Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'power'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 55 results

  1. Another drive past find on a trip to Italy last year, never seen pics of it, so we called it Powerplant Percy. It was a sub-station of some sort, but stripped out and not much to see, but it was rather nice inside, so here you have it. Well there you have it, a stripped out shell, but they need a bit of love too, or maybe not, you got this far, so you must have enjoyed it
  2. This place is incredible! Loads of interesting things and live CCTV that you can have a play around with. We could actually see people walking past the building we were in. We heard some noise which we assumed was one of our group, but as we later found out, it was someone locking the door and we got sealed in! History borrowed from: http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/10420-centrale-de-schneider-power-station-france-january-2016/#comment-67316 Opening in the late 1950s Centrale De Schneider was a coal-fired power station in France. The original configuration two turbines made by Cie Electro-Mecanique (the French subsidiary of Brown Boveri) was expanded in the 1970s with the addition of a Rateau-Schneider generator set, bringing the total capacity up to half a gigawatt. The Electro-Mecanique turbines were retired in the early 1990s and all the associated equipment has since been removed. The power station ceased generation a few years ago when the Rateau-Schneider was also taken offline. Thanks for looking!
  3. A recent visit to this old Power Station which has been decommissioned since 2000. A planning application has been approved to demolish it and replace it with a new sustainable energy plant. Although approval was granted in 2012 nothing seems to have happened since. Lots of stuff left in situ and it's all decaying nicely. Some pictures #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15
  4. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  5. Explored with Raz Background; Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site. The Explore; So after a while of lazy chiller exploring days, it was time to once again start the stupid o clock on the motorway listening to crazy dance music heavy enough to make your head swim. Few hours later after driving through some kind of monsoon on the M62 over the Penines we were behind enemy lines in Lancashire and Cheshire. It was light by them time we hit the station, with the live site next door in full swing and trucks rolling in and out of the gates. It would appear that either myself and raz are ninja stealthy... either that or the stories we had heard about it being hard to do were exaggerated because we just waltzed in and plodded around without distribance in the middle of the day. Obviously first stop was to find the turbine hall and the old place did not dissapoint. After seeing reports IM and giggawatt i figured that all the good power stations were abroad, but this is not the case. Complete with turbines, boilers, fans Lostock is an induistrial paradise Photos; Thanks for looking
  6. The Explore So this is one I've been wanting to see for a long time but thought it was either gone now or not accessible.. then I heard otherwise and set off a few after hearing the news. We aimed to get here under cover of darkness after the horror stories of Tata pursuing people privately for trespass on this site. Turns out we got there just a little too early and had to spend an hour or in almost complete darkness listening to the horrendous noise this building makes in the wind. Also quite shocked by quite how close the live areas are to this building, at one point we were literally one door away from the live area! Great adrenaline filled explore this one was though Visited with @Funlester and a non member The History Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site.
  7. This was the first visit of 3 yesterday, we may have got here a little early as it was pitch black and had to wait around for an hour or so for the sun to come up. History - Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site.
  8. closed in the 2000s , may be turned into waste incineration plant still has the turbines and other machinary in place plenty of control rooms and pannels dials and guages nice layer of bird poo is collecting now visited with the elusive may be a bit pic heavy as there was so much to look at thanks for looking more on my flicker https://www.flickr.com/photos/128166151@N05/albums/72157661097528292
  9. Dropped by recently with The_Raw, Mr Grant, DazzaBabes and Bohemian Lad. Haven't been on-site properly since last Christmas when 28dl user Sentinel took on the wharf with his forehead and lost, lots has changed with the new chimney being 90% done and the interior being heavily scaffed up, providing new access routes to places recently less accessible. This scaff is on B side to give an idea, it was possible to clamber over any part of it including the flat level on top which was somewhat unnerving. First of all we headed into Control Room A via a new route and took a few snaps with my new lenses. And then over to B, on the way I noticed a windowed balcony similar to how Control Room A looks out onto the turbine hall, I realised I'd actually managed to get onto the door on the other side of it once before but it was locked then and now that staircase was full of asbestos sheeting and equipment, so we didn't go that route. In the meantime we headed on over to B side switch room. Back on the turbine hall floor we realised there was access to some portals underneath the room I noticed earlier and scaff up to the side of it, found a large discarded statue in some of the rooms below but I didn't snap it (not sure if anyone else did(?)), headed up the scaff beside the room and luckily the whole wall had gone missing. Not much left in the room unfortunately. Flooring and wall tiles along with the windows points towards something being here once, I thought maybe crane controls for the turbine hall. Turns out this was actually the Control Room for B side. ... or something similar to that, I'm a little confused now. After this we headed over to the new chimney to see if there was a way to access what we hoped might be a staircase on the inside, after a lot of crawling about the base of the structure managed to find an entry point to the interior. No easy way up unfortunately from within but was still a novelty, the echo in here is amazing. Was good to go back to Battersea, didn't expect to see anything new so was a nice surprise. Cheers Rawski for inviting us over. EI
  10. One more little surprise post from America! I was going to include this in my miscellaneous round-up thread but I liked the photos too much to shove in there amongst others. I first visited this place near as makes no difference a year ago to the day I visited it this time through a weird coincidence, and during that year it appeared that almost nothing has changed inside other than a litle bit more graffiti. I covered the site in greater detail last year so this time I broke out my 30mm Sigma prime lens for some arty goodness. This power plant was at one point part of a large carpet mill, and has been left abandoned for many years. In the early 2000s the chimney was demolished and the remains of the base can still be seen inside. The decay, the colours and the lighting in here are amazing, ridiculously photogenic. It is one of my favourite locations in the whole world to shoot in and I just wish it wasn't so far away. Thanks for looking, and this really is the end of my American posts...for now.
  11. Ferrybridge power station is situated on the River Aire, in West Yorkshire. It is the third coal-fired power station to be built on the site since 1924. The power station, often referred to as 'Ferrybridge C', first fed electricity into the national grid in February of 1966. Following a comprehensive review of its coal-fired power stations, SSE has taken the difficult decision to close Ferrybridge Power Station by 31st March 2016. Costs at the 48-year-old power station have been rising due its age and environmental legislation, and it is forecast to lose £100m over the next five years. This financial situation, combined with the political consensus that coal has a limited role in the future, means keeping the station open is not sustainable Ferrybridge C has two 198m (650ft) high chimneys and eight 115m (380ft) high cooling tower, which are the largest of their kind in Europe. Unit One (490MW) and Unit Two (490MW) at Ferrybridge power station were opted out of the Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD), and turned off once they used up their allowed 20,000 operating hours at the end of March 2014. Unit Three (490MW) and Unit Four (490MW) have been retrofitted with Flue-gas Desulphurisation (FGD) technology to enable them to comply with the LCPD. They have also been opted-in to the Transitional National Plan under the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) which provides a number of alternative options for how they will operate through to at least the end of June 2020. SSE has not made a decision on how the plant will operate and this will depend on market conditions and the effects of any future capacity mechanism. Having lived within throwing distance of Ferrybridge nearly all my life and passing it god knows how many times I had always wanted to see the inside, obviously I have seen pictures of it before but seeing it with my own eyes was pretty epic, and standing on top of the cooling towers was pretty special! I got rather lucky with this one I was in my dads shop when I got talking to a boss from the power station and he offered to let me go and have a look around the place, I snapped up the chance and headed over asap! Big thanks to him as he took most of the day off to show me around Very pic heavy The control room looked like the inside of a UFO (not that I've been in one ) Continued below
  12. Poland Oil Power Plant - July 2015

    “This one will be something different than you might except†We found this location from the road. Tall chimney looming from the distance. In an area where only fields could be seen such structure makes you wonder what it really is. Since I was the driver I made a short decision. We have to check it out even if we had some plans already. Driving through wheat fields we reached some kind of industrial complex. We could notice that now most of the building were in use by some small companies that were using old production halls. Later searching the web I discovered that all those structures were once occupied by a flax processing plant / linen factory. Passing by all those adapted buildings we reached our destination – that tall chimney. It was located just in the center of the industrial complex. From outside it looked like an power plant/boiler. Later it turned out it served exactly this type of function. Building made out of red brick. Same with the chimney. Built by the Germans (during WWII) in 1942. Once it used to serve as power/heat source for all production halls. Since the factory has been liquidated and all production halls are now used by small companies the factory complex is open (I could park my car just next to the building). The power/heat is not needed anymore and from outside it looked that the power plant is shut off. We had a bit of difficulties to get in. Big steel door locked tight from any direction. Finally we found one sliding door which base could be moved and we were able to enter crawling on our bellies. First we entered the basement (not really interesting, lot of dust, dark space under the big hall in which there were furnaces). Finally we found the stairs and we entered the main hall of the power plant. The main instruments generating power had to be decommissioned/sold/removed. There was just the space, smell of motor oil. We found a small control room, engineer quarters. The inside of the building was interesting from the architectural point of view. There was also the hum of a transformer. One door was closed and we could guess that the power had to be switched here somehow – coming from some more modern power plant. Here the story could end and in general I wouldn’t even bother to share those picture I made back then here. But … there is another end to the story. We re-visited that place after one month. It turned out that 20 days later after our first visit someone started a fire in that place. Since there was still a lot of metal that could be salvaged someone tried to use some kind of torch. There was still a lot of the oil in the basement of the building. It lit up like a match. In the end 26 fire fighter units had to come to put the fire down. And so … this is what is left. If you have been in an abandoned structure you might know how it looks … have you revisited a structure after a massive fire ? Unfortunately a massive storm was coming when we revisited this place and I was unable to get exactly same angles of the shots .. but it will give you an idea anyway. The main hall – it used to host electric generators and after the fire On the right from the main hall there was a door. Behind it a stairs leading towards the engineer quarters And after it burned down An electric switchboard with all the gauges and controllers still feeding the power from the transformer and after the fire There was a small engineer room included in the main hall After the fire there is not much left from it The main from another angle looked like this. Door on the right open to another Hall in which there used to be furnaces but after the fire … its something totally different A big valve was still there before the fire but now and … of course … now there is no roof. Soon there will be trees growing here It seems we were the last people to immortalize this structure before the fire. Sad part it could be adapted somehow. Now … it will just decay. If you want to be more up to date with my finds or you want to see more photos (I dont share them all here for obvious reasons) visit my flickr or fb page.
  13. Lots Road power station (nicknamed the Chelsea Monster) was commissioned in 1905 to provide electricity for the Metropolitan District Railway, now known as the District line. It was originally coal fired and had four chimneys, but when it was converted to oil operation in the 1960's two of them were demolished. In the 1990's it was realised that re-equipping the power station would be necessary if generation of electricity was to continue, but instead it was decided to carry on running the station until the equipment's useful life expired. It shut down on the 21st of October, 2002, and since then all electricity for the London Underground has been supplied from the National Grid. All equipment has been removed and some demolition work has taken place in preparation for conversion into shops, restaurants and apartments. On 30 January 2006 the Secretary of State granted planning permission for the development. In 2007 the developer hoped to complete the scheme by 2013, it has since been delayed by the economic downturn. On 26 September 2013, developer Hutchison Whampoa Properties broke ground on the eight-acre site, rebranding it as "Chelsea Waterfront", with Mayor of London Boris Johnson speaking at the ceremony. The £1bn scheme will be "the biggest riverside development on the north bank [of the Thames] for over 100 years", and will create 706 homes. New planning and design details were conceived between 2010 and 2012. The construction for Phase One (100 apartments) is expected to be completed in 2015/16, and phase two, which includes the power station itself, in 2017/8. I did a rooftop nearby recently (see last pic) and kicked myself for not having bothered with this landmark power station yet, commonly referred to as Battersea's little sister (by me). This was a sole venture after a night in Earls Court with many beers having been consumed. I didn't fancy my chances of success much but it was a good time of day to give it a go and hey presto I was inside. Looking at previous reports not a lot has changed inside here in over 6 years but it still has a certain charm to it due to it's size and art deco design. Unfortunately there was no way I could get to the roof on my own so I may have to pop back with company. Also my pics are a bit drunk so I might return sober as well 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking
  14. 1st Euro jaunt of 2015 and Me, Darbians and a non member kicked off the silly seasons proceedings with this BELTER!! Be forwarned... Theres a fair few pics! ...The Blue Power Station... ... Thanks for lookin' in!
  15. Sometimes the best things do come in small packages, such is the case here... Nestled on the banks of a river deep in rural 'old town America' in a historic town straight out of the early 1800s sits a proper little gem. This small power plant was constructed in 1899 originally as part of an adjacent wood pulping mill but then as a standalone power generating station after the wood mill caught fire in 1925. From reading the notes about the place it houses a complete, intact circa-1905 water turbine which looks more like a UFO from a 1950s sci-fi comic and a water turbine governor from 1925. It produced electricity until the plant was shutdown in 1991 and it has been left to itself, quietly rusting away on the bank of the river. Visited during a snowstorm, the final middle finger of winter after a few lovely spring-like days this is the best one room explore I've ever done. It was so nice to see something so old almost totally unmolested, apart from a small fire in an office to the rear. I only crack out my 30mm on special occasions and this was a place that warranted it's attention. Whilst in one of the tank-like spaces underneath the plant trying to get a half decent photo of the above equipment a work truck rolled past on the road adjacent to the plant between us and the railway tracks, we took that as our cue to leave as we didn't want any hassle, so we left in search of lunch. More here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157649267926013/
  16. The factory consists of a paper mill, a power plant and a boiler house. The oldest buildings date from the 19th century. The factory was finaly closed in the mid 90s. Last weekend I was there again with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and MiaroDigital. The state has unfortunately continued to deteriorate due to vandalism. In the control room, the phone was destroyed and an idiot distributed lubricating oil on the floor of the machine hall. In addition, from the small laboratory also disappeared different things. The following pics are a mix from my 4th and 5th re-visit in June 2014 (marked with *) and March 2015. So don't be surprised because the things described above on the photos are still intact / exist. 1* 2* 3 4 5* 6* 7* 8 9* 10* 11* 12 13 14 15 16 (To this perspective, I was inspired by a picture of Kalum_a.) 17* 18* 19* 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  17. I think most people know the history of this place. It was a power station in Willington (Derbyshire) until the final part closed in late 90's and was subsequently demolished. The only thing left standing now is the 5 cooling towers and the nearby sub station. There isnt a huge amount to see around this site but it is worth a Sunday afternoon mooch if your in the area as there are a few interesting bits and pieces lieing around. Anyway, on to the pics. I wasnt in the area long as it was a late afternoon decision and the light was fading by the end. Also couldn't resist taking the last pic of the graffiti, as it was my initials lol
  18. An industrial "oldie but goldie". In 1913 started the construction of the power plant. Mid-19th century coal, oil and natural gas supplied energy for the area. After closure of a part of the power plant was used as a museum. 2010, the museum was closed and the power station was unfortunately demolished in 2012. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  19. Ahhhhh that's more like it, back to the sneaky sneaky proper non permission visits Late September brought around what was planned as an absolutely mental weekend of explores, which turned out to be a lot easier said than done as neither me nor my American contact factored in the 'awake for 60 hours' part...First stop was a meet-up in a small city in upstate New York, which was once the American home of Carpet weaving/manufacturing. Same old story, once all the mills shut down and the jobs moved abroad, all the money dried up and the city has never recovered. Most of the downtown area is full of empty shops and many many homes are vacant. As it turned out, when we arrived neither of us knew about the epic steep hill that needed to be climbed to get into the actual city as the Amtrak station was right at the bottom of the hill! And in 25+ degrees heat, carrying my life in a large purple bag on my back and my smaller rucksack with cameras etc, and a tripod, it became a real endurance test for me over the three days we travelled around. As is always the case we chose the most ridiculously difficult way into the place and found a hilariously easy way out the other side, but ever since I found this place and put it on my map I had wanted to see it, it's always good doing a power plant but to do one not even the majority of American explorers know about is even better - especially when it comes complete with a pair of late 19th-century turbines. The main mill building is long gone and the smoke stack was brought down in 2006 but the long-vacant power plant remains sat there slowly rusting away, encased by undergrowth. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157648659792079/
  20. Nice to get away from the dull and wet UK for a couple of days, and visit some of the islands derelict offerings in the sunshine. Central Térmica coal fired power station was built in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún, the plant was closed in 1991/92 after a new modern power station was opened in 1986 only 10km away. Enjoyed this very much hence the image heavy report..... .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
  21. This disused power station was once a coal-fired monster. Owned by Belgium's Electrobel it was mothballed in the early 2000s and then finally taken out of service in 2006 and is currently being demolished. With demolition well under way this might be the last we see of this beast. The cooling tower may live on to see another day however and is definitely one of those sites that has to be seen with your own eyes. We had a decent mooch around in there and crawled through the mud to get underneath and then set about crossing the bridge of feral cats towards the power station. We had to dodge the demo team to get inside, they appeared to be pulling it down from the bottom up as the ground floor was mainly stripped out, this caused a lot of dust in the air. We spent a couple of hours inside until the level of dust got too much and made our way out with minimal fuss. It was a shame we didn't find the control room but we saw a lot of other cool stuff and it was a great start to our weekend. Hope you enjoy the pics and thanks to the rest of the crew for making this a great trip! Looking up from the entrance Elliot snapping away No Black Gloves? Too cool for school or too camp for camp? Heading for the power station Quick shaky shot as we ran past the turbine to hide from workers below..... Pipes and Art Deco windows Looking down, the worker's van just visible.... Loved this bit of graff Looking out above the conveyor belt shafts Inside the conveyor belt shaft You could see 3 or 4 storeys directly beneath your feet through these wobbly walkways The view of the Cooling Tower from the roof Overlooking the worker's van in the turbine hall The Lab Last but not least some turbine shots.... Wish we could've had a closer look at these but there was too much of a risk of getting seen unfortunately Thanks for looking
  22. One of the oldest of oldschool Euro locations is Centrale Thermique in Luxembourg, the first derelict power station I can remember seeing photos of. For ages I thought it was demolished until I saw some photos pop up recently and suddenly it was back on the agenda. It may be smashed and bashed to bits but who doesn't love an enormous power station? We chose the most difficult way into the power station possible - despite my assurance to the two I was with I knew of an easier way in they were insistent on using the difficult way in - with me ever fearful of getting collared in what at the end of the day is the fully live quarry the plant is now situated in...but we were in thankfully without getting caught, and chose the easy way out after we had finished! Give me a place like this over a small derp house any day. As ever more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157645998230405/
  23. Hello all, I know this one has been done many times so i hope you see something new from the photos. Brief History of Huncoat Power Station Huncoat power station (also known as Padiham ‘B’) was built by the Lancashire Electric Power Company in the 1950’s as a sister for the power station at Padiham (Padiham ‘A’). Situated on the Burnley coalfield meant that the power station had a ready supply of local coal, and until 1968 was served by a half mile railway line to Huncoat Colliery. The Power Station had a fairly short life, closure coming in 1984. The cooling towers were brought down in 1988 and the main buildings were demolished in 1990, apart from this one building. The derelict building also made the news, here is a quote from the article. 'URBAN explorers armed with spray paint cans have transformed the former Huncoat Power Station into a graffiti paradise. Some of their work has been described by experts as ‘strong’ and ‘creative’, reclaiming a derelict building for art and the community.' My Visit On the weekend of the visit my partner was away so my daughter was left to look after me, so, she chose a nice safe explore for us ..... Ok ok i will start again... As this site is very safe compared to most places we have been, myself and my friend decided it would be safe to take the kids with us. I am glad we did as they really enjoyed themselves looking around at all the graffiti. Even though the site is small we still managed to spend 3 hours here. So many opportunities for pictures with all the amazing colours left on show by the graffiti artists. I was rather surprised how much I enjoyed the time we spent here even with the lack of features. Finally I would like to say thanks to the person who recommended this site to me as a safe explore when you have children. Thanks mate, you know who you are Ok time for some pics.... Outside the Power Station Group Photo Inside Main Room on the ground floor Some of the amazing Graffiti A few shots taken during the day for Giggles No fluids were released in creating this photo! We found an empty spray can on the floor and decided why not! The four kids having fun! I will now finish up with my favourite shot of the day. My daughter loved this graffiti and asked for a photo in front of it. More Images Available on Flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Huncoat Power Station on my Flickr page which can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/119757413@N07/sets/72157645956324051/ Final thoughts Although a small site I enjoyed every minute we spent here. We did see a couple more explorers on the day as well, one talked to us for a short time and the other two that appeared a little later on disappeared into thin air! So, overall a great day with the kids who loved it just as much as the big kids! Thanks for reading, Dugie
  24. Any information about this place? It's near the Dartford crossing behind the Sainsbury's distribution centre and digging around has found out that Littlebrook D is still in use until 2015 but the remaining site is being decommissioned. Some of the buildings have already been demolished according to Google and Bing maps earth view. I think a recce is on the cards. u>.<n
  25. The Explore It doesn't get much more iconic than Battersea Power station. I visited twice with Sentinel, we had a feeling this would be a tricky place to conquer and we weren't wrong. On our first visit we encountered various obstacles and at points we nearly gave up on both control rooms but with a bit of perseverance we managed to access both and escape unseen. Control room A had possibly the biggest wow factor of anywhere I've been so far and immediately made all our efforts worthwhile. Control room B was pretty spectacular in it's own right as well although the more riskier of the two to access. Our second visit was a much slicker operation than the first and allowed us to take a little more time with our photography. The site is constantly evolving through different stages of construction so access points change overnight. Even in three days one door had been sealed and a huge new fence had appeared, perhaps signs that this place won't be accessible for too much longer. Needless to say we were pretty proud of ourselves for making it in and out without being caught and there was much punching of the air as we disappeared from the site, especially for Sentinel who also got away with wearing a mankini in Control room A at one point.....those pictures may one day surface but for now I can't bring myself to look! The History Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames in Battersea, South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s and first operated in 1933, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s operating first in 1953. Both stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. It is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in it's Heritage at Risk Register. Since the station's closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. In July 2012, the power station was sold to a consortium led by Malaysia’s SP Setia for £400 million. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 began in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17. The Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Thanks for looking
×