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Found 110 results

  1. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  2. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/21w7SoA][/url]7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  3. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  4. History Lombard Street is reputed to be one of London’s streets that is steeped in seven hundred years of banking history. It began life in the Roman times of Londinium as a wealthy city road. It later became a notable banking street on account of several Jewish goldsmith occupants sometime during the Norman conquest. However, the street did not acquire its name until Italian goldsmiths, the Longobards from Lombardy, were granted the land during the reign of Edward I. The badge of the Medici family, the three golden pills, was first displayed here, and since then it has remained as a traditional sign of the pawnbroker. It is reported that most of the large present day UK banks share history with Lombard Street. For instance, Lloyd’s of London, an insurance market now located in London’s primary financial district, began as Lloyds coffee House in 1691. From around this time, most banks established their headquarters on Lombard Street. Many remained there right up until the 1980s; the decade that signalled the end of ‘runners’ donning top hats to deliver bills of exchange to the Bank of England. Number 60., which is the rooftop this report is based on, was occupied by T.S.B for many years and it was the last bank to move its headquarters out of the street. T.S.B have assured people that their legacy will continue to be an important part of the street and that their colourful sign hanging from the front façade will be a tribute to this. On the topic of signage, Lombard Street is said to be famous for being one of the few places in London where 17th and 18th century-styled shop signs still survive, jutting from buildings on wrought-iron brackets. However, it is said that some lateral thinking is required to decipher what the old signs signify: Adam and Eve meant fruiterer; a bugle’s horn, a post office; a unicorn, an apothecary’s; a spotted cat, a perfumer’s. Many of those that remain today were the emblems of rich families and Edwardian reconstructions of early goldsmiths’ signs. It is well-known that many early 20th century banks, such as Barclays with their eagle and Lloyds with their horse, re-appropriated some of these signs as company logos. It is important to note, though, that they all chose to adopt lifeless signs as their logos, as opposed to ‘breathing signs’ (cats in baskets, rats and parrots in cages, vultures tethered to wine shacks etc.), which were very fashionable at one time. Finally, another interesting fact about Lombard Street, but one that is completely unrelated to banking, is that it is where the first love of Charles Dickens lived. The girl’s name was Maria Beadnell, and she was the daughter of a bank manager. It is said that Dickens would often walk down Lombard Street in the early hours of the morning to gaze upon the place where she slept. By today’s standard that certainly would not be considered a romantic gesture – Dickens may well have landed himself in a spot of bother if he tried peeping through girl’s windows in this day and age. Our Version of Events Despite havinghigh aspirations for the night,all of them failed. So, we were heading back to the car to call it a night when we noticed some scaffolding thatlooked ‘a bit bait’ as the locals might put it. It involved a bit of a climbing and there was no way of avoiding any onlookers from seeing us. But, since we were very desperate for a rooftop at this point, we decided to have a crack at it anyway. In the end, and contrary to all appearances, getting onto the roof of 60 Lombard Street was easy, and it wasn’t long before we were ascending the last bit of scaff to get up to the highest point on the roof. One by one we gathered in a small sheltered space, waiting for everyone to catch up before we climbed the last ladder that took us up to the highest point. But, it was at that moment we noticed that there were suddenly a lot more people around than what we’d first started out with. As it turned out, another couple of lads had decided to have a crack at the bank rooftop too. It seemed that they were just as surprised to discover us lurking about up there. At first we had thought it might some over-zealous security guards on the verge of losing their jobs if they didn’t catch us, but thankfully we were wrong. Fortunately, there was enough space up top for all of us to congregate. Since it was pretty chilly, though, we wasted no time setting up the cameras to grab a few shots. As always, the views of London were spectacular. Sadly, however, all the buildings we had wanted to get on top of were the ones surrounding us, taunting us from every direction – and they looked even more enticing from where we were standing. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and Stewie. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7:
  5. History The Stratford Riverside (an apartment block) is a ‘prestigious’ new riverside development situated on the Waterworks River, near the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Once fully completed the project will be 29 storeys high and it will have a ‘striking’ glass façade. The building, which features balconies/terraces in every one of its 201 apartments, will offer residents fantastic views of London’s skyline, where it is possible to view the financial powerhouses of the British economy to the west, and the modern towers of Canary Warf to the south. Alternatively, people can also use the expansive roof garden on the 7th floor to gaze out at the city. Additional features of the development include a resident’s only gymnasium, a hotel-styled foyer with concierge and a café/bar. The developers describe the building as a ‘world of luxury’, suggesting that it will quickly become an enviable address in one of London’s fastest growing areas. Stratford itself is said to be a vibrant district of London, which offers everything you need for a ‘superior lifestyle’. For anyone who is interested, prices for a two-bedroom apartment start from £465,000, while three bedroom dwellings start from £680,000. Our Version of Events Looking for another night of fun in London, we decided to have a wander around Stratford.We’d noticed some development going on over that way a few evenings earlier, so thought it was worth a look around. After spending a few moments eying up various sites, we finally settled on the Stratford Riverside development; it looked reasonably high, and offered views over the Olympic Stadium. As always, it took a little time to figure out how to get onsite. Eventually, though, we found a suitable way into the site and ended up inside some sort of bush. As it turned out, this wasn’t the best way inside and Mayhem quickly discovered that the bush wasn’t weight bearing. There was a brief moment it seemed to take his weight, but a second later several large cracks erupted from beneath him and he was sent tumbled downwards. His life flashed before his eyes as he plummeted towards the ground below, and, as he told us later, he could see the bush above him steadily disappear as it grew smaller and smaller, as the distance between it and himself grew larger. Mayhem landed with a sudden thud, into an enormous pit of thorns. Feeling for his arms, legs and other essential parts, to check everything was where it was supposed to be, he glanced around to see where he was. As he began to come to his senses, he quickly realised that the fall had been a whopping metre. He could see a large hole in the bush above with moonlight pouring through. He was lucky to be alive. Using the light to find a way out, he attempted to crawl out of the pit where there were fewer thorns. A sudden pain shot through his body as he tried to move. Quickly he reached for his arse and it was then that he found a large spikey thorn wedged between his crack. Taking in several deep breathes, he grasped it firmly between both hands it gave it a good yank. A stifled scream escaped his tensed lips as the barbs very nearly extended the diameter of his anus. After breathing a sigh of relief, he managed to crawl his way out of the bush to join the rest of us who were waiting patiently. Next, we raced over to the buildings just ahead of us. At least most of us raced there; those less fortunate were forced to adopt a cowboy strut with their legs wide enough apart to prevent chafing. A few moments later and we were all gathered as the base of the building. From here we had to do a fair bit of ducking, a little bit of dodging and some diving to get to the top of the Riverside development. Had we been wearing leopard-skin leotards and headbands, we would have looked an 80s aerobics class in full swing. At the top of the Riverside development we immediately set about taking photographs. The view was pretty good, and once again we could see for miles. Unfortunately, it was blowing an absolute gale up on the rooftop, meaning it was hard to keep the tripods steady. It was brass monkeys up there too, so we didn’t stick around for too long. After facing the blizzards and hurricane force winds that were battering us harder than a granny with a washing bat, it wasn’t long before we were forced to retreat. In the end, we’ve managed to salvage some of the shots, but we were a little disappointed with them overall. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and two anonymous individuals. Stratford Riverside 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13:
  6. History “This is a historic day for Greenwich Peninsula and without doubt, this is one of the most exciting developments in London – of great significance to the capital as a whole, as well as to our borough. This scheme will bring the long-term regeneration of Greenwich Peninsula to fruition, cementing what is a whole new district for London providing housing and jobs for tens of thousands of people and landmark new facilities and buildings” (Councillor Denise Hyland). Greenwich Peninsula, which is surrounded on three sides by the river Thames, is in the east area of London. One of London’s famous landmarks, formerly known as ‘The Millennium Dome’, can be found on the tip of the peninsula. The area was first drained in the 16th century, so that the land could be cultivated. During this era, individuals accused of piracy were frequently hung in cages at Blackwell Point, precisely where the Dome is situated, to deter any other would-be pirates. As London grew, the peninsula quickly became increasingly industrialised, and by the 19th century there were many sites producing chemicals, steel, iron, cement, animal feed, asbestos, bronze and heavy guns. A large power station and gasworks took up the largest proportion of the peninsula, and at one point the gasworks was known as the largest producer of its kind in Europe. However, unfortunately the good times did not last, and the peninsula was hit by the widespread deindustrialisation of England in the late 1900s; many companies fell into financial crisis, and others moved overseas where production costs were cheaper. No longer producers, England was rapidly coming a consumer-based society. At the turn of the 21st century, most of the remaining industry was concentrated on the western side of the peninsula. As for the rest of the land, a large proportion of it was purchased by the Homes and Communities Agency (previously known as the National Regeneration Agency). The agency invested approximately £225 million into the area, helping to create homes, commercial spaces and new transport links. The construction of the Millennium Dome came next, alongside the Greenwich Millennium Village, which brought further residential development to the area: more homes, a school, a medical centre and a Holiday Inn. Currently, Greenwich Peninsula is undergoing more development as 15,000 new homes, two schools, a new transport hub (including London’s first cruise terminal), a 60,000 square metre business space and a 40,000 square metre film studio are being constructed. The Royal Borough of Greenwich Planning Board approved the planning application in 2015. It is estimated that 4,000 of the new homes will be affordable, and that the development will bring at least 12,000 new jobs to the area. Despite the optimism, there has been much criticism concerning long periods of inactivity, where little seems to be achieved. There are also disputes among developers and councillors over turning London into a high-rise capital, similar to Hong Kong or Manhattan. Many argue that London is not suited to being carpeted over with such towers, especially when families will have very little chance of ever living in them. Having said that, it is obvious that some development is underway and the area is gradually being transformed. Our Version of Events We were sat inside McDonalds and it was getting late. Despite the fact that we were in the heart of the capital which is celebrated for its fine quality food, diversity and choice, we ended up choosing this fine establishment to fuel up before we went out exploring. As you might expect, it smelt strongly of grease, tomato sauce and cheap cleaning product; the floors were so caked in all those substances customers could slide their way right up to the counter; it was a bit like curling without the stones. For a while we each stared hard at our burgers, searching for some evidence of something natural as we munched on what were effectively bags of salt with a few crispy fries hidden inside. Suddenly, my eyes caught a glimpse of something. A long scraggly hair poking out from under the gherkin. I pulled at it, hoping to tug it out in one swift yank, but it kept coming. It grew longer and longer with every tug. Yummy! After an intense struggle, the beasty hair, coated in goo and white bits (which I was hoping was mayonnaise), was eventually successfully removed. Cleared of all debris (hair, fingernails and all that sort of shit), I began to prepare myself for the taste sensation that was about to ensue. Death in a bun, with a bit of brown lettuce squeezed in-between for aesthetics. Precisely fourteen minutes and eight seconds later, we left McDonalds relatively unscathed. Now, fully fuelled on absolute shit, we thought it would be a good idea to check out a massive development on the peninsula that we’d spotted earlier in the day. It didn’t take long to make our way over there, and once we arrived we decided to have a little wander around the premises first of all, to check out the camera situation. Initially, it didn’t look good. There were cameras of all shapes and sizes dotted around (big ones, tall ones, small ones and rotating ones), hundreds of the fuckers, along with PIRs and several high-powered lights. At the time we were thinking that we’d never seen so many security devices in one location before, but, in hindsight, we always end up thinking this… What made things worse was the heavy traffic. Anyone would think the city never sleeps. After deciding where we would enter, we waited. We waited some more. Then, we did a little bit more waiting, just for the crack. And, POOF! After smashing a bottle of instant fog against the ground, all of a sudden we magically appeared inside the construction site. I’d like to say that we popped along to the Leaky Cauldron earlier in the day, and that we’d managed to lay our hands on some of that magic dust they all rave about, but it turns out it doesn’t really exist. We had to make do with bottled fog from the North York Moors. It was a right bastard to collect with empty Sprite bottles and fishing nets from Aldi, but we managed it. Inside, we raced to the nearest crane. It was very difficult to access, so we whipped out a grappling hook and harpoon launcher. This made things a lot easier. Like ninjas in the night we ascended the rope and managed to get onto the crane itself. Once inside the main tower where the ladder is located we began to climb, right up to the hatch. Disappointingly, it was locked, so we decided we’d try another one and started to descend. At the bottom of the crane though, we discovered that there was access to a basement, so we popped inside in search of water. By now the McDonalds had vaporised all the water content in our bodies, so we were parched. Thankfully, we found some, and what a refreshing experience it was! At that moment I would have been willing to drink the Thames, I was so thirsty. After drinking our body-wright in water, we continued on to the next crane. We raced to the next crane, and the many litres of water we’d consumed sloshed about inside us noisily. At least it felt that way. At the base of the next crane, Mayhem volunteered to go first. Having used up the grapple hook, he was forced to use suction cups this time round. His ascent was painstakingly slow, but eventually he made it to the hatch. Unfortunately, this one too was locked. Feeling even more disappointed and disheartened, we decided to take the stairs to the top of the nearby building instead (which was about fifteen storeys high). We figured the night wouldn’t be an entire waste if we got some shots from up there. It was only when we reached the top of the building that we noticed yet another third crane. Deciding that we’d try our luck one last time, we decided to scramble up and see if access was possible. Fortunately, this hatch was unlocked! Moments later we emerged on the top of the crane, surrounded by fantastic views of the peninsula. Several other cranes were visible from our position, and they too looked quite spectacular from where we were stood, with their range of lights and colours. Wasting no time, we whipped out the camera gear and started taking photographs. After that, we did the usual thing of hanging around for a wee bit, taking the time to take in the view with our own eyes. In the end, we felt satisfied with how the night turned out. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and two other anonymous individuals. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11:
  7. History The Grade II Crystal Palace subway is a former Victorian relic that lies beneath the A212. The arched subway, which led from the High Level line and station into the centre transept of The Crystal Palace, opened two days before Christmas day, in 1865. Constructed out of plate-glass and cast-iron, The Crystal Palace was originally situated in Hyde Park to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. The building was rebuilt in a larger and more elaborate form on Penge Common, near Sydenham Hill – an affluent area of London at the time. At the time the development, which comprised of 4,000 tons of iron, cost £150,000 (approximately £2 million today); this was an incredible amount of money in the 1800s. A second building, known as The Garden Palace which was based on the same design, was also constructed in Sydney in 1879. By the 1890s the popularity of the Palace had deteriorated considerably; it was purported that the condition of the building gave it the ‘appearance of a downtown market’. Bankruptcy was declared in 1911 and possession of the building passed through the hands of the Earl of Plymouth, until the 1920s when a public subscription purchased the Palace on behalf of the nation. Under the guidance of Sir Henry Buckland, Crystal Palace was restored to its former glory and it began to attract visitors once again. Nevertheless, despite the effort that went into the refurbishment, on the 30th November 1936 a catastrophic fire destroyed the entire building. It was reported that the fire started following an explosion in the woman’s cloakroom. Although over 400 firefighters arrived on the scene, they were unable to extinguish the ravaging fire. A few hours after it started, the entire building burnt down; all that was left standing were two water towers. These were later demolished. Somewhat ironically, The Garden Palace in Sydney was also destroyed by fire in September 1882; the only remnants of it that remain today are the sandstone gateposts and wrought iron gates. With Crystal Palace’s destruction, traffic on the High Level line quickly declined. However, the line was used during World War II as people used the former subway as an air raid shelter. The subway was fitted with 190 bunkbeds and chemical toilets. After the way, the High Level line was repaired following bomb damage, but the continuing decline in the number of passengers using led to its permanent closure in 1954. The station was demolished in 1961, and the old Palace site was redeveloped into housing in the 1970s. The subway, which manage to survive both the fire and demolition, still remains today. During the 1960s the old subway was popular among children as the old wooden steps were still in situ, meaning it quickly became a playground. By the late 1970s the subway was home to ‘Subway Superdays’, a society that organised cultural and educational days. The subway was finally closed to the public, except the occasional open day, in the 1990s, due to health and safety concerns. Presently, the Friends of Crystal Palace Subway aim to reopen the Grade II listed small underground space, for community use. Most recently, the FCPS received planning permission from the Council to reinstate a gate on the Southwark side of the Parade. Our Version of Events After spending the night in London, we set off bright and early with good intentions for the day ahead. The old Crystal Palace subway was at the top of our list, because it looked pretty unique and there are rumours it will be reopened to the public very soon. For some reason, there seems to be less enjoyment in being able to see something that’s publically accessible, so we wanted to get it under our belts before we lost the opportunity to see it in all its abandoned glory. When we first arrived, access looked to be a bit problematic. It’s surrounded by palisade fencing, but that isn’t the main problem; after that there’s a rather large drop into the subway and we couldn’t see any obvious way of getting down there. You would think we’d have anticipated that, given it is a subway after all, but we didn’t. For a brief moment we discussed amongst ourselves how prepared we’d been, because we’d had the foresight to bring along a rope with us on this trip; however, we also made note that the rope was back in the car, on the other side of London. At first, we were going to have a crack at climbing down into the old courtyard but, because there was a park keeper nearby who probably would have seen us, we re-reconsidered this idea. Ten minutes later, after some quick thinking and waiting for the crowd next to a nearby bus stop to clear a little, we found ourselves stood outside the main gates of the subway. It looked spectacular inside, much better than all the photographs we’ve seen of the place; ours don’t do it much justice either mind, it’s one of those places you have to actually visit to experience it fully. Stood outside the locked gates still didn’t get us in, though, and the gap in the gates was tight. For those of us who don’t seem to eat, it was piss easy; for the rest of us, we had to strip down a bit and crack out a few hundred push up to shed a few inches off the waistline. Breathing in deeply was crucial… And not breathing out again midway through the bars was even more important! But, as anyone who’s ever squeezed through a tight hole will know, once the shoulders are through the rest is plain sailing. Gasping for air, we dropped into the old subway, and took in our surroundings. Inside, with the uniquely shaped pillars, patterned stone floor and red and cream brickwork, the atmosphere is phenomenal – if it wasn’t for the A212 above, it would feel like you’ve stepped into a different world. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. The Crystal Palace Crystal Palace High Level Train Station 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  8. History Highgate Station was constructed in 1867, by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway, in a deep cutting that was excavated from Highgate Hill. The two tunnels penetrating the hillside from either side of the station were built some years before the station itself. Highgate Station was designed so that it had two side platforms and three tracks between them. A station building was constructed to the south end of the platform, along with a covered footbridge which connected the two platforms. The entire station was rebuilt in the 1880s, and a new central platform with two tracks flanking either side was constructed. The island could be accessed via a ticket office located in the middle of the footbridge. The station was altered again in 1935, as part of the ‘Northern Heights’ project that sought to incorporate the Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace lines into the London Transport Network. The first stage of the project involved the construction of tube tunnels underneath Highgate Station. To provide an interchange between the new deep-level platforms and the existing surface platforms, a subterranean pedestrian network was built immediately beneath Highgate Station. Stairs and escalators were installed to connect the existing platforms with the new underground ones, and street entrances to the concourse were built on Archway Road and Priory Gardens. As the pedestrian footbridge was no longer required, it was demolished along with some parts of the original buildings. The remaining sections of the older buildings were redeveloped, together with the surface platforms themselves which received some minor alterations. Following World War Two, plans to improve Highgate Station were never fully completed. As other sections of London’s Railways required urgent maintenance, and were deemed more important as they were more central to the heart of the city, Highgate became less of a priority. Despite being labelled as ‘under construction’ for years on various maps, by the early 1950s passenger services at Highgate’s surface Station ceased, but freight traffic continued to pass through the station until 1964. After freight traffic ceased to operate on this section of the line, it was used only for occasional London Underground rolling stock transfers between Highgate Depot and the Northern City line; however, since it was never electrified the stock had to be pulled over the lines using battery-powered locomotives. All activity ceased on Highgate’s surface lines by 1970, due to the poor structural integrity of some of the nearby bridges. Presently, one of the original 1867 buildings still stands; this is rumoured to be used as a residential building. As for the station itself, a number of the older buildings were demolished, leaving only the 1940s structures standing. Plastic sheeting was used to cover the old track bed after the rails were removed, to prevent water from seeping into the northern lines concourse which lies below. Much of the old route between Finsbury Park and Alexandra Palace is now part of the Parkland Walk; however, this bypasses the station for health and safety reasons. Our Version of Events Getting into London by car wasn’t quite as bad as we’d imagined, but finding a spot to park was an absolute nightmare. As we toured the city for a bit, looking for somewhere to stop the car, we noticed that people seem to squeeze into any spot available; there were mere centimetres between some of them! Finally, after much searching, we found a space (thankfully) that wasn’t too far from Highgate Station. Judging by some of the cars that were parked near us, and the moss growing on their rooves, a few of them seem to have been there for a long time. Having witnessed this, we think we now understand, a bit more clearly, why there’s such a parking problem in London. Since we’d heard the station was situated in a hillside and surrounded by trees, we imagined finding it would be a bit of a challenge. As it turned out, however, we were wrong – it’s very visible. Gaining access wasn’t difficult either, which we were also surprised about given that there’s a busy station next door; we had gauged that it might be difficult to slip onto the old premises without being seen with such a high volume of people around. Once again we were mistaken in our assumption, as no one seemed to give a shit that we looked slightly suspicious milling around an abandoned site with tripods and cameras, meaning we were able to wander into the station very easily. Once onsite, even though people could probably see us quite clearly from the live station and a public footpath which runs alongside the platform, no one glanced our way; instead, everyone seemed more intent on rushing to wherever it was they were going. After a quick wander around the site it was obvious that there isn’t much there, and all of the tunnel portals are sealed, together with the additional doorway we found down the staircase on the main platform. The station itself was less impressive than it looked from old pictures we’d found of it, but it felt very odd, in a good way, being in part of the City of London that certainly didn’t feel like a city at all. Inside the small gully it was peaceful and we encountered trees and foxes – three things we never thought we’d find in the capital. The next fifteen minutes were spent taking in the quiet atmosphere and a few photographs, before we decided to head off to the next explore we had lined up. Overall, then, the site is perfect is you’re passing through the area, especially if you fancy a break from the hustle and bustle, but it’s probably not worth travelling from further afield to visit it. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. Looking west at Highgate Station in 1868, when it first opened. Highgate Station in the 1880s, looking west, when the two side platforms were replaced. The station in the early 1940s. The old 1800s toilet block was retained and incorporated into the overall design at this point. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  9. History Up on the bleak moorland, just outside the small spa town of Buxton, is Harpur Hill and its large 222 ha Health and Safety Testing Facility. Funded under the Government’s Private Finance Initiative, the £56 million laboratory was constructed back in 2002. Years ago, back in 1938, Harpur Hill was a remote RAF base that housed bunkers and an underground ammunition store; therefore, the land was found to be suitable, and still rural enough, for redevelopment into a testing facility. Presently, part of the site has been used to reconstruct a Jubilee Line, using old London Underground trains. It aims to recreate the 7/7 London Tube bombings so the safety of future carriages might be improved. The facility warns that whenever red flags are flying at designated posts around perimeter, a toxic explosion on the site is imminent. Other experiments at the site have involved crash testing trains, heating up shipping containers packed with fireworks and replicating other notable accidents. According to local rumours, although public footpaths run through the grounds of the facility, the site is closely monitored by sensors, and watched by CCTV cameras, and they observe your every move! A team of camouflaged ‘Area 51’ style guards also hide in the bushes and patrol the perimeter on half-hourly rotations. The locals say so, so it must be true. What is more, aside from normal workers, it is believed that a team of scientists live onsite; apparently, they have been sighted exercising on the grounds, but they are never allowed to leave. Finally, the old tunnels are said to still be in service, but whatever goes on down there remains a tight secret. Our Version of Events Anyone who has read our previous reports will know that for a while we rolled around in a bright orange car – not by choice we hasten to add. For this explore, though, we decided to ditch the old beast, and go for something more covert, given that this site sounded like Fort Knox. Our choice would have been a tank, to bypass the ‘Area 51’ style guards, but nowhere we know had any of those available. Instead, we had to settle for a blue car; we could only hope it would blend in with the surrounding countryside. Doing our best to look like ‘hikers’, with Peter Storm boots, plastic anoraks and a bit of tweed, we abandoned the new motor in a layby and joined the footpath that leads towards the facility. To avoid the ‘commandos’ in the bushes, we pretended to look like lost walkers, gazing hard into the sky as though we were trying to find the North Star; we hear that’s how ‘propa’ hikers navigate. Eventually, after leaving several false trails in our effort to shake the guards, we reached the perimeter fence. However, by now it was lunchtime, and being hikers we’d brought our sandwiches and Ginsters pasties with us, so it was crucial we sat down to eat them. The lukewarm flask of tea went down nicely at this point too, it’s thirsty work trying to be stealthly. After making some final adjustments to our thick woollen walking socks, we decided to orientate the map and check our bearings. A couple of pasty crumbs deceived us at first, as we thought they were buildings, but because one of us has gained our Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award we were eventually able to spot the mistake. So, guessing we were right on the right course, we set off once again. Judging by the brown wiggly lines on the map, it looked as though the motion sensors were dead ahead. Of course, being prepared for every eventuality, we’d brought air-freshener with us to combat this obstacle. A great plume of Air Wick’s 4 in 1 Lavender scent was released in front of us as we walked; we hear that ‘pro urbexers’ do this to make motion sensor laser beams appear. Don’t worry, for those of you who are wondering, we did a couple of stretches right after we got the air freshener out, to make us supple enough for a game of Twister, and to squeeze between the beams if necessary. Several moments later, despite our tactics, security must have spotted us because a pack of scientifically altered dogs from the laboratory were on our tail. Ignoring the legendary advice that you shouldn’t run on a full stomach, we hit legs. The great steroid injected beasts were right behind us now, foaming at the mouths and growling loudly. Being prepared ‘urbexers’ though, we reached into our High Gear rucksacks and pulled out three fresh steaks – Tesco’s Finest, from some made up farm somewhere. Ford Mayhem lobbed them behind us as hard as he could manage. The trick seemed to work, as the dogs quickly stopped and devoured each other in the frenzy. The four of us, breathless after running, reached the final perimeter; it was a large 32.7 foot palisade fence with razor wire fixed on top. As we grumbled amongst ourselves, that the ‘locals’ had failed to tell us about the fence, we decided to take a break and come up with a plan. Feeling hungry once again, and knowing we had to keep our energy up, we pulled out a gas stove and a couple of Wayfayrer flat-packs (sausage and beans). An awkward silence ensued as we tucked into our meal; knowing that you might lose a testicle climbing a fence puts a bit of a downer on things… … And then we stopped daydreaming about the local rumours. In reality, there were no guards, motion sensors or any air freshener. The modified dogs weren’t real either, they were sheep, and, as far as we could tell, they weren’t modified in any way at all. Other than passing through a couple of muddy fields, reaching the underground trains was actually fairly straightforward and largely uneventful. It did feel a little odd being sat on a London Tube train with Peak District scenery in the background of course. Overall though, it was great to see and experience the site as it was interesting to see London Underground trains ‘out of context’ so to speak, and because some great work is being done here – we only wish we’d been present when they put fireworks inside a shipping container. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. *No tweed was worn for the duration of this explore. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  10. History: Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England, built in the 18th century, with later additions. It has fine views down over the Thames, and both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786, and built St Elizabeth of Portugal Church in The Vineyard, Richmond. It was the residence of the Cook baronets from when it was bought in 1849 by the first baronet until after World War II. A 125-foot-long-gallery (38 m) was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. The house was damaged by bombing in the Second World War and the 4th baronet moved to Jersey with 30 paintings from the collection. In 2012 the house was on the market with an asking price of £15,000,000. Future: C18 house with C19 alterations made by the Cook family. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent have been granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery to ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. The explore: So we spent basically all day in traffic jams to get there and back... The explore itself was surprisingly easy too; I must admit, that from what I have seen of it, I was expecting the place to be a little bigger than it was, but I guess thats the art of the wide angle lens! Anyway, great explore, would definitely revisit providing there are no traffic issues!
  11. Managed to bag some tickets for London's disused station, Aldwych. Not been south for a while, so got a nice early train down and had a good walk round for the day. Construction started on 21 October 1905 with demolition of the Royal Strand Theatre which occupied the site, it opened as Strand station on 30 November 1907. Both entrances had Piccadilly tube on their facades when the station opened. Not long afterwards, these were changed to Piccadilly RLY as the UERL disliked the word tube. The station was renamed Aldwych on 9 May 1915. The Aldwych service was suspended on 22 September 1940 and used as a shelter for the public during air raids. It opened again on 1st July 1946. The platforms and tunnels at Aldwych station are 92 feet and 6 inches below street level. From June 1958 the line began only in rush hours. It was eventually closed in 1994 when the original 1907 lifts needed urgent replacement and the cost could not be justified. Aldwych station and the trains have been used for many films, TV productions, music videos ( some listed below) and emergency services training. (Film) Superman 4 Atonement V for Vendetta The edge of love 28 weeks later The deep blue sea The Krays (Tv) Sherlock Mr selffridge (music) The Prodigys, firestarter A modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III. The station was the subject of an episode of most haunted in 2002. Im not a fan of of the show, but it starts with history into the station, which is pretty good. On with the pictures, Thanks for looking my friends
  12. Went with SK, Miss_anthrope and one non member Everyone knows the history but a quick copy and paste from Battersea.org The proposal to site a large power station on the south bank of the River Thames at Battersea in 1927 caused a storm of protest that raged for years. Questions were raised in Parliament about pollution which might harm the paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery and the parks and "noble buildings of London". Now Battersea Power Station is one of the best loved landmarks after serving London with electricity for 50 years. In the UK during the 1920s electricity was supplied by numerous private companies who built small power stations for individual industries with some of the surplus power generated going to the public supply. There was a bewildering variety of incompatible systems, high cost and jealous competition between the numerous companies. This chaotic situation caused Parliament to decree that electricity generation should be a single unified system under public ownership.It was to be another 30 years before the electricity supply was nationalised. In the interim the formation of the London Power Company was a response by private owners to delay the imposition of public ownership. Set up in 1925 it took up Parliaments recommendation that electricity generation should be in fewer, larger power stations. This led directly to the building of the first super station, to produce 400,000 kilowatts, in Battersea. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott was commissioned to design the building. His other buildings include Liverpool Cathedral, Bankside Power Station, Waterloo Bridge and the classic red telephone box. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Just a mess around photo to see what it looks like and if people like it!!!!!! 10. 11. 12. thanks for looking guys hope you enjoy it
  13. Hi everybody, I'm a kiwi who has just arrived in London (via China, Mongolia, Central Asia etc) and just wanted to say hi! Have followed the posts on the facebook page but wanted to reach out to any fellow explorers in the London area who may be keen to get together and share stories, drinks or adventures! I am a reasonably amateur urbexer, my favourites sites I have visited have been Barenquell in Berlin, a colonial era police station in Phnom Penh, and an old Pepsi factory in Battambang, Cambodia (now demolished ). Not sure what is about in this huge metropolitan (other than Battersea) but I am keen to find out! Thanks and see you around!
  14. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  15. The Official sales chat - taken from the website Offering breathtaking views, first class facilities and superlative living accommodation in a location of international status, Lincoln Plaza is set to provide one of the most prestigious and sophisticated new landmarks on Canary Wharf’s iconic skyline. Soaring up to the 31st floor, Lincoln Plaza comprises two principal apartment towers - Franklin and Greenwich - together with a 12-storey international brand name 100-suite hotel which integrates with the two towers, allowing residents access to a fabulous array of lifestyle facilities. Adjacent is a 10 level ‘rotunda’ apartment building complimenting this striking new landmark against Canary Wharf’s dazzling architecture. Each apartment has been meticulously designed to create the perfect equilibrium of luxury quality and style, featuring comfort cooling, individually selected stone tiled flooring, SMEG kitchen appliances and Hansgrohe bathroom refinements. With all the exclusive facilities of a world class hotel, Lincoln Plaza is also set to deliver a comprehensive health club complete with spa, pool and fully equipped gymnasium, opulent entrance foyer with 24-hour concierge, business lounge, private cinema and four storey winter garden ‘sky lounge’ on the 22nd floor. The explore I got into the docklands area in the late evening looking to do a couple of roof top explores. After parking up at my usual car dumping spot (thanks Asda), I made my way across to the first location, which the last time I checked was completely abandoned & an easy one to say the least. Things had changed somewhat, with the site being live & from the looks of things, pretty active. The vantage point from there is somewhat mediocre from what I saw from other people’s past visits, so I decided to forget about it & moved on to the next place. The second location was pretty well guarded with cameras pointing at the most obvious entry points. The area was still pretty busy by this point, so I circled around the perimeter & took a walk over to my third potential location, Lincoln plaza. I had given this a look when I was in the area a few weeks back, & it looked pretty secure, & with lots of nosey bods about I decided against it. This time the situation was quite different! It was still quite lively, so I decided to take myself over to the dockside to take a few leisurely night shots, & more importantly kill some time. After a while I decided that I had frozen my arse off enough & decided to make a go for it. I waited until there was nobody around, then took my moment & snuck in, pausing momentarily behind the portaloo while a car zipped past. After a bit of fast pacing into the building I was at the core staircase. It soon became apparent why it was so easy to get in, because on every floor there was a shiny dome camera watching. They must have thought no one is dumb enough to proceed with all of this surveillance here, right? Wrong! I proceeded to make my way up, & getting tired of ducking my head down each time I passed one of these things I got cheeky & gave one a very sarcastic wave. I noticed soon after that there was a sound other than me moving. I stopped & listened through the central gap in the stairs, & sure enough, there was the sound of someone high tailing up the stairs after me…….obviously they didn’t take kindly to my brazened attitude! I picked up the pace & made it to the top floor, I stepped through the doorway & immediately paused. I heard the sound of either someone’s phone or radio playing music. I made a slow retreat back down to the floor below, & hid in a dark corner. I stayed there for an hour, waiting & listening to someone systematically opening the doors to each floor in search of me. I thought it was only a matter of time before I got caught, & I started to get a bit concerned as I was doing it lone wolf. But to my surprise, after a while whoever was on the lookout had buggered off & I was left to explore again. After checking the top floor once more, I concluded that whoever was camped up there wasn’t going to be moving any time soon. I admitted defeat & decided to call it a night. I felt a bit deflated, as my goal was to get to the roof & take some vista shots, which I obviously couldn’t do. So I began checking floors at random to see if there were any other vantage points to be had. I eventually came to a floor that had a door leading to a roof terrace, I immediately did a mini fist pump & thought “it’s back on!†I raced up the opposing tower core until I reached a skylight, & within about a minute I was on the roof. The views were pretty awesome, as are most high rises in London. One thing that became immediately apparent was the wind. I was totally exposed up there, & while trying my best to take long exposures I was getting absolutely battered. As a result the shots I got weren’t the best, but I think we’ve all been in that situation before! After soaking up the scenery for a good while, I decided that it was time to make a hasty retreat. I retraced my steps back to my original accent & made my way back down. To my shock there was no one around to greet me at the bottom, which was a big relief. When I stepped back into the public realm I was met by a passing couple on their way home. They looked pretty puzzled as I passed them, obviously from an outsider perspective it’s a bit weird for someone to be coming out of a building site on their own in the early hours of the morning! Let me know what you think of the shots, I’m pretty new to night photography so any CC would be appreciated. Note; the internal ones are just taken from my phone, as I wasn't really bothered about the inside tbh. Pinkman
  16. Various bits of cobbled together footage from exploring metro systems in London and overseas. (The end bit at Aldwych is an in-joke). https://vimeo.com/31108510 There's stuff from New York and skyscrapers and stuff on the account, as well as a trip to North Korea. I rarely film, so not much on there.
  17. After a curry and some beers with mates I decided to go climb something on my way home, as you do. The first site was a fail so I headed for the nearest crane and ended up here. I've always wanted to get up above Leicester Square but the insane amount of police everywhere always put me off. Tonight I didn't give a shit and it was quite amusing looking down on the police totally oblivious to me above them. Raw 1 - Police - Nil.....on this occasion at least 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking kids
  18. Infiltration, Underground London.

    A few visits to various sections over the past few years and thought I may as well do something with the clips taken. It might not link as showing error in linking and to try latter
  19. Visited both these place after travelling down to London the night before the kent meetup I had always wanted to see London from the rooftops with my own eyes and it did not disappoint! much better than the rubbish views I had seen in Leeds and Sheffield! Thanks to The Raw and Extreme Ironing for showing us these 2 and thanks again to The Raw for letting us crash at his house! Cheers for looking
  20. Met up with extreme_ironing and maniac in Tooting about 8pm for some food with the intention of heading to East London to check out some cinemas. Four beers later and so much Lebanese food that we all had the meat sweats, we realised none of us could deal with going too far with so we decided to pop in here and see what's left. Although a fair bit of stuff has been stripped out and asbestos removal is in full flow we found a surprising amount of epic stuff still inside. Access is far easier than it was too which was a bonus, especially with broken ribs. We spent a couple of hours inside and there is a lot more left than shown in my photos, much better than I expected. History (shamelessly stolen from Bhg's report ): The Young’s Brewery has been a familiar local landmark for both Wandsworth residents and visitors for over 150 years. Opened in 1831, the site has contributed much to the borough’s social and historic fabric. In 1831, Charles Allen Young and his partner Anthony Fothergill Bainbridge bought the Ram Brewery site. The new partnership suffered a serious setback in 1832 when a disastrous fire destroyed most of the brewhouse, but it was quickly rebuilt and in 1835 a new beam engine was erected inside the brewery. It is thought to be the oldest working beam engine of its kind in the world still in working condition and in its original location. It and its sister engine built in 1867, provided steam power in the brewery right up until 1976. In 1883 another fire, started in the offices, caused extensive damage to part of the brewery and the Ram Inn. Both were rebuilt the following year.A number of animals were resident in the brewery, including a ram, a number of geese and about a dozen working draught horses. It is claimed that the Ram Brewery was the oldest British brewery in continuous operation. At its closure in 2006, the brewery was a mix of ancient and ultra-modern plant and horses and drays were still used for local deliveries of beer within a mile or two of the brewery. The Ram Brewery officially closed on 25th September 2006. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Brewery humour, this was quite appropriate actually 9. 10. 11. 12. These beam engines are the most historical machinery in here. One of them was built in 1835. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Stay classy Oblivion State
  21. UK Minories, London - Sept 15

    Visited with The_Raw, ExtremeIroning, Raz and Jamie_P Setting the scene; 5 people, 1 206, a huge squash. After exiting my clown car which was clearly not designed for more than 3 people (French so i guess i expect too much) we jumped the wall, shimmied the scaff, over a fence and we were in... or we thought we were... secca come running over while we make our hasty escape. Fast forward 3 hours and we are back, after doing another location ready for another crack. Mr secca had tried to be clever by securing the helus, but had failed to note the ladder like fence next to it... how proffessional. So over it we went and up the steps. Tiring but so worth it, I dont know which took my breath away the most, the stairs or the view. I could have stayed up there all night but alas eventually we had to leave in order to go to the Kent meet up. Heres what i got; Raz taking it all in... If you got this far, thanks for looking
  22. Massive thanks to The_Raw and ExtremeIroning for showing us this one!! Well worth the 4 hour drive from T'old Yorkshire to the big city! Explored with Raz, Jamie, Damo and Michael the night before the Kent Meet up. From what I can gather Angel Court is a 70's design high rise office block which has recently been pulled down to replace the old style concrete floors with the new alloy light weight stuff. Its situated in the middle of a construction site in the heart of the financial district (I think...) So After a 4 hour drive from Yorkshire straight from work we met Damo and Michael and first of all we tried a block of flats only to be confronted by a rather rude and aggressive resident. So down we made a quick exit and i spent the next 20 mins trying to navigate the chaos of London city centre roads for the first time. Found somewhere to park and then managed to get pretty lost and walk around 3 miles more than we should have done (Burned off my MacDonalds so thanks for that guys ) we arrived at Angel Court. At first i was convinced that 5 of us were not going to sneak into this site but alas we did, starting with Michael scaling the fence and making it a little easier for the rest. Far too many steps in here Only spent half hour or so at the top as we were pushed for time but heres what i got; Thanks for looking
  23. Hey guys and girls, I’ve been a reader of this great forum of yours for some time now and thought i was high time I signed up.I first came across your forum when reading the updates on the Save Earls Court campaign twitter of the raw's pictures of the site where I and many others had the pleasure of working until the New Year.-A terrible waste and an act of vandalism by Boris Johnson and the establishment... I would urge any of you who have an interest in the site, visited over the years, worked there or live in the area to sign the petition, hosted by 38 degrees calling for demolition to be immediately halted and an independent health review to be carried out: https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/petition-for-an-independent-health-review-of-the-earls-court-redevelopment Thanks in advance Anyway I look forward to looking at more of your work in many more interesting places and hopefully post some pics of my own adventures of derelict railway and maritime sites over the years. I have some pictures I took of Motherwell TMD (a railway depot on the south eastern outskirts of Glasgow) while I had the chance to wonder around place while it was abandoned, awaiting its future back in 2007 that I'll try to post up when I get a chance. Due to my work, I've been fortunate to gain access to many sites off limits to members of the public over the years and when I can I'll often go walkies with my camera and/or iPhone.. Well thanks for having us, look forward to getting started. Cheers, Weeman.
  24. I had my first look around some Victorian drains this week. Massive thanks to Adders for taking me, extreme_ironing, and a friend visiting from Germany to see these epic bits of infrastructure. I probably wouldn't have ventured down without his expertise and knowledge to be honest. I've also used his and Ojay's previous comprehensive reports as a reference for some factual information so cheers lads. Oh yeah, and thanks to everyone that came along for helping me light the place as my torch batteries were dead, I really need to learn from this as it's not the first time I've found myself underground trying to use my iPhone as a torch! Not Pro. These were the cleaner bits of the network, manageable in just wellies although 'clean' probably isn't the best description. Having said that I was expecting the smell to be far worse than it was but it didnt bother me one little bit whilst down there. We visited 3 separate sections in one evening and saw some epic bits, it's amazing that these old tunnels have survived so long, are still being used today and for the foreseeable future. An amazing feat in engineering and construction. Lucky Charms, officially known as Clapham storm relief, serves the Southern High Level No.1/Putney & Clapham extension & Balham Sewers. It was designed towards the end of the 19th century (approximately 1870s at a guess) by Joseph Bazalgette, the chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works. His major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames. An old worker's cart left behind since construction took place Epic Engineering South West Storm Relief, up to the River Effra. Part of the same network as Lucky Charms but further along There were some nasty pieces of shit in the River Effra, and I'm not just referring to Adders Our German friend with camera equipment way too expensive for places like this I told Roxanne she didn't have to put on the red light but she insisted River Fleet Outfall Chamber, which deals with flows from the storm relief and the Fleet Mainline when at capacity. The Fleet storm relief was built in 1875 in order to give extra capacity to the Fleet Sewer The Fleet Mainline, it was seriously hot and steamy in here for all the wrong reasons. This was the only pic that came out ok for that reason. Abandoned machinery left to rust Penstock mechanism for the chamber below that feeds into the Low Level 1 interceptor. These allow works to shutdown the flow to certain places using the giant flaps pictured below. Apparently if you fell down here you would end up at Abbey Mills pumping station (albeit dead and smelling of shit). The outfall chamber, this fills up with Thames sludge as the Fleet is tidal. A mix of sewage, mud, silt and whatever else, probably best not to know in fact. Luckily it was only ankle deep when we were inside but it can rise up as high as the gantry in front of these flaps when at high tide. These giant 4 flaps control the flow into the main outfall chamber, must've been a pretty amazing feat to get these lumps down here back in the day Two small flaps behind here control the flow from the Fleet Storm Relief rejoining the Combined Sewer Overflow These make the most amazing boom when you lift them and let them clang Thanks for looking
  25. This place is in a epic location and makes for some nice sightseeing, although waiting for a gap in traffic was another story... We didn't get as long as we wanted in here due to a couple of the group getting busted! just as I was about to climb the tower nevertheless we managed enough time to get around most of the place! Cheers for looking
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