent as both venues have sheltered areas you can sleep in and places you can hang hammocks (you may need pitons thou) One venue has a lake next to it you can kayak in, both have areas we can rig a short pitch for rope techniques. So if you're interested say below and keep the 5th 6th September free! :-) There's no limit on numbers here and members old and new are equally welcome so if you've never attended a meet before, now's your chance to come and meet us all. This is a cross-forum explorers meet so they'll be members from other UE forums and Facebook. There's no limits to numbers really, but keep it to people you trust only. Maniac :-)
  7. Just joined up, but not new to the hobby I hail from East Kent and mostly do regular explores within Kent and the surrounding counties! I've mostly frequented DP in the past as well as Flickr and Youtube, but The Vampiric Squid suggested I join OS as you have a community of many fine explorers here! I've done some splores with a few people that are on here, top lads all of them I'm not much of a photographer, but I'm learning! Here's a shot of me from my most recent explore. Squid suggested that it would be a good idea if the first image you saw of me was me pretending to dissect a man's penis Urbex Vasectomy by Slim Jim, on Flickr Will whack up my first report sooner or later.
  8. Although this is my first Ubex site I have been taking pictures for a while, just looking for new and exciting locations to explore and record bws Nomad
  9. Well its been a few weeks since I posted, and about 6 weeks since I visited here with 3 exploring friends from various forums (Liam_CH, Els and a Bengley). I have wanted to crack this site for a very long time, so it was nice to get it done on a sunny April weekend The site is located in Sheerness, which is in the English county of Kent (East of London) and is looking a little worse for itself since its sudden 2012 closure which claimed 350 jobs. It has been sold out of administration but nothing has happened on the site and 3 and a half years later she sits decaying. The dust on site is something else and seems to consume everything! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157652260359969
  10. Not much to say about this one ,It was a Ragstone mine for building stone, probably 19th century,there has been much rumour of tunnels under this area and not much actual information ,seems it was opened up many years ago and surveyed after it had been sealed up in the 1960's,some evidence of later visits are visable but other than that it seems to have been forgotton about and became more rumour than fact in later years! Props to Obs for finding a way into this one
  11. I thought now would be a good time to kick off 2015 with my first report of the year After countless trips around the UK to visit various mines and quarries, it begged the question as to what is located closer to home as there must have been mining activity around Kent. Throughout the area there are extensive underground coal mines and their history is well documented with some of the topside sites now sitting abandoned. All coal mines were capped to prevent access and with obvious hazards like gases and lack of oxygen, these locations are not accessible nor are we able to explore them without some serious kit and knowledge of the risks associated. I have spent much time this year researching and searching for mines and quarries in Kent which may still be existent below our feet. Which is what leads me to this place. I started to find reference to chalk, sandstone, and ragstone workings across Kent although they are few and far between. Some years ago we had managed to successfully locate and explore an abandoned chalk mine at Manston and another much larger chalk mine at Eastry (both of which I believe have been reported on). Next I began to research the old ragstone workings located in Westerham and with various members and repeat trips we managed to explore most of the main workings. Next we moved into North Kent where I had been researching another large chalk mine, again we successfully gained entry and posted a report here. I am sure that there is more to be found with regard to mining activity in Kent although for me there was one last major piece of the puzzle. A sandstone mine based in Medway was the target. For years there had been talk of a set of tunnels based under Medway and there was even discussions on the forums about these tunnels that seemed to have disappeared with no trace. Although I had always been aware there was something there and had discussions with other explorers over the years, I had never put any real effort into finding them. I began to research the rumored tunnels and found a few interesting leads to investigate. I travelled up to Medway with a non-member Trav a couple of times and spent hours searching the area for any trace of an entrance to the underground workings. Eventually we had what we needed and made our way home to devise a plan. A few weeks later we returned to explore the underground workings and after a small amount of digging we managed to gain access. The last documented access to the mine was in the early 90’s although there was evidence that people have got in there since then due to graffiti in different areas and rubbish left lying around. Despite this we know that the place has not been accessed for a good few years and has almost become completely forgotten and lost. For those of you that don’t know any of the history:- Kent is not particularly well-endowed with underground stone quarries but ragstone was worked as a building material, at least since Roman times, and is used extensively throughout the county. In 1990 Kent Underground Research Group) got permission from Maidstone Borough Council to re-open the ragstone quarries in Mote Park. Maidstone, like East Surrey, has its legendary tunnels that run for improbable distances between impossible locations, which suggests the likelihood of substantial underground workings existing somewhere. The Mote Park quarries were sealed with a huge quantity of rubble and hardcore in the 1960s. The idea was to excavate the rubble out of the fissure until the expected open gallery was reached. The fissure had draughted strongly during digging operations, suggesting open passage existed not far away from the digging front. Access was finally gained on August 26th and what was seen were in many ways similar to the firestone workings in Surrey. There were probably about 1000 metres of passage, though not all of the mine was explored. It will be interesting to see how the workings compare with the East Surrey firestone quarries. Firestone was widely used for carvings and reasonably intricate decorative work in buildings such as churches. Ragstone was more often a basic building material, and did not usually lend itself to more than simple shaping, and was certainly not used for fine work to any real extent. Once inside the workings it was easy to see why the mine had been sealed years ago as we found it to be quite unstable and so we had to carefully navigate our way through crawl spaces without disturbing any unstable sections. After about 10minutes of crawling through tight gaps and over dead’s then we reached the main haulage route which was a lot larger in size and had been built up with walls of dead rocks to either side. I have now returned to the mine a number of times with various members in order to push on and explore all of the workings. I am confident that we have now covered the whole system and although there is little in the form of miner’s tools, rails, etc. We did find some large fossils, wooden props supporting the roof and natural fissures which were all nice to see and definitely made the explore worthwhile. Again, it just goes to show how rewarding this hobby can be when you put in the effort, research and persistence. Massive respect to Trav (non-member) for all the efforts he put into this one with me as he was on the case from the moment I mentioned the place, and to Hermy for helping us get in. Finally….here are some pictures for you to enjoy….
  12. Storm Relief Mine – Kent – Visited with two non-members So it has been quite a while since I last posted a report up, in fact this may be the first one this year but this is not through lack of trying just that a list has formed over time and sometimes things take time, effort and hard work for reward. The want and need to see the unknown is what drives us to push on and take risk of failure rather than follow a tourist trail of posted locations. So that brings us on to this location, and to really do the report justice then I want to try to try to set the scene and explain the events which are all factors of an explore that you really don’t feel from a collection of photos and a computer. Anyone who speaks to me or the group I circulate with will know that earlier this year I sustained a bad injury and was told I may be permanently disabled and unable to walk. After 7ish years of exploring and visiting these places I finally got a very much really wake-up-call that there is danger and risk in what we do and you can really pay a price if not careful. I was asked if this would cause me to stop exploring but I don’t think it is really a hobby, to me it is a lifestyle and an inbuilt instinct to want to see what is hidden and forbidden!! By the point of my injury between my local crew we had pretty much ticked all our little projects and possibilities off of the list, but that is not to say that there is not more to be unearthed, it just means that you need to start digging deeper. For the past months while recovering then time was spent researching and checking on possibilities in anticipation that if recovered, I could enjoy the reward, along with those I explore with. That’s not to say that I didn’t continue to get out and can only thank friends from the scene for making this possible, Pushing me and my wheelchair around disused hospitals, Getting me and my crutches down deep shelters for parties!! This is all really just the background of events leading on to the night of the explore. I had begun looking at a few leads which had been circulating on local locations and found reference to this place. I had never heard mention of the location before and to the best of my knowledge then the last documented and likely visitors were workers who exposed the capped mine in the late ‘80’s. After discussing this new possible location with a non-member then trips were made across Kent in search of trace of the site and to verify the information and my workings of exactly where and how it could be accessed. Without trying to give away access information, entry involved a large shaft in a very lively location meaning there was little chance of being able to just sneak in…. We had managed to locate our entrance exactly where we believed it to be and managed to gain entry down the shaft to check we could access the mine but were unable to explore it at this time and knew a better plan would need to be devised if we wanted to have a good run of the place. Fast forward a couple of weeks and here we are again, visible to all but trying hard to blend in as we prepared to enter the mine. One by one we quickly gained entry to the shaft and began the descent down the ladders and platforms approximately 80ft into darkness. We were unsure of whether we had drawn the wrong attention or whether we would be able to get out again without being busted but now it was too late, we were in, we were committed and so game on!! As for a bit of history about the location:- Towards the end of the 19th century, a large number of brickfield’s were in operation around the suburbs of London and kent to supply growing demand for building materials as towns and cities expanded rapidly. The brickfield’s were popping up everywhere and anywhere that a suitable clay could be found to produce yellow brick. During the manufacture process of the yellow brick then a percentage of chalk would be added to prevent the brick from cracking during the heating process and to achieve the correct colour of brick. The brickfields wanted a supply of chalk as close as possible to their site, usually from a local quarry but this was not always possible. This meant that it became mush more common for shafts to be sunk into the floor through layers of chalk thus providing a starting point for mining activities. Mines were dug in various areas to provide the brickfield’s. The mine ceased operation around 1915 but was not sealed off. Workmen rediscovered the mine some 5 years later when they drove a small tunnel through the well shaft within the mine to be used as a drain for surface water and storm water which flows into the well shaft and thus converted the shaft and mine into a large storm overflow tank. You can see in the photos the water mark on the walls showing how much the place has filled at times. The shafts had been capped off shortly after and the land had been used as a tip for road sweepings. By the 1980s the land had been sold for development but for this to happen then they needed to gain access to the sealed mine workings to check the accuracy of their information and plans. The mine had remained in a very good condition and the tunnels had been dug using pillar and stall mining. The roof height of the passages ranges between about 7 – 10 m high throughout the mine. There is in total approximately 400m of underground passages all of which are still accessible. Coming down the shaft we could feel the density of the air increase and the temperature rising as we climbed down into the darkness. Water pouring from above was ice cold and rumbled down the shaft like thunder. Finally at the base we stopped for breath… Moving across the remains of a metal gantry the shaft continued below us but full of water, we crouched through the small access tunnel to what I can only really describe as breath taking. The scale and size of the place really was amazing and I don’t think it can be done justice in photos but here is my humble offering, Enjoy… Thanks for looking
  13. Wasn't going to do a report seeing as how Woody covered it so nicely but it has been a while since my last report and i thought why not.Rumour has it that the place is locked up but doesn't sound like its been locked officially either so really not sure of the state of play here! This did have a Casualty Clearing Station on its upper level which over the years caused rumours of it being an underground hospital,that and the fact there are so very many bunks in the place.It is a two level jobby with stairs leading further up to an old entrance,these stairs are in short rotten and in no way could you put full weight onto them without much crashing of wood coming down the many flights of stairs to the bottom so it was a case of climb on the framework of the stairs to get about. got wind of this when a few private pics went up and between us worked out where what and how..so off we popped,Visited with The Wickerman & obscurity.. some pics..there all pretty samey but it is a nice old explore Sorry about the amount of pics..well tbh im not sorry at all Another report rehosted from photocuntbucket to flcikr
  14. UK Cliffe Fort, Kent. Sept '14

    Built in the 1860s, Cliffe Fort was designed to protect the Thames from invasion. It was armed with 12.5-inch 38-ton and 11-inch 25-ton rifled muzzle-loading guns. Protection of these guns was provided by granite-faced casemates with shields for added defence. The shields, casemates and the rails on which the gun carriages stood are all still visible today. Unfortunately, the place is flooded. I hope to return with a dinghy one day. These tracks were for a Brennan guided torpedo installed in 1890. The torpedo worked by coiling huge lengths of wire around the two propellers, pulling the wires to drive it forward, and controlling individual speed to change direction. It was used for twenty years before it was replaced by quick firing guns. And a nice ship wreck outside Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed
  15. visited with alanmowbs82 and captain_kid this culvert runs for about a mile and half, it has three different build techniques, prefab concrete rings, round victorian and egg shaped, I'm assuming that the downstream half of the culvert was changed from victorian brick to the concrete to accept an overflow pit from the main sewer (pic 4&5), although the floor into the overflow chamber wasn't particularly slippery so i'm assuming it doesn't see that much use 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. cheers for looking
  16. visited with alanmowbs82 this was the last of the dover shelters we needed to do, popped down for a quick look and sadly now all locked up again, apart from the fire damage it's still in pretty good nick and a few decent photo opportunities, history here: http://thetimechamber.co.uk/beta/sites/deep-shelters-air-raid-shelters/st-martins-battery-deep-shelter-dover 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. cheers for looking
  17. very nice little limestone mine in kent, unfortunately it has been backfilled in most places to leave about three foot headroom, which means a lot of crawling\ducking as you make your way round, not really that photogenic and it suffers from a bit of mist in places, further history here: www.kurg.org.uk/sites/limestone.htm 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. thanks for looking
  18. After one of the false starts trying to complete Fort Darnet (when we accidentally broke a part of the engine) Liam and me were stuck for something to do, so I suggested going here. I was aware of this place, it closed properly last year and following a report on another forum I thought it was high time I paid the place a visit so off we went. I've shamelessly stolen the history from the website of the company who are auctioning off all the equipment that's in there. You can read more here if you're interested. http://www.cjmasset.com/2013/08/merchant-bar-mill-located-at-queenborough-kent/ It is being stripped out quite fast, loads of the equipment was packed and labelled ready to go, but equally so there's a lot still there. It's only a small place really, just one massive shed, but as industry goes it's not bad at all. On with some photos. The front part is very stripped as that line has been dismantled ready to be sold. Loved this, mainly for the counterweight for the door. Now at this point I must add we had probably only been in the building for around 20 minutes, and had just entered a smaller space at the back with some big lathes and a load of boxed up machinery in. A timely glance towards the entrance and I saw a pair of legs walking in our direction, oh dear were we seen going in? Time was not on our side, and we had to find somewhere to hide pretty sharpish as he was getting close to where he would be able to see us. So we picked this blue shed. Yep, no door and full of the sort of noisy crap that you really don't want on the floor when you're trying not to make a noise. He passed us no more than 6 feet away , had he glanced back then he would have clearly seen me, but he didn't. We wait for 10 minutes, and cautiously exit our hiding place. The place appeared deserted again, and we walk around the section we were in taking a few more photos. Bits of metal still on the lathes, they really had just downed tools and left. Then Liam peers through a hole in the wall, and it was at that moment we realised the person was still in the building right at the other end from where we were, and he appeared to be re-arranging things - we had put the noises we could hear down to the fact the wind had picked up and the building wasn't exactly the most structurally intact ever. So we go and find somewhere else to loiter for a bit which turned out to be a store room full of mainly drive belts. 15 more minutes and we go and have another look, still there. We wait and we wait some more. Eventually we stop hearing noises and go for another look and hey presto this time the coast is clear and we can finish what we came to do. This was about the only shot I really wanted to get from the end of the machine looking back. And lastly on the way out, we pop into the control room. Was a funny few hours spent in here, and it started pissing it down while we were there so we got soaked through on the way back to the car. Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  19. A long overdue report from me, it's been a while, been having some time off exploring to do other things. However, an opportunity to go and explore this place presented itself the other day, it was too good not to go really. Fort Darnet is one of a pair of forts that were built in the 1800's on islands in the Medway estuary (the other being Hoo Fort). It was completed in 1871, but like a lot of these fortifications it never saw action and was disarmed before WW1. In WW2 it continued in use as an observation platform, and after that war it was abandoned and deliberately flooded. It was a bit of a mission to get here, we had several false starts over previous weeks trying to visit here, but eventually we made it. :-) We wanted to do both Hoo and Darnet fort, but the tide only allowed us to complete one of them so Darnet was the one we picked as it was slightly closer. You can only get to the lower parts of the fort on a boat. Sailing a little dinghy round an abandoned fort is a very surreal experience, you feel like you're discovering a lost kingdom somewhere, it was great fun! I must mention that the boat, engine and even the idea was Liams, although I've wanted to go here for a long time. Effectively I just tagged along and helped a bit with the navigation. I also must add that if you're planning to visit, FFS have a boat with an engine like we did. You will not out paddle the tidal flow in the estuary, it's very very fast and I'm not exaggerating. It's not very big really, but below are a selection of photos. Liam goes for a solo lap Nice view of Kingsnorth powerstation from the island Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  20. This is like the holy grail for all us Kent guys, I've been waitinga very long 4 years to get in here, Have lost count of the amount of times I had "dropped by" on the off chance of some one having made it possible but always to no avail, Id also eyed a particular possibility up a fair few times but had been Incorrectly informed that it was fruitless, Turned out it wasn't and some one else had the very same idea!!!!, Goes to show always go with your hunches! Right so on with some Pictures, PIC HEAVY ! A beautiful bit of original Graff, there's tons of it in here! Ill apologize for the sheer weight of Images, But I took hundreds and felt compelled to share!
  21. Much like everyone else Ive been itching to get in here for a very long time, Well an opportunity presented itself so I though hey why not, lets get down there! A selection of my pics from the night in Question A nice bit of Original Graff And looking up into a vent shaft Ill admit I was disappointed with my pics from the night, was all a bit rushed and as it seems to be of late way too many people about! Thanks for looking
  22. January 2012 350 members of staff at this Sheerness based steelworks made the usual morning trek to work only to find their jobs gone and their months wage-packet along with it. Thamesteel had gone into administration. Despite a small glimmer of hope for the former employees livelihoods in June last year, when a new company set up by the plants former owners (the Saudi-based Al-Tuwairqi Group) took over the site, Thamesteel has sat exactly as it was left. Tools literally down with rust already setting in between the thick layers of dust and pigeon crap. There are still around 250 outstanding unfair dismissal claims filed by Community Union on behalf of the staff who lost their jobs and ATG Chairman Dr Hilal Al-Tuwairqi has failed to respond to questions about their intentions for the land. It is estimated it could cost £30million to decontaminate the land but as the years continue to pass without news and the forces of time and nature enact their toll on the inert site it looks increasingly unlikely Thamesteel will ever reopen. Visited with my mate Oliver (aka Headflux) on a nippy February morning. Like many have commented before on past reports of this place the scale is truly astounding. I hadn't been exploring in something with this size and scope since the much missed Pyestock back in 2012 so it was quite a sight for sore eyes. Heard a couple horror stories about security with dogs and these I only found out about once I was already in the car, buckled up and on my way thus was unable to scrabble out the window and make my way back to the warm bed I had just dragged myself out of. Thankfully however the explore itself was quite a peaceful affair despite there still being a bit of activity in and around the buildings, with construction workers and forklifts using a couple of the buildings as a drive through shortcut to the one building that still appears to be in use. The skeletal remains of another of England's lost industries. An incredible explore.
  23. This was the one and only Deep Shelter at St Margaret's that I hadn't done, Mainly as in previous years I hadn't found it, I got a text from Space Invader saying he was at a loose end and did I fancy going and doing some thing local, I thought yeah why not so off we went and found ourselves here. A nice aerial shot of the site; A bit of history about the site, Its construction and the fire power employed; This was a coastal artillery battery with four Mark X 9.2 inch guns and a network of bunkers and ammunition stores, northeast of the lighthouse on the road to St Margarets. The site was cleared after the war, but traces remain albeit heavily overgrown. Excavations started on 28 December 1940 and the first gun arrived on 25 March 1941, although No. 4 gun was not test fired until 28 November of that year. Their best-known action came a few months later, on 12 February 1942, when the light battleships Gneisenau, Scharnhorst and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen attempted the Channel Dash from Brest back to Germany. The K band radar at South Foreland started to track the ships of the Brest Group coming up the Channel towards Cap Gris Nez. At 12:19, the first salvo was fired; since maximum visibility was five miles, there was no observation of fall of shot by either sight or radar. The "blips" of the K-set clearly showed the zig-zagging of the ships and full battery salvo firing began without verifying fall-of-shot. 33 rounds were fired at the German ships, which were moving out of range at 30 kn (35 mph; 56 km/h). Initially it was thought that four hits had been made, but the Germans revealed that all had missed. By the end of the war the four guns had expended 2,248 shells, most in the months before and after the Normandy landings. 28 enemy ships were confirmed sunk between all the coastal batteries around Dover and the deterrent effect was significant A couple of Original photos from when the site was in full operation And the pics taken from my visit to the Shelter Thanks for taking the time to look through my Pics, I had a great time visiting this place, I would Highly recommend going to experience it for yourselves ! !
  24. Another one of those that I've been wanting to do for years, It became common knowledge as to where the entrance was and after a tip off I thought it was high time I paid this last section a visit ! A little history about the Ramsgate ARP tunnel network; The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. And some of my pics from the visit On the 24th August 1940 Ramsgate received more than 500 bombs when a squadron of German aircraft were approaching Manston. Their leading aircraft was shot down over the harbour and in vengeance they decided to release their bombs over Ramsgate. This was the first air raid by the Germans on an unprotected town. On that fateful occasion countless lives were saved by an underground Air Raid Protection (A.R.P.) system of tunnels dug for the purpose. These tunnels extended for approximately 2½ miles around the town with 11 entrances at strategic points providing refuge within 5 minutes walk of most areas. A 1500 yard long former railway tunnel was also used and linked to the A.R.P. system. The tunnels were equipped with chemical toilets, bunk beds, seating, lighting and a loud speaker system. Many people took up residence below ground having lost their homes above. Others used them just for shelter or to move around town during a raid. And finally a nice bit of original Graff that I spotted despite running around muttering expletives like a loon A fantastic night had by all, thanks for checking out my Pics !
  25. Babies Castle, Hawkhurst, We decided to get out n about on a bit of a mini road trip, Chose this as the destination, took a while to get there and wanted to visit another well known site within the area for those of you that probably know it but unfortunately Its since been sold and the builders were in, This is the only fruit of our day !, So on with a bit of history Construction began on a new two-storey red brick building in the spring of 1886, and on 9th August it was formerly opened by Her Royal Highness, The Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, accompanied by her daughter princess Victoria who was later to become Queen Mary, the wife of King George V. In May 1959 a local Townswomen's Guild expressed 'considerable surprise' at the large number of 'coloured infants' at the Babies Castle. They warned that unless they could be assured that no white child was being refused admission as a consequence their support of Dr. Barnardo's would cease but they were reassured and the matter blew over. Clearly they had never bothered to read Thomas Barnardo's aims, known as "The Nine Nos"... 1. No destitute child refused 2. No Race Barrier 3. No Creed Clause 4. No Physical Disability 5. No Age Limit 6. No Money Promise 7. No Voting 8. No Waiting 9. No Red Tape (A lot of this Bullshit in modern day UK) Will in the famous kitchen And some of the Sumptuous Rooms, The Height of luxury in their day ! Quick, Our Way Out ! If you love Pealing Paint & Natural Decay, Then this is definitely the place for you ! All in all a fun day out with truly great company ! Thanks for viewing my Pics
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