Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Dubbed Navigator

      Style   11/21/2017

      Hello - we are pleased to announce that there is now a light version of the style. If you wish to use it, go to the bottom left of the site where there is an option to change it 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'mansion'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 38 results

  1. The Mcneil Mansion burlington city new jersey..Mcniel was a pipe maker he created his own enclosed town..he had his own electicty factory,his own firehouse,all next to his pipe factory as it once looked There was amovement to tear it down...i tried my ancient hebrew curse resh resh...to stop it..and so far its worked t parts of the mansion are dangerous..my foot sank a few times that a sign to move quick the main stair case..there are a few other stairways up each room has its own decay it had its own elevator he had huge walk in safes in the basement some parts of the mansion wre in good shape the mansion is ust one of the bjuildings on the site theres many more..some are in the video...a few ghost voices are caught including my name being called
  2. History ‘Legend has it that McLean, then aged nearly eighty, walked in to the offices of England Brothers Architects and told the clerk he wanted the plan of a house. He was offered the blueprint of a conventional four-roomed cottage popular at the time. McLean retorted abruptly – “Not four rooms, but FORTY!” He was then ushered into the office of R. W. England.’ (Christchurch City Council). McLean’s Mansion, formerly known as Holly Lea, is a Category 1 heritage building that was designed by Robert England. It was built for the seventy-eight-year-old Scottish philanthropist, Allan McLean, between April 1899 and September 1900 by Rennie and Pearce Builders. Once it was completed it became, at the time, the largest wooden residential structure in New Zealand, built almost entirely out of kauri (a type of evergreen tree). The mansion, which is said to have been inspired by Mentmore Towers in Buckinghamshire, is based on a fusion of styles of Jacobean architecture and additional Victorian features. Once completed, the building had fifty-three rooms in total. There were nineteen bedrooms, nine bathrooms, six servant rooms, a library, a kitchen, a large basement, a large dining area and additional function rooms. Analogous to other Jacobean buildings, many of the interior features were elaborate and ornamental; most the handiwork of Christian artisans. A number of the ceilings on the ground floor were extravagant coffered ceilings. Finally, the balustrades and newel posts on the grand staircase featured thistles and flowers, all emblems of Scotland, to remind visitors of the owner’s homeland. As for the furnishings, most were of an exclusive design specifically selected by the housekeeper and an expert from Paris. Both were sent to Britain with instructions to buy there, or from Europe, regardless of the cost. The following descriptions of different rooms in the house provide a good impression of what McLean Mansion’s interior looked like: … an enchanting wood carving of the traditional bear and her playful cub up a seven-foot tree. Along one wall a mirrored mahogany stand displays a fine group of bronze and marble statuary. Nearby is the handsome grandfather clock… and along the opposite wall stretches an outsize in high-backed winged settees upholstered in glowing burgundy. There is a dramatic contrast here between the mirrored reflections of dark polished woods, the gleaming white ornamental ceiling and portico, and the time- defying Persian carpet… The antique chairs, covered in regency brocade are feather-light… Several twin-light wall brackets supplement the ceiling lights. Paintings of Flemish and Scottish scenes hang in groups from brass rods. The green and chartreuse fitted carpet makes a perfect complement to its white and gold background. Round the white marble fireplace the ornate brass fender makes a glittering splash… Nevertheless, despite the extravagance, the residence was only used privately for thirteen years. After McLean died in 1907 he ensured that his wealth and mansion would be left to help others who were less fortunate than himself. Under the provisions of his will, McLean stated that his mansion was to be used as an institute, providing ‘a home for women of refinement and education in reduction or straitened circumstances’. The mansion remained an institute for thirty-eight years, before it was sold to the Health Department and used as a dental nurses’ hostel in 1955. During the 1950s a lack of staff was a major problem for the New Zealand School Dental Service; however, McLean’s Mansion made it possible to launch a recruitment drive as many new trainees could be offered board and lodge in the large building. The only consequence of this alteration was that after the sale of the premise most of the extravagant furniture was taken away as it was not suitable for the building’s new purpose. The building remained a hostel up until 1977; after this time, though, the house stood empty for ten years while the government sought to find a new use for the building. Eventually, by 1987, the old mansion was purchased by Christchurch Academy, a vocational training organisation. Today, McLean’s Mansion is something of an oddity that stands out as belonging to a different era because it is surrounded by modest residential houses and modern commercial buildings. What is more, McLean’s Mansion was badly damaged in the 2011 Canterbury earthquake and, despite its Category I heritage status, the Canterbury Earthquake Authority (CERA) immediately issued a demolition notice. However, this caused a public outcry by the local community. As things stand, all demolition plans were halted, but the owners of the premises have not been able to find a buyer who is willing to restore the property. The cost to restore the building is estimated to be $12 million. Our Version of Events It’s always good popping back through Christchurch and seeing how the city is slowly being brought back to life. Compared to what we saw when we first arrived in 2014, things are certainly looking very different! Having said that, there are still plenty of abandoned things to see, especially in the suburbs. So, after a quick drive around the city to see how the reconstruction projects are going, that’s precisely where we headed. Our aim this time round, though, or at least part of our overarching aim, was to visit McLean’s Mansion because it’s still standing but may not be there for much longer. After all, it has been left to rot and crumble for six years now. All things considered, it didn’t take us too long to find the building. We would like to suggest that it was our awesome detective skills that helped us locate the mansion, but the fact it stands out like a sore thumb compared to everything else surrounding it is probably the real reason we found it so easily. Maybe a sore thumb isn’t a good comparison, though, because the mansion’s architecture is stunning compared to everything else nearby. Anyway, we’re digressing, this time round we were much more cautious as we sought to find a way inside. Unlike the good old days when the city was a veritable free-for-all, there have been massive improvements in security in recent years as there are certain people who have grown intolerant of people sneaking around Christchurch’s abandoned buildings. For instance, the recent rumour is that the mansion has been fitted with alarms and sensors. Whether this is true of course is another matter. Fortunately, it seemed the alarms were taking a quick break when we entered the property, and no one turned up to turf us off the premises. This left us with enough time to have a good look around and grab some snaps. Our overall opinion of the place is that it is looking very fucked these days, owing to the deadly combination of vandalism and earthquakes that have plagued it for the past six years or so. Now, rubble is scattered absolutely everywhere throughout the mansion, and several sections of wall have collapsed altogether. The place reeks of mould, mixed with a dusty woody scent, too, probably on account of the fact that the building is still largely a wooden construction. This is not to suggest the building is uninteresting, though. In fact, the architecture is pretty unique and much different to anything we’d find in the UK. There were a few oddities to be found in the mansion as well, such as a dentist’s chair and the legendary staircase decorated with well-known Scottish flowers. All in all, then, we’d suggest that McLean’s Mansion is a place worth visiting. Hopefully, if some funding is found to repair and strengthen the structure, it will continue to be an important part of the city’s heritage for many years to come. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26:
  3. UK Crookham Court April 2013

    Shot a few years ago before all the vandalism. No edits just a walk around. Was such a lovely place then. I believe restoration work is now well ongoing. This is great to hear. Thanks for looking I got plenty more films in the pipeline.
  4. Gledhow Grove, built in the 1820's was designed by architect John Clark in Greek Revival style. Chapel Allerton Hospital was opened in may 1927 by HRH Princess Mary, It was run by the Ministry of Pensions and cost £130,000. It replaced the old military hospital at Becketts Park in Leeds, catering for patients who had been injured in the Great War, specializing in the fitting of appliances and false limbs to war veterans. The hospital closed in 1994, the old hospital buildings were demolished and the Grade II listed mansion has been left derelict with new housing built in the grounds. In early 2008, filing cabinets containing patients' details were found inside the basement of the hospital after it had already been sold on. As most of this place has already been converted I only got to explore the mansion part of it. What's unique about this building is how different the layout is to your average hospital, and it still had lots of character despite being so wrecked. Some of the floors that we saw above had completely fallen through with the entire carpet hanging down, probably one of the most far-gone places I've seen.
  5. One of the most iconic houses in the portuguese urbex panorama in one of my first explorations with my 60D. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20
  6. Spain An Old Mansion

    A few weeks ago I explored this beautiful mansion. I hope you like it!
  7. Built in the 18th century, Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England. The house has amazing views over the Thames and central London can be seen in the distance. The house is named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786. A 125-foot-long gallery was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. It housed a considerable collection of paintings including works by Titian and El Greco. Both the house and gallery are Grade II listed, and planning permission for rennovation with some alterations has been granted. The house was put on the market in 2012 with a guide price of £15 million. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The Main House The Gallery
  8. My first contribution on this forum. An abandoned countryside manor somewhere in the north of my home country, Portugal. Hope you like it #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21
  9. Hi everyone, this is the historic Fisher-Byington House in Danville, Kentucky. It's a large, brick antebellum mansion that is sadly slated for demolition in the coming weeks. It would have been saved most likely had it not been for the fact that it now finds itself located in the middle of a business district, and not among other homes of its era.
  10. Visiting an old mansion, her garden and an old factory near the abandoned mansion.
  11. Stanford Hall is a large 18th century, grade II listed country house in the UK. Since being used as a private residence the house has had a couple of different uses which have unfortunately removed a lot of the buildings splendour. A number of failed redevelopment projects were started, and recently a planning application has been approved to develop the building into a Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre. An extension added an impressive Art Deco theatre in the 1930s which still remains in perfect condition. Murals decorate the walls and the ceiling features painted clouds. A Wurlitzer organ is built into the orchestra pit. 1. Rear elevation Our visit Spider Monkey and I had noticed this place was unoccupied so thought we would go and check it out. Although the place has lost a lot of its grandeur over the years and the failed developments have further detracted, the building is still very impressive. The theatre was my personal highlight. Sadly, I understand the theatre will be pulled down. 2. Sunburst into grand room 3. Fireplace and elegance 4. More grand rooms 5. The "Kitkat" room 6. Top of the stairs 7. Looking down the stairs 8. Staircase and fireplace 9. Theatre lobby 10. The stunning theatre 11. In the aisle of the theatre 12. Looking back 13. Wurlitzer Organ 14. Safety curtain with depiction of the hall 15. Original 1930s Brenkert Master Brenograph projector 16. Projector detail 17. Spotlight and record player 18. Film reel room 19. Film reels 20. Entrance hall 21. Ballroom 22. Ballroom 23. Wood panelled room 24. Bedroom 25. Bedroom 26. Grand room upstairs 27. Marble bathroom 28. Squash courts 29. Front of the house 30. Back of the huge property
  12. History This report looks at some of the abandoned cliff top mansions on the outskirts of Christchurch. The damage to the mansions themselves during the 2011 earthquakes was significant to say the least, and as the cliff itself collapsed it took many of the buildings with it. Although demolition has begun, against the protests and campaigns of those who own them, the majority of the stricken homes remain, posed precariously over the side of the cliff. It is estimated that hundreds of million dollar mansions will be demolished in the coming months (330 alone in the red zone), however progress is often stalled due to bad weather which causes the land in the area to become more unstable; concerns are tied in with the knowledge that water can seep into the myriad of cracks found within the cliff which initiates substantial ground weakening. Construction workers reported that it took more than eighteen months to devise a safe demolition plan, and ground conditions are continually monitored. Alarms have been placed in the key demolition areas, and they are triggered by unusual ground movement and instability. Initially, the use of explosives were considered, but those plans were quickly disregarded for fear of bringing the whole cliff down onto the buildings and roads that lie within close proximity beneath it. Since then ‘unmanned’ drones have been used to assess the structural damage of every structure, to calculate whether human demolition crews can enter each property. Once unspoiled and seamless, offering picturesque views as they overlook Sumner Beach, the mansions now stand cracked and broken. Pools and terraces sit empty, and only vacant chairs remain; taking in those spectacular views alone as they look out to sea. The first to be successfully dismantled was a six bedroom property, formerly valued at $2.28 million – re-evaluated to be worth less than a dollar. Although it was reported that the houses had been entirely cleaned out, it is at this stage worth mentioning that many people were in fact unable to reclaim their belongings and alongside full fridges sit the remains of people’s lives. Many people were forced to flee for their lives and were unable to grab their possessions as they left. Being conscious of this, I have tried to limit the photographs to reveal fewer personal items and effects, to give viewers a taste of the destruction rather than entirely invade other people’s privacy. Our Version of Events As for our little escapade; having aggravated the church royally on our last quest, we decided to leave the city for a short while, and worked our way towards the outskirts to seek out the fabled lost mansions of the Port Hills area. Now, despite the fact that they’re on top of an enormous cliff that towers above the city, we spent a good while struggling to find them; not sure what happened there. After much searching, we eventually found ourselves at the bottom, near an entire abandoned school which is directly underneath (they still mow the lawn and maintain it however), staring up in awe at bits of mansion poking out over the edges of the cliff – the next challenge though was to find our way to the top. The roads leading up to the Port Hills mansions are narrow and winding, and it is easy to mistake entire side roads for driveways. This is what we did for the next hour or so, as we became more confused in the maze of carnage (we wanted to get to the uppermost buildings which were situated at the highest point, so we passed many damaged structures). In the end we ditched the car and continued on foot, sneaking past the folks whose houses were somehow unaffected, until we finally reached what we were looking for. The damaged was far greater than I expected; although looking back I’m not exactly sure why I imagined it to be any less that what it was. These were some of the worst affected buildings I’ve seen in Christchurch. Staircases were dislodged, entire walls teetering – held together by a few crumbling fragments – and rooms completely distorted and buckled as we walked across their floors. Many of the mansions have ‘no-go’ lines drawn across at certain points, indicating which part of the building is slanting over the edge of the cliff. There’s not very much to stop a curious person stepping over those lines however, even with the knowledge that you will face imminent death if the structure did decided to topple over the side. Pushing those thoughts aside, guided instead by an awesome curiousity, we managed to explore several of the mansions and small gardens. Still, I should hasten to add that curiousity is a dangerous phenomenon, and sometimes you can overstep the mark; we did this by peering into an old chest freezer in a garage. I lost a few sensors in my nose after that one. Explored with Nillskill. 1: Private pool and terrace 2: Extensive structural damage 3: Poolside chair 4: Kitchen contents 5: The lost bedroom 6: Decaying toys 7: Former bedroom 8: Bathroom (toilet roll rack - nothing better than being prepared!) 9: Living room mirror 10: Someone left the dog behind 11: Fireplace 12: Store cupboard in the garage 13: Mansion exterior 14: Mock European style mansion 15: Crumbling walls 16: Main hallway 17: Looking down the corridor 18: Dining room and kitchen 19: The kitchen 20: Looking into the living room 21: View from the living room 22: The patio - positioned over the cliff 23: The cliff - suddenly a lot closer 24: A broken kitchen 25: Tentative steps 26: The main street 27: Broken letter box 28: Someone's former living room 29: Patio door barely clinging onto life 30: A studio style bedroom
  13. So I was rather lucky to have around 4 hours of undisturbed exploring inside here, despite a half naked model on the stairs and a photographer inside shouting "bit more". It seemed secca had the day off, as the hours passed more explorers turned up who each came in two's and threes. I have to admit I never saw the fascination with the main stairs for a photo, the rooms I found more enjoyable. (yet will include a few shots of the stairs anyway). So I explored here undisturbed and left on my own free will before I left an old gent walked in, sandals and a small compact camera, he had to be around mid 60's/70 years old, he strolled in seemed chuffed with himself and began taking some photos for the "holiday album" anyway enough was enough, an decided to head home for some tea! Obviously many people know the history, but has anyone seen the gravestone near the front? ... I heard about it but never spotted it?!?! - oh well. Anyway below is some history -(stolen from web) followed up with my usual style of photos! The Actors' Orphanage was started in 1896 by Kittie Carson at Croydon and was established as the Actors' Orphanage Fund in 1912. In 1915 the Orphanage moved to Langley Hall at Langley (was in Buckinghamshire - now in Berkshire). The orphanage was both a home and a school to approximately 60 children. At ages 15–17 pupils sat the School Leaving Certificate of Cambridge University and if 10 subjects were taken to Matriculation. The home and school was moved to Silverlands at Chertsey, Surrey in 1938 where it remained until 1940. In September 1940 the Orphanage was evacuated to the USA where the children were housed in New York City at the Edwin Gould Foundation, and the children were sent to local schools. After the war ended the Fund established a home (once again at Silverlands, Chertsey). This arrangement ended in 1958 and the Actors' Orphanage ceased to exist. The 1912 fund was re-established as the Actors' Charitable Trust and financial and care help was offered to those in need. Over the years many from the theatrical profession have given time and money to the running of the orphanage including some who became presidents of the orphanage among whom are Sir Gerald du Maurier, Noël Coward, Laurence Olivier and the last president Lord Attenborough. In 1990 Silverlands Nursing School amalgamated with other schools of nursing in Surrey and Hampshire to become the Francis Harrison College of nursing and midwifery. At some point in the late 1990’s Silverlands ceased it’s role as a nursing school and the National Probation Service was looking for a new site for the ‘residential assessment and intervention programmes for adult males with allegations of, or convictions for, sexual offences involving children’. Silverlands in Chertsey was considered the most appropriate. The proposal was met with strong opposition from local people who organised a candlelit vigil to protest about the site being used for such a purpose and were concerned about the impact of the 7000 children attending the 25 schools within a 2.5 mile radius of Silverlands. After a lot of debating and protests on 4th July, 2002, it was confirmed by the Home Office Minister that Silverlands will not become the home of the Wolvercote paedophile clinic. However during this time, the Grade 2 listed building had already had £3.7 million pounds spent on its refurbishment. It remains disused, As always cheers for looking, an hope you enjoyed my take on this popular place!
  14. Hello again, OS. Second report today This one definitely needed a revisit as I needed to get some proper shots, was not pleased with mine the first time. Some history on the place (copied from my original report): For all their fame and social clout, the Harlechs seemed forever dogged by sadness, with three fatal car crashes, a suicide, financial distress and awful luck. The 46-year-old Tory peer is inviting offers of more than £5 million for the hall, considered to be one of the finest classical buildings of its generation. However, it has been abandoned for 15 years and before that it was used as a telephone exchange. Lord Harlech only inherited the title because his brother, Julian, committed suicide by shooting himself in a Fulham flat at 33. The circumstances were particularly tragic as his father, the ambassador to Washington who almost married Jackie Kennedy after her husband's assassination, inherited the title when his brother died after his car veered off a country lane, hitting a telegraph pole. The sixth baron's mother, Sylvia or "Sissie", died in 1967 when her car skidded on a wet road and hit another vehicle. In another terrible coincidence, his father died in 1985 in a similar crash. Since his father's death, Lord Harlech's life has been one long struggle to make ends meet. Visited with Behind Closed Doors. Pics: Cheers for looking
  15. I visited here with Lavino and a non member Tom, This was our second visit to the mansion ( as the first time I didn't have my own camera ) and unlike our first visit we managed to get to the upper floors. And people have been saying a lot that this place is un safe and I totally agree with them . On the upper floors it is a lot more decayed than the ground floors as Lavino learned when trying to open a door. We also managed to get onto the roof which has an amazing view and is just a great place to sit down for a few minutes. On the way out we decided we would look for the grave of the owners horse which we thought we saw in the middle of the crops, but when we got to it it was just a lion statue after we took some pictures of it the farmer came with his quad and gun, and he didn't look very happy ( guess it didn't help we were in the middle of his crops ). Anyway here is a bit of history and some pictures hope you enjoy . The mansion was built around 1580 for the Winstanley family. It is a Grade II listed building and also listed as a Ancient Scheduled Monument. The Winstanleys owned this Elizabethan Hall until 1596, when the estate was sold to James Bankes, a London goldsmith and banker. Extra blocks were added in the 17th and 18th centuries. Further and extensive alterations were made in 1811-19 by Lewis Wyatt in a Jacobean style.. To the south, on lands belonging to the hall, is a small stone building which was used to house bears that provided entertainment for the hall's guests The stable court and other buildings to the side of the main house are a prize example of English eccentricity, designed with a heady mix of Norman, Tudor and Baroque motifs. They were built by Meyrick Bankes II a colourful character who travelled extensively in Europe and America and adorned his grounds with statues of animals and monsters The Bankes family retained ownership of the hall until the 21st century when it was sold for private development. The hall had been kept in good condition until the 1960s when habitation stopped. As the building decayed and the cost of maintaining the mansion was too much for the family it was sold on and any intended plans for redevelopment have failed leaving the building to decay rapidly.
  16. Rougham Hall is a Grade II listed manor house, a largely 19th-century building on the site of the former Jacobean manor. During its restoration in 1878 it had added to it a staircase dated from circa 1700 taken from Finborough Hall, in Suffolk. It is the ancestral home of the North family, descendants of Dudley North, 4th Baron North, and his son, the lawyer Roger North. Rumored to have been in residence was the army and during ww2 was used as storage for warheads and ammo in various scattered bunkers. Our first time here was amazing! we turned up to what we have only see on pictures and to be amazed at what we saw, not only was this building in a bad state of decay but extremely dangerous. The first part you notice upon a drive or walk is the long road leading up to this remarkable grade II listed building and a feel of urgency that "im not supposed to be here" haha like thats ever stopped a explorer Your then greeted by the clock tower and the ruin of where the "former" kitchen would of once been, plus seen as the building was hit by a 2000lb german bomb and rumored to of been knocked off its foundations part since have had to be demolished see picture below for the "frozen in time" clock tower stuck on 12:05 since the bomb hit! When you walk around the building on approach you see the back end of the manor house in all its glorly extensive damage and more. The front and what may have been your route into the hall and ornamental gardens Extensive damage ment we had to tread with extreme caution, rotten walls and decayed brick made the remaining structure extremely unsafe and load creaks to be heard. Given the level of evidence gathered the bomb entered the last remaining turret roof crashing down through the floors smashing into the cellars and causing such ground force that the building was forced off its foundations meaning that the last turrets joining the kitchen areas to the gatehouse and clock tower was demolished due to danger and severe structural conditions. This stunning place was once a great place to be judging from old pictures and its a sad example of what war did to us. we will return one day and hopefully find its been cared for so it last for more generations to come. Uk Uncovered Team
  17. All credit for finding this goes to my friend I made shortly before my trip out, we decided to meet up and explore together and at some point along the way he mentioned he had spotted an until this point unexplored mansion whilst heading to a pet store (or something like that). So with the skies grey and the afternoon ending we headed off to have a look and see what we could find. Sure enough, there was the mansion alright - and with no idea of what level of security it had, whether we would be spotted by the neighbours due to it being in quite a residential area full of similarly large houses with owners probably no stranger to calling the police over suspicious activity (this area being a stones throw away from a real bad area of town) it was sure to be an interesting one as neither of us had any idea what to expect when we got in. It turned out to be way better than either of us expected with an extremely cool assymetrical staircase going up the three floors to the attic. It had a very odd feel because walking into the ground floor there was the distinct smell of fresh paint but in other areas the 'new' paint had peeled and cracked, and brand new plasterboard had fallen from the ceiling where water had gotten in. And the attic was covered in crappy tags. At an educated guess, the house had begun to be done up before the winter set in, they had repainted and re-plasterboarded up to the attic but then winter came and screwed everything up. So will it remain empty once the spring sets in? I don't know. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651102524727/
  18. Hello again y'all. Now this one is really special.. After researching a lead, Andy de Kay and I were getting pretty excited about what we could potentially see. Pretty relaxed explore, however we were threatened to have our cameras smashed up if we didn't delete all our photos.. "Format that camera or i'll format it with a rock!" Well.. good ol' card switcheroo.. Anyway.. SHOTS: Entrance Staircase Staircase from the bottom Drawing room Gold room Mid-staircase Nice rooms upstairs too We found this sat upstairs, perhaps from a previous redevelopment scheme Another random old picture to the right Mural room Main corridor Best bathroom Upstairs room Pink entrance Here's the best bit... A more modern extension to the house.. We look further.. Through a door and it's pitch black. Andy finds a light switch and... HOLY SH*T! Notice those awesome mural walls.. We found these upstairs too.. DAMN Check out Behind Closed Doors' Magpie Hall Report Cheers guys..
  19. Built in the 19th century, most recently used as a retirement home. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
  20. Hello there! Second port of call of the euro trip day two! Liked this one, sadly wrecked but does have a nice entrance hall and staircase and some nice bits of furniture dotted around. Not a lot of history here. Anyway, on with the pics: Cheers, SM
  21. UK Carol's Place

    Just one of the locations on the second day of the Smelly Sheep weekend (name decided by AndyK!). Really enjoyed this one, been wanting to see it for a long time, sure some things have gone missing over time the the carpets and the furniture but this place still holds enough features to be called AWESOME. Pics: AndyK!: The Library The Red Room Wicked Ceiling The White Room Cheers, SM
  22. UK Chaise Abbey - January 2014

    - Unexposed Exploration is back with my first report of the year! & i promise to do a new post every week starting now!! Back at the beginning of the year myself and "Adam X" visited Chaise Abbey before the tour buss arrived and ruined if for everyone! The Explore: The cold foggy morning in january we set off on the 4+ hour drive to the only location of the day "Chaise Abbey" when we arrived it was still pitch black. We where sitting in the car waiting for sun to come up a little more when a car pulled in behind us! Police ? Secca ? It cant be all over already ? No thankfully it was more explorers, So we quickly left and started the walk to the location. It was only until i checked my phone and i had 3 texts saying "Is that you guys at "chaise abbey" and we realised we would not be the only explorers this weekend. When we where inside the grounds of the abbey the aim was to get inside as quickly as possible, Getting inside via the smallest entry on the hole building. Once inside we follow the sound of people talking to find out who else is around and where greeted with more explorers. We all broke up and spent a good 3-4 hours inside before meeting 2 more explorers and then leaving, getting some quick externals on the way out. Amazing explore, One of the best buildings i've seen to date!! (sorry about the mix and match with my watermark) Finally on with the photos..... Thanks for looking everyone, comments/feedback is always welcome! More photos from this location over at my page - Unexposed Exploration
  23. This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside. It's a really beautiful site, you could spend all day taking pictures in here and it's amazing to imagine people in the basement transmitting messages to our spies in Europe during the war. I had a strange feeling of sadness come over me as I was walking away from the place, difficult to explain why but it was a bit weird, I think perhaps I fell a little bit in love with the place. Massive thanks to Jones-y-Gog for inviting me to see this one and providing excellent company, cheers fella! The false door, everyone should have one of these!! This fireplace dates back to 1617, it even has the year carved into the wood. Thanks for looking.
  24. Visited here after being thrown out by security over the road.LOL. was my first day time explore (shame about the weather),was a proper day out. couldn't believe how easy it was to find. P farm also known as the former home of MR Pym Honorary Consul For somewhere and his family. The property was renovated in 2005 ready for the Pym family to move in. They lived here until 2007. Timber Latvia LTD was a company registered to P farm which was incorporated in 2010 but later dissolved. the property has been on the market for close to a million pound.not loved and not sold! Last occupants left in 2009. An application has been received to demolish existing buildings and build a 48 bedroomed residential rehabilitation centre. Its users would include people with alcohol and drugs dependencies and mental illness. MARCH 2014 :The Stocks Hall Nursing & Care Group will display its plans for a rehab centre during a public exhibition at Charnock Richard FC. The application follows the withdrawal of previous proposals to convert green-belt P Farm,, last March, following concerns raised by people about the plans, mainly the treatment of specific conditions that would be offered to patients. It had been recommended for refusal by council planning officers. The updated proposals have reduced the size of the building by 12 per cent, and rooms from 48 to 42. Also, the facility no longer proposes to treat those suffering from drug or sexual behavioural 
issues. This 6 bedroomed extended detached house is beautifully situated with breathtaking views over open countryside, set within its own grounds and in approximately 20 acres of land. with stables, paddocks, woodland and extensive gardens. The building had some interesting features but was a mix match of tastes and styles. was well worth the visit. Shame the vandals are hitting such a great bachelor pad!!!!!!!!!!! such a waste sitting empty!!!!!!!!!!!!! sorry for lack of history before consulate i did search :0( big thanks for looking guys :0)
  25. I went to visit my mate who lives in nowheresville, Lincolnshire, and on the way stopped to visit a couple of sites. Our primary target was sadly not accessible, so made a slight detour to look at Ferdowse clinic and Nocton hall military hospital. I have visited Nocton before, and although we had a good look round the hall last time, we ran out of daylight before we could finish the hospital, so a return trip was needed. The site is very big, with lots of large wards and endless corridors. Got to see some different areas than last time, so was worth a revisit. Explore with Miz Firestorm Some history; Nocton Hall was acquired by the Air Ministry in 1940 and turned into an RAF Hospital, and in 1943 the Americans took possession of the Hall and grounds for a second time. Nocton became home for the United States Army Seventh General Hospital and the Hall was used as the Officers’ Club. At the end of the War in 1945 the RAF selected Nocton Hall to be their permanent hospital for the county of Lincolnshire. RAF Nocton Hall was a 740 bed hospital under RAF control until 1984, used by civilians and forces personnel, one of the country’s undisputed RAF Hospitals. The decision to close Nocton Hall as a military hospital was taken on 31st March 1983. And finally, the mansion Thanks for looking folks
×