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Found 17 results

  1. Another derp installement from my ventures North. History (stolen from Secret Scotland) Inchindown fuel depot lies in the hills some four miles north of Invergordon, and was constructed in the period 1939-1942, during World War II, as a bombproof fuel oil store for the Royal Navy, and was connected by pipeline to the Royal Navy dockyard, fuel depot, and port facility at Invergordon. The depot was also referred to as Inchindoun, and the Inchindown Admiralty Underground Storage Depot. Reports indicate that five such stores were constructed around the country at the time: Inchindown, Copenacre, Hartham Park, Monk's Park and Portsdown. Had the German Navy blockaded Britain's ports, these depots would have been called on to provide fuel for the Royal Navy. The depots stored Furnace Fuel Oil (FFO): Medium viscosity, boiler NATO Code No: F-82; Joint Service Designation: 75/50 FFO. FFO is basically the residue left behind after the fractional distillation of crude oil, and resembles treacle when at room temperature. Phased out by the Royal Navy in favour of diesel fuel in the late 1970s, it was last used by Leander class frigates, Falklands veteran aircraft carrier HMS Hermes, and the Royal Yacht Britannia. The depot contains six storage cells, five being 237 metres long and 9 metres tall/wide (roughly 800 feet long and 30 feet tall/wide), holding up to 5.6 million gallons, and a smaller sixth tank, 170 metres long. The first tank carries a plaque commemorating the date February MCMXLI (1941). The access tunnels are a mixture of lined (from the portals), and unlined construction at the rear of the cells, where the access panels are located. The Explore These storage tanks are normally sealed and only permission visits are allowed, we chanced our luck and nipped in past as we were in the area, luckily the door was unlocked! After some initial hesitations I went for the access into the tanks, I am a fat small bastard, so i laid down on the stretcher and was pushed through the pipe. shoulders scrapped sides it was mega tight, but I was in! Sadly I only had my trusty P7.2 with me so the shots didn't come out well enough to post them all, abut another visit with better lighting options will happen! Thats all there is really, thanks for looking.
  2. Poland Oil Power Plant - July 2015

    “This one will be something different than you might except†We found this location from the road. Tall chimney looming from the distance. In an area where only fields could be seen such structure makes you wonder what it really is. Since I was the driver I made a short decision. We have to check it out even if we had some plans already. Driving through wheat fields we reached some kind of industrial complex. We could notice that now most of the building were in use by some small companies that were using old production halls. Later searching the web I discovered that all those structures were once occupied by a flax processing plant / linen factory. Passing by all those adapted buildings we reached our destination – that tall chimney. It was located just in the center of the industrial complex. From outside it looked like an power plant/boiler. Later it turned out it served exactly this type of function. Building made out of red brick. Same with the chimney. Built by the Germans (during WWII) in 1942. Once it used to serve as power/heat source for all production halls. Since the factory has been liquidated and all production halls are now used by small companies the factory complex is open (I could park my car just next to the building). The power/heat is not needed anymore and from outside it looked that the power plant is shut off. We had a bit of difficulties to get in. Big steel door locked tight from any direction. Finally we found one sliding door which base could be moved and we were able to enter crawling on our bellies. First we entered the basement (not really interesting, lot of dust, dark space under the big hall in which there were furnaces). Finally we found the stairs and we entered the main hall of the power plant. The main instruments generating power had to be decommissioned/sold/removed. There was just the space, smell of motor oil. We found a small control room, engineer quarters. The inside of the building was interesting from the architectural point of view. There was also the hum of a transformer. One door was closed and we could guess that the power had to be switched here somehow – coming from some more modern power plant. Here the story could end and in general I wouldn’t even bother to share those picture I made back then here. But … there is another end to the story. We re-visited that place after one month. It turned out that 20 days later after our first visit someone started a fire in that place. Since there was still a lot of metal that could be salvaged someone tried to use some kind of torch. There was still a lot of the oil in the basement of the building. It lit up like a match. In the end 26 fire fighter units had to come to put the fire down. And so … this is what is left. If you have been in an abandoned structure you might know how it looks … have you revisited a structure after a massive fire ? Unfortunately a massive storm was coming when we revisited this place and I was unable to get exactly same angles of the shots .. but it will give you an idea anyway. The main hall – it used to host electric generators and after the fire On the right from the main hall there was a door. Behind it a stairs leading towards the engineer quarters And after it burned down An electric switchboard with all the gauges and controllers still feeding the power from the transformer and after the fire There was a small engineer room included in the main hall After the fire there is not much left from it The main from another angle looked like this. Door on the right open to another Hall in which there used to be furnaces but after the fire … its something totally different A big valve was still there before the fire but now and … of course … now there is no roof. Soon there will be trees growing here It seems we were the last people to immortalize this structure before the fire. Sad part it could be adapted somehow. Now … it will just decay. If you want to be more up to date with my finds or you want to see more photos (I dont share them all here for obvious reasons) visit my flickr or fb page.
  3. Wasn't going to bother with a report as to be fair there may be one from about 4 years ago from me,well it was this mixed with another place.. Anyhow its sunday and im so very bored so here's some pics from a recent less crowded trip Brief stolen history Pictors And an odd portrait one cos i dont have another to match it up Nothing new by any means but i was killing time in here so be rude not to grab some more updated pics
  4. Another from my first big roadtrip, and the original main aim of the trip! After a few hours kip in my mates house we awoke to another dismal day, grey skies and persistant rain but we weren't to be put off, no, we had one thing in mind and it was a big one! I'd seen this place pop up about a year before this visit and as soon as I saw it it went to #1 on my 'to see' list and it's fair to say it didn't disappoint even though areas had been absolutely raped by pikeys. It was a frustrating location to get round as well as a lot of the warehouse areas had been breezeblocked up after they were emptied so some inventive climbing was required to get to the tasty bits - this had the added bonus of course of keeping all but the most determined idiots at bay. Sadly the weather meant the access route into the huge automated warehouse building was just too dangerous so we missed that which was a shame. The storage tank farm at one end of the site was removed a year or so ago and shipped off to a new life in Poland, I think the rest of the site is still there but I've not seen anything from it for a year or so now. This place satisifed the triple-P rating - Pure Pipe Porn! Thanks for looking more here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157627743997699/
  5. This set of tunnels is located just West of the tunnels known as the Oil Mills, in the Limekiln Street area of Dover. It is likely that the tunnels were originally the result of chalk being mined for lime burning in the nearby kilns during the 19th Century. The five roughly parallel tunnels are cut directly into the chalk cliff face with adjoining passages between, and have very high ceilings and evidence of originally having a second floor. The caves were used as a Bonded Store to house goods awaiting payment of customs tax and later as an air raid shelter and temporary fire station during WW2. These tunnels have been known by a number of names over the years, including 'Finnis Hill Caves', 'Champagne Caves' and simply 'Oil Mill Cave'. The area in front of the caves (part of the Pier District) has been greatly modified with the expansion of the harbour, Finnis Hill and Limekiln Street having been demolished. The caves were used by Hammonds to store fruit, until the building of the new road in the 1990s, which left the main entrance below ground level. The only access remains from a second floor doorway. (History borrowed from http://www.subterraneanhistory.co.uk/20 ... dover.html) Visited withe Frosty and Jesus. Just a few photos from here. Thanks for looking. Maniac.
  6. Now then. Recently Maniac, Frosty and I went out for a spot of Dover derping and this is "wot we done" South trollands #1: Troll mills west: Thanks to the guys for an entertaining evening out, and thanks to you for looking in, R. Jewson
  7. I visited this 3 years back, only had point n shoot camera at the time and hadn't realized that it could do 60 second exposures so have been meaning to go back for a revisit to get some pics, Visited with Space Invader and Dan H. A brief bit of History ; These tunnels have served many different purposes over time, undoubtedly as air raid shelters during both World Wars and for storage. Today the lower tunnels are still in use for storage and workshop space, whereas the upper level has not been used for some considerable time. Most of the tunnel is lined with concrete. The major problem with this tunnel is that it is saturated with water. Several years ago a huge fire in the lower tunnels left the walls greatly weakened. And for a few Of my Pics Plan Dan and Space Invader having a bit of fun And now for my turn utilizing what Dan had left behind My thanks to Space Invader and Dan H for a thoroughly good evening
  8. These tunnels in Limekiln Street were most likely dug in the early to mid 19th Century to extract chalk for burning and turning into lime. Map of the tunnels The limekilns, which gave the street its name, were located nearby. It is probable that the lime and excavated chalk were used in the construction of Dover Harbour. Almost cavernous in places, the extent of these tunnels is impressive and it is not surprising they've had many uses over the years including WW2 shelters and storage. The tunnels are cut directly into the cliff, some are very short and end after a few feet, whereas others go back a few hundred feet and join up, the ceilings are up to 30ft high in places. There is much evidence of alteration over the years, including the addition of blast walls.
  9. A few film shots I've taken from Oil Mills West: I won't bother with the history as its been put on here enough. Top 4 taken with a 8mm Samyang Fisheye, using a 35mm film it was true 8mm as opposed to my crop sensor dslr giving a reading of 12.8mm, this meant I had to crop into the centre of the photo due to the lens hood of the lens creating a vignette around the entire image. Bottom 2 taken with a Canon EF 35-80 F4-5.6
  10. Visited with Space Invader,Wevsky & Swampdonkey Oil Mills West, built circa 1800's originally used for bonded oil storage from what I believe would have been the whale trade, later became used for the military and air raid shelters during WWII On with some pics And finally me being self indulgent ! Well worth a look if ever your'e in the area, this place is truly incredible
  11. After a planned visit to the winchelsea tunnels that failed to happen, myself, snaphappi and a friend from london had a play about in upper oil mills. sparkle man_HDR by dualster, on Flickr 2011-03-05 at 12-59-18 - Version 2 by dualster, on Flickr 2011-03-05 at 12-52-02_HDR by dualster, on Flickr
  12. Right putting the past few days events behind me myself and Unclebulgaria who unfortunately left his battery behind decided to visit both upper and lower oil mills..now I know there is in the lower so i was told a Victorian oil/fuel tank a large one as for digging for hours ignoring all previous posts for info ive decided to opt for a quote ! Right didn’t take a huge amount of pics or climb the many half broken walls in the lower as a revisit when uncle b is fully laden with battery is to be done,but as i know much to some peoples annoyance ive done a report and look i didnt do it the second i got in! on with the pics A map of the upper ,there is a map of the lower its just that seems to cover the other sections within the same area in the street(doe etc) these at one point i believe would all have been linked as the many breezeblock walls show in the lower and this i believe i also read somewhere And now for the few i got in the lower before we decided to call it a night This next photo was just top the left as we came down the stairs..lots of walls lol
  13. Upper Oil Mills 2010

    ........visited with unfairytale thiz morning (18/09/10) at silly o'clock in the morning, only a couple of picz im afraid cheers for looking
  14. Right decided with a few of the guys after they'd had a look at the oil mills upper week or so before when i just wasnt up to it too have a look at the oil mills west..interesting access as ever but once that was over come a very nice visit very huge roofs due to there at one point being 2 floors and the history of it imsure most of you all know by now..after that a quick visit to st.martins battery whioch last time my larger build friends gave up on and this time managed,its pretty burnt out down there but was allways going to have to be done anyways right was expecting my lenser cree torch to arrive this morning which it didnt so pics taken with the lighting ive had too use up and till now..on with the pics Right a few of st.martins!! right youve seen one deep shelter etc etc..but its one knocked of my list..thanks to the guys for the helping hand quite literally at oil mills and thats me done
  15. oil mills - dover 2009

    After getting to dover the other night with a couple of hours to spare, me and a friend decided to go have a look at the oil mills. I have visited this site loads in the past but not since the trees had been cut down so popped up to grab some new photos. Here are a couple of pictures from upper and lower oil mills. the first photo is of the sheltered walkway to the pier. Nothing to do with the oil mills but i like the photo and its my report so HA ok so now for the oil mills thats all for now, when i dig out my other photos i will post a full report on the site and some more pictures showing the layout.
  16. the upper and lower oil mills are a horse shoue shape and have had many usages built before 19th century they were used to store oil in and as air rade shelters in the war this report is for both upper and lower as i took so many pictures i cant differetiate between them guestbook
  17. Visited with Mitch, Swamp Donkey, Maniac and Scrimshady Epic access!!!! funniest thing I've ever seen, sorry bout the dents in the roof of your car Maniac. Great to see this place again, and well played mitch for getting in
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