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Found 35 results

  1. Much like everyone else Ive been itching to get in here for a very long time, Well an opportunity presented itself so I though hey why not, lets get down there! A selection of my pics from the night in Question A nice bit of Original Graff And looking up into a vent shaft Ill admit I was disappointed with my pics from the night, was all a bit rushed and as it seems to be of late way too many people about! Thanks for looking
  2. Another one of those that I've been wanting to do for years, It became common knowledge as to where the entrance was and after a tip off I thought it was high time I paid this last section a visit ! A little history about the Ramsgate ARP tunnel network; The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. And some of my pics from the visit On the 24th August 1940 Ramsgate received more than 500 bombs when a squadron of German aircraft were approaching Manston. Their leading aircraft was shot down over the harbour and in vengeance they decided to release their bombs over Ramsgate. This was the first air raid by the Germans on an unprotected town. On that fateful occasion countless lives were saved by an underground Air Raid Protection (A.R.P.) system of tunnels dug for the purpose. These tunnels extended for approximately 2½ miles around the town with 11 entrances at strategic points providing refuge within 5 minutes walk of most areas. A 1500 yard long former railway tunnel was also used and linked to the A.R.P. system. The tunnels were equipped with chemical toilets, bunk beds, seating, lighting and a loud speaker system. Many people took up residence below ground having lost their homes above. Others used them just for shelter or to move around town during a raid. And finally a nice bit of original Graff that I spotted despite running around muttering expletives like a loon A fantastic night had by all, thanks for checking out my Pics !
  3. Well finally onto our last explore of the night last night, myself, woody and two others went on to do this one, after a long day and night exploring this was 4th on our list for the day/night, been wanting too see this section for a long time so to finally see it made us more than happy and we all came out with a big smile on our faces, apart from the chalk grafitti its very nice down there and harldy any litter etc. bit wet in places but thats to be expected with all the rain we've had the last few months. i wont bore you with the info as theirs so much of it about and been posted before but heres a few pics i took and i hope they show just what a lovely place it is :-).
  4. Visited this place about three times back in 2010,Never have been happy with these pics but in my defence i was very very drunk most the time so they are what they are.. Fast forward 3 and a half years and i was back down here.Saw a report go up on this last year and after a while we went to pop the lid and have another look round,the lid refused to lift more than a few inches so after a couple of attempts and feeling a bit puzzled we left it . Recently pics have been appearing on Failbook so we assumed the alternative access point had been used! On getting in my first port of call was the far end to see why that cover wouldn't lift,Seems some BELLEND had tied rope under the cover and onto the ladder inside which would account for it not lifting,Ropes still on the floor and in one of my pics.. Brief info.. The cannon rd section lays in between the westcliff and the main section (train tunnel)..access into the main section is stopped by about a 25m long stretch of roof fall and at the westcliff end by a sewer pipe cutting it off and running into the westcliff section and up what would have been the ellington section now after a 30 odd foot crawl totally consuming the tunnel itself... visited with Spaceinvader,Obscurity,STeALtH and his missus.. pics in no real order Note the rope on floor which had been tied under the cover one of a chalk shaft.. Sorry about the fisheye overkill the wangle is bust and in shop
  5. The Cannon Rd section of Ramsgate tunnels, nice night out with Fortknox0 and Gadget, in by midnight, out by 6.30, in the shower, eat some food and off to work ;D. Cheers for looking peeps , Frosty.
  6. Something else I have been waiting an absolute eternity to do, but was finally given the opportunity so seized it with both hands, Visited with Non member Dan H, A bit of History borrowed again from a highly respect site: The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route. The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels. Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system with manhole covers (still visible) in the roads above. There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty. There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. The Very Famous "Please Refrain From Spitting" Sign Stenciled onto the wall And Finally one of me messing around Thats all folks, thanks for taking the time to view my pics
  7. Wevs??? You OK mate?? Oh, hang on, it says "Teenager" http://www.kentonline.co.uk/thanet_extra/news/Teen-airlifted-to-hospital-after-2482/
  8. There is an excessive amount of pipe porn in this report and some mild HDR ..the external shots have been spruced up to convey the full horror of the weather ! Well…the weather..the pigeons and the infamous metal recyclers were going to be against us today..after a rather silly way of getting in (yep should have hopped over the front gate!) we had a good mooch about this place. A lot of the machinery has been stripped out but there are the occasional bits still in place. Pigeons have taken over! Views from the roof would have been amazing if the dam sky had been blue, as it was the overcast dull grey sky did kind of put a cramp in the day…especially after the big ladder climb onto the roof ! The Rank Hovis Flour Mill was built in 1865 and was designed by Edward Welby Pugin. It closed in 2005. The mill survived two world wars, but sustained heavy bombing during World War 2. There are actually air raid tunnels underneath the site. who broke the window first pipe porn shot.. if only this would have started ! I dare you to enter the bin ! in the top of the silo.. a little more pipe porn for ya ! over the edge.. on top of the silos a little bit of blue pipe porn through the square window.. the big red machine ye olde mill convey me to the roof.. up and down the wooden stairs we climbed Well that's it..would love to go back on a nice sunny day to get some more pics of the view from the silo towers and roof !
  9. Hi all have been wanting to get in to the Ramsgate Tunnels for a very long time now so when Space Invader tipped me off that I should get my backside down there I did just that , So now for a little history about this amazing network of ARP's courtesy of the Ramsgate History forum. The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. More to Be had Here http://www.ramsgatehistory.com/forum/in ... opic=311.0 And now for a few of my pics taken over two Visits, The first with Maverick and the Second With Dan H Dan Doing His Thing Thats All Folks, Thanks for Viewing
  10. I'm lacking transport at the moment, so I decided to take a walk and have a revisit of my most familiar UE haunt. Sadly the place has gone downhill fast - it was sealed recently, but they left it a bit late... Once upon a time the site was in great condition, but has sadly become a victim of its popularity with local kids. The building is still sealed up well - so after a comedy entrance, I was inside. You could hear a pin drop - even though it was pitch dark, it was reassuring to know I would not have any unwanted company, after seeing how well the place is secured. I remember, months ago my girlfriend and I had a nasty shock while on the roof - hearing an angle grinder start up, before an awkward encounter with the culprits downstairs... There has been a mill on this site for roughly 150 years, with the large silo structures built considerably later. As I recall, the site ceased operation around 2005 due to modernization. The site is now in development hell (the plan was to convert the Grade II listed building into apartments) - the buyer paid too much and couldn't make a profit, and left the whole site unguarded for years. Anyway, as it was a good night for it, half the photographs are taken from the roof. The other half were taken while I tried not to fall through rotten floorboards... Thanks for looking!
  11. There has been scaffolding up here for quite some time, and it was obvious some brilliant views could be had from the top! So I set out one cold December night, found my way to bottom of the ladder, and began climbing. There was a PIR about 20 feet up, which turned out not to be connected to anything - so I carried on until I reached the turreted roof. It was a great spot to sit (when out of view) and enjoy the unique views! The church is opposite a monastery - here's a snippet of history quoted from pugin.com: "This is a Grade 1 listed building of as much historic value as The Grange next door. Despite having a private chapel in his house, Pugin built St. Augustine's for himself. It was begun in 1844, Pugin made only one plan for the building and this was where the foundations should be. From then on it grew out of a passion for the endeavour. The construction ceased from time to time since funds frequently ran out and Pugin would only use the best materials. He had stone bought from Whitby, as well as using local flint. The church was not finished at Pugin's death and the outside wall next to the road was only at waist height and approximately ten foot long. However this was completed by his eldest son Edward who was also an architect." Enjoy the photographs! Thanks for looking!
  12. Visited with UrbanGinger,Obscurity NutUE,Stealth and Jayne This is my second visit to this location ,My first I was a noob to photography and did not own a tripod so as expected the pictures where far from good.Even my History was way off! Fast forward 2 years or more and ive finally got around to doing the place again. Brief history, The Ramsgate Tunnels as they stand today consist of Three Doable parts, The Main section Cannon road section The Westcliff section The main section was cut off from the cannon rd section sometime in the 50�s when an over head water main had leaked causing a massive roof fall. The Cannon rd section was cut off from the Westcliff section in 1954 I believe, when a trunk sewer was constructed utilising the existing tunnels Cutting off access into the Wescliff section and destroying the Ellington section. This is probably in my opinion the nicest and apart from the odd chalk name the less molested of the three I�ve visited. On with pics taken with way too many people wandering about with torches.. A nice revisit and worth the effort
  13. This was another one of those explores for me that had fond memories attached to it, This place was most recently used as a Motor Museum which was closed back in 2006, In my child hood my Gran used to take me here from time to time the place still smels exactly as it did back then, funny how old oil lingers for ever !, History more than covered by Wevsky In his Report viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1959 Visited with Space Invader, Morgan, Obscurity & Vickie, So on with the Pics ! Good Explore this, Shame its all buttoned up tight again !
  14. visited with morgan ... the West Cliff Concert Hall, once the venue for top artists which included the Rolling Stones who played here in the early 1960’s. More recently it was the home of Ramsgate Motor Museum, Before the West Cliff Hall was constructed in 1914, the site was an Italian Garden, complete with a bandstand. To make room for the new hall, the Windmill Parade chalk was literally dug out by hand. If you look towards the cliff edge you’ll see some stone balustrades protruding onto the promenade. These marked the entrance to underground public toilets which still exist below the asphalt.Across the road is the Churchill Tavern. Formerly this was the site of the Isabella or Kent baths which were built in 1817. In 1862 new baths were built in the cliff face across the road and were known as Royal Paragon Baths. All remaining signs of the Paragon Baths disappeared following a cliff collapse... on with the pics... Royal paragon baths ... Thanks for looking
  15. Now I know you’re probably thinking. Another rambling Wevsky intro.Well im not going to disappoint chaps. This building as it’s in my home town and as a child was just up the road. Shame on you mum and dad for never taking me here as a child. Since I became interested in UE it’s been something I have wanted to visit even though I knew it was stripped bare from its closure in 2006 as I’d seen some pics a friend took early last year when he found his way in, despite that I still wanted a look inside this building I must have wandered past several thousand times since I was old enough to venture out on my own. So it’s been on the list but I’ve never actually put the effort into getting in here up until now and im so glad I did..it has the still semi intact bath’s/toilets which has its original staircase leading up to the now capped off entrance along the promanade,not every ones cup of tea old loo’s etc but the tiling is all original! Enough from me, here’s some brief History and some snaps from back in the day.. Visited with Obscurity and Mrs Obs The West Cliff Hall was opened in 1914 as a theatre, concert hall and promenade venue, staging outdoor plays in the garden amphitheatre with indoor weather cover . The West Cliff Hall and Gardens was one of three indoor/outdoor performance spaces constructed into the cliffs of South East England prior to World War 1 including the Winter Gardens in Margate and Leas Cliff Hall in Folkestone. However, the West Cliff Hall and Gardens is the only site to retain its garden and so keeps its indoor/outdoor performance capabilities making it a unique piece of South East England’s heritage. The building has been empty since closure of the Ramsgate Motor Museum in 2006,in its previous life as a concert hall amongst others the Rolling stones played here back in 1973 I believe! It has a 600 Square metre terrace which over looks the Port and is the only cliff top hall left in the country. That being said its left rotting at the moment even though there are plans by some actress to open it all back up again as a entertainment venue! Some old pics A modern view Now inside One of the booths under a balcony Main reception area Very empty and a bugger to light Now some shots some people may overlook of the old baths and toilets Staircase leading up to the old promenade entrance Old signage, well part of it And finally one from the terrace Thanks for looking
  16. Right guys i allmost feel not worthy to post this in the "high"stuff section,But it is a roof top and any one of you who knows me or has waffled to me on chat or fb will realise i suffer that vertigo fear of edges thing. That said i have been up MM roof but that was a nice enclosed staircase,this was a different matter shonky steep angled ladder/staircase right out there on the edge of the building where the small metal meshed platform that had been there a long time was less than stable looking in my mind.Big shout to Space Invader for getting me up there and giving me that little push needed to get me to do it on my 2nd attempt.. Not great views but im told it's the highest point in ramsgate.... A few pics from what turned out to be ..not as bad as i thought Thanks to SI for getting me up there!
  17. I had been eyeing this crane for a while - it has been there for roughly a month or two, and recently I decided - why not have a crack at it?! It is very small as tower cranes go, but this isn't London, so we don't get many down here. This was my first crane and I loved it! After the initial fear had worn off I felt quite relaxed (luckily there was no wind!). Some dodgy moments as I watched the occasional police car drive past down below - or a few random drunks! This was a spur of the moment thing, so I went alone at about midnight. Apologies for some of the pictures, hopefully I can do better if I visit a crane again! At this point I contemplated climbing the further 30 odd feet to where the red light is (any crane buffs know what this part is called?) - after finding the ladder was actually quite stable, unlike the various walkways I ventured up. I felt a lot more exposed up here as I didn't have as much cover, and I was illuminated by the aircraft warning light! And a self portrait to conclude the photographs! Thanks for viewing!
  18. Being right on are door step and hearing of plans to try and open them to the public we decided a local explore was in order ... visited with wevsky obscurity and frosty .. a little history.. The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route.The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels.Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. on with the pics... THE WESTCLIFF SECTION visited with obscurity ... The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system.There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty.There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. thanks for looking
  19. Maniac i know i posted this section once before and by all means delete that thread ,that was very early days of owning a dslr..so naff I did a revisit recently with my first real underground try out with the d90. The entrance all us explorers used was finally sealed months back but as ever ways in have been found. So myself Space invader obscurity and frosty decided to have one more look down here before feasibility studies are carried out after a national lottery funding of£56,000 gets underway..there's a huge amount of history out there on the main section i could spout many of the facts myself as its been in my life since 1984 but ill opt for a link and let the pictures of the areas we covered do the rest http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnel_Railway On with some photographs in no particular order as we split up so as not to get in each other's way!! Looking down towards the south portal from where the side entrance into the ww2 spur is Looking back the other way towards the northern portal Looking at the blockage at boundry road park area heading towards the cannon road section ,approx 25 yard stretch of downfall caused by a burst water main over head in the 1950's...good luck digging that out boys Concrete lined section just before the blockage leading towards the semi blocked stairs going up to boundry road park! Passage leading to the stairs going up Chalk passage leading along from main tunnel One of the concrete lined areas Stairs leading up to arklow square chalked lined section leading back towards main tunnel Sealed entrance to marine esplanade which leads into what we all know as the dome and the stairs going up to the Victoria parade entrance next to the Granville theatre Water tank i do believe original tunnel signage Actual entrance into the ww2 spur Puch maxi breaking for spares anyone! Entrance to stairs leading to dumpton park drive entrance(couldn't face the many steps up) Spur leading to the scenic railway going up to the old hereson road station Actual re backfill and sealed up properly entrance. Now considering this is in the middle of the track I'm not sure of its purpose as it must have been a later addition after main line closed..there's a big round metal vent looking pipe running from the top away to the right??! One last shot looking towards the blocked north portal entrance ..sorry if i went on a little i really thought id posted this before but to be honest glad i didn't as the pictures are coming along a bit now
  20. The Ramsgate Flour Mill was built in 1865, and closed in 2005 when the site was sold by Rank Hovis to a private developer, as it was no longer commercially viable. The mills became Grade II listed in 1988 The Ramsgate Flour Mill was built in 1865, and closed in 2005 when the site was sold by Rank Hovis to a private developer, as it was no longer commercially viable. The mills became Grade II listed in 1988 The Mills in 1900 Explored with Skeleton Key, Priority 7 and Tstranger Thanks for looking
  21. one of my first explores and defintley a place i will never get bored of visiting ... visited with wevsky and paulk a litte history The Ramsgate Flour Mill was built in 1865, and closed in 2005 when the site was sold by Rank Hovis to a private developer, as it was no longer commercially viable. It is situated next to the site of the old Ramsgate Town Station, which has long been demolished and is now a block of flats The mill survived two world wars, but sustained heavy bombing during World War 2. As the threat of war came nearer, air raid tunnels were dug. One “for the men� was dug under the old railway cattle pens (to the rear of the site), which gave the shelter about 25 feet of chalk and concrete as protection.For the office workers, a separate shelter was constructed, which was a brick lined tunnel dug from the general office down into the ground. Under the mill, this was made wider to give a fair size room. A way out was up two long flights of concrete steps ... a few from the roof ... silo the office workers shelter thanks for looking
  22. For years a forgotten system of passages and tunnels are rumored to have been left disused under Ramsgate. The larger and more recognized tunnels are referred to as St.Augustines caves. Early photos show these tunnels and many entrances. The tunnels suffered after a cliff collapse causing them to become split into many small sections. These are now sealed and sit under the st. Augustine’s Abbey. Next to the abbey is Pugin’s house. This is open to the public but the tunnels aren't accessible. After speaking to the monks at the abbey we found that pugins caves were unexplored and the monks had no knowledge of if they still exist. Well, a while later we are in to unlock the secrets of Pugin’s caves. They were constructed by Pugin for the purposes of smuggling. A & C 1867:-
  23. This was my first visit to ramsgate tunnels, the place is huge should have worn my hiking boots. Thanks to Fat wreck for showing me the place and bringing lots of things that glow or burn . I must add the round balls are the work of Fat Wreck, mine look more like furballs that are not very ballish its bloody hard.
  24. This section of air raid tunnels is only 1 section of the Ramsgate Air Raid Tunnel system.It is now in 3 different parts due to blockages.Having recently got a whisper that this section was now doable we siezed the moment,I would of had better quality photos,but the visit was cut short by 2 rather friendly patroling Community Support Officers
  25. Right this isnt a ground breaking new and interesting report its a very well visited place..Im posting this short report as i finally have had chance with my tripod and dslr to get underground,ive visited this spot more times than i care to remember mainly in the 80's but recently using my trusty nokia camera fone this is just to show ive come a fair way since then and finally with recently arrived tripod got out to take some better pics,long exposure and for convinience some with flash and freehand as i wanted to show my mate around before i got started with tripod! a few long exposures The rest was taken on a tour round the tunnels as my mates 1st trip ,before i got me tripod out for pics above Right sorry its the same old over visited main tunnel but was itching to try out my tripod underground and do some light painting..im hooked guys:)
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