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Found 49 results

  1. This ones been long in the planning, but eventually at some ungodly hour of the morning me and Brewtal managed to get inside and see the place for ourselves. It was a pretty brief visit by all accounts, but we managed to see most of the lower level. History Built as part of the now demolished Melville Barracks in Chatham. This deep shelter was a refuge for the marines at the barracks. The history is pretty vague, but I believe the tunnels existed before the start of WW2. In the early 1960s when the melville Barracks were demolished to make way for the council offices, and most of the tunnel entrances were sealed up. The Explore After a few weeks of planning me and Brewtal finally got round to visiting here. This one requires a little more caution as the entrance method is somewhat brazen. After a bit of head scratching we devised a plan and went for it. We were in! I'd be forewarned about the stairs, and everything said was absolutely right!. The wooden stairs are very rotten and very dangerous. Even when taking extra care, we had a few brown pants moments. Once at the bottom of the lower level we could relax and start exploring. The lower level is quite extensive and we saw as much as we could. Unfortunately we were fairly time limited, so we didn't mess around too much. I found the stairs going up to the upper levels, but decided against it this time. Re-visit for that one me thinks. It was refreshing to see no graffiti or vandalism. The access situation has protected it pretty well I suspect. Photos The bottom of the stairs. These were supposed to be the 'Ok' stairs. Dread to think what the 'bad' stairs were like. The stairs to the upper levels.
  2. Opening in 1902, the Theatre Royal in Hyde was a replacement for an older theatre nearby of the same name. The theatre was built by S. Robinson and Sons of Hyde to the design of Campbell and Horsley of Manchester and could seat 1400 people. Two balconies curve round to meet the proscenium, the stage area was large and included a host of dressing rooms to one side. In 1914 a movable screen was added onto the stage to enable the theatre to operate as a part-time cinema. The popularity of live performances declined in the 1970s so the decision was made to convert the theatre to cinema-only use. In 1972 the main auditorium was used as a full-time cinema screen, with the stage area being converted into a second screen. The cinema closed in the 1990s when the London-based owners uncovered fraudulent activity taking place there. They considered the theatre a liability and the final film was shown in August 1993, despite being full. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  3. Evening all I won't bother with the history, as i'm sure everything knows it by now! I've been up to my usual antics, taking trips down here on the regular, these particular images were from 2 visits. Once with MrObvious & a non-member where we were lucky enough to see the morgue, and another with loocyloo and whynotdie, which was probably one of my most intense trips there. It was another stupidly early morning(thanks to loocyloo for the lift:D) but soon enough we were on site and walking towards access. Seeing as it was pitch black & i knew the route, we decided to keep the torches off. I took the lead, and silently we walked between buildings and under trees until all of a sudden i froze. Run, run i shouted as I was greeted by a dark figure about 6 foot in front of me, who then decided to blind with strobe mode on his torch. We made the immediate 180 and ran for it, mr security man in tow, diving through bushes and over an absolute pain in the arse wall. we were in the clear - or so we thought. We gave it a little bit before going back over the wall, seeing as it was right by the access point. I was first over so i grabbed the bags. I glanced round, and mr security man was stood there, watching me about 15 foot away. He bolted at me, so lumbered up with 3 bags and a tripod i made a break for it. We played cat and mouse for what seemed like forever, before i bailed over the fence. I had no way of contacting the others, so made the walk round to the front gate in search for the others, where I happened to bump into a not-so-happy Brian, the site manager. After a bit of a bollocking we parted ways, and after meeting up with the other 2 we buggered off for a well deserved maccies. Obviously we weren't gonna give up there, so after a grim breakfast and a cuppa tea we were back on our way. We got straight in this time, and after a good few hours inside we were hungry and tired. and who wants to go over a fence when you're hungry and tired? Yeah, not us.. out the front gate we went, only to be greeted by an even angrier Brian. After giving us the "ive already spoke to you this morning" lecture we decided to walk out, but good ol' Bri decided to follow us in an attempt to get the car registration, but we took him on a nice little stroll of the area and eventually he went to whatever he was doing.. which clearly wasn't guarding the site very well;) If you're still here, thanks for looking!
  4. Royal Hospital Haslar Oct 15

    a quick walk around inside the notorious Royal Hospital Haslar in the night. History you probably all know by now The Visit Ive been to this location so many times now, nothing interesting actually happened, just wanted to get some footage inside before its completely gone, because i heard theyre starting to strip the place now
  5. History The Royal Hospital Haslar, completed in 1762, was built to provide a dedicated military hospital for the Royal Navy. Set in over 60 acres of beautiful parkland, with many Georgian Grade II listed buildings and a prime seafront location, Haslar has a long tradition of delivering care and well-being to its residents. In November 2009 the Ministry of Defence (MoD) sold the site to OurEnterprise, a company dedicated to a community-led regeneration.Today the Royal Haslar site extends to approximately 62 acres of land and comprises approximately 75,000 square meters of buildings. Eighteen buildings on the site are either Grade II or II* listed. The Visit After waking up at 2am me and Loocyloo set off to fetch TheVampiricSquid we tried popping into maccies on the way down but it wasn’t late enough for breakfast so after our first attempt of entrance we got chased around the site for 20minutes after hiding for 10min TheVampiricSquid jumped back over the wall so we could have another crack at it as loocyloo was halfway over all we heard was him say get back down as he sprinted away with 3 bags and 3 tripods We camped out for 30min waiting for him to return but nothing! He had all of our stuff including phones so we thought we would head towards the main entrance to see if he had been caught he had! So we bailed and went for a actually maccies breakfast this time which was a mind fuck having dinner hours before having breakfast!!!! Our second attempt later on that morning was a lot more successful after playing on the ropes in the gym and trying to get the perfect shot of the spiral staircase before we knew it we had been in there 4/5 hours! So we made our exit just to be greeted by the same guard! As he tried to get us back in his office we made our way around him and he “called the police†so he started following us after clearly shouting to his mate “im going to get there car registration†we certainly wasn’t heading back to the car so we took him for a nice walk around the local streets until he realized it was highly pointless him following us! Anywhore sorry for the long story here’s the pics! Enjoy! The pics!
  6. Evening all, hope everyones feeling funky fresh and all that jazz, took a little tour down south last weekend, chased a couple of new leads which unfortunately both turned up fails, the first was a an attempt on the lovely old 1930s fire station in my home town and the the second was an interesting place ill chuck up in leads n rumours as its too far away for me to keep an eye on, anyway lets see what ive got to say about about haslaaaaar! The Explore. Explored with badge and a local non member explorer. So it was another early one, muchos coffee would be required so thank god for 24 hr garages- "can i have a large flat white mate", "we don't do large flat whites", "fine can i have two flat whites mate"-problem solved, even though i only had time to drink one, forgot about the other and downed it stone cold when we got back to the car. It had been light about 1/2 hour by the time we got in, we aimed for dark but we all know what time it gets light atm and it's not a fun time to be getting up! Once inside first thing we came to was the ct scanner after then i went for a wander whilst the other two took some pics and found a nicely geared up lab, pretty mental actually, so i'm in there in the lab with my tripod-fuck snakes, the head on my ball mount is well lose, massive hairy ballbags, ok where are allans keys? obviously they are in my toolbox, needless to say i didn't come exploring loaded out with my fatmax tool box, oh my- what an absolute shitbag, got to spend all day taking shots on a wonky tripod-great, instinctively glanced around, as you do, not realistically thinking i'm going to find anything useful but instinctively glancing around all the same, you know how it is you've got a problem, have a look around for a solution, or at least something you might be able to bodge into a temporary solution, low and behold, less than a foot away from me and what's on the side? a lonely flipping allen key - obviously in my head i'm saying 'pffft naaah not a chance, there's no way that's gonna fit, no one in the entire history of the world is that bloody lucky, sod it worth a try', pick up the allen key, slot him in the screw head- boom, shake shake the bloody room a perfect fit! asbofruitly bangerang, ask and ye shall receive!! sorry that particular waffle went on a slightly bit longer than i intended but it was bloody mental and it did blow my mind a bit! so after picking up the pieces and putting my blown mind back together we had a wander around a couple of operating theatres and one of the wards, no beds in the ward but still has all the lamps, think then we headed down and came across the main through gate to the courtyard, the place with the arches and the old tracks running through. Whilst the other two got there shots i wandered off on my todd for 20 mins/half an hour and had a mooch around the basement, got a habit of wandering off, kinda miss exploring solo sometimes, nice to wander freely about and not wait to take shots or tell jane to get the funk out of the way every two minutes! I bumped back into the other two some time later by the rather well known curvy stairs, very photogenic staircase, wish i had got a few more angles tbf but as i say three of us taking shots of the same thing i got bored pretty quickly waiting around, patience is most definitely not a virtue of this particular explorer . After a bit more mooching about we ended up on the roof, could see a tradesman working on one of the out buildings and saw a high vis jacket wondering around so hid behind the upstand of a gable for 10/15 mins before glancing over the top , grabbing a couple of shots and heading back in. cant really remember where we headed next, but at one point we were in the gym and jane threw herself off the rope she was swinging on onto the floor as she had just caught site of the rozzers rolling past so again we bailed up on the roof and hid out for another 10/15 mins. We had been hearing footsteps most the morning, everyone i had spoke to about haslar prior to going had said, you're gona get caught eventually, its just a matter of how long you get in there before you do. Once we were about done with the main building it was coming on for 10 so we decided to bail out and try the water tower and the morgue, both well out in the open so the rumble-ometer was definitely in the red and low and behold, we got rumbled, not too disappointed though, we had had a good 5/6 hours in there so chalked up as a success. The secca was nice as pie, thought he was going to try and sell us some double glazing the size of the smile he had on his face as we approached him, we tried asking to see the morgue, nice as he was he poo-pooed that idea and so i told him to go stick the kettle on and have himself a little break now that he had found us and with that we left without a fuss. Bloody good morning all in. I really enjoyed this place as my uncle lives in gosport, was a navy man and also used to volunteer at haslar when it was operational so was cool to walk the same floors as he used to and looking forward to showing him some pics of the place as it is now. Lil bit of cheeky copy n paste history courtesy of the bbc. Since 1753, The Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport has provided medical care to the service personnel of the Royal Navy, and latterly, to the Army and RAF, and, in more recent years, civilians, too. The building of the hospital took 16 years and planning permission for it was first granted in 1745 by King George II, when the land was purchased. Originally, a fourth side to the hospital’s three-sided 'U' shaped layout was planned, and was to include a chapel, but due to over-spending on the project, work on it never began. "The biggest hospital in Europe!" Even so, during the building of the hospital, one of the first Physicians of Haslar (the person who ran the hospital), Dr James Lind, described the hospital as "an immense pile of a building and when complete it will certainly be the biggest hospital in Europe!" As a compromise to the scrapped fourth side, a separate church was built in 1762 for staff, their families and patients. But the hospital was already operational long before its completion – by 1753, some nine years prior to building work ending in 1762, would-be patients were bedding down in the builder's living quarters, aware that the new hospital would soon be open. With the hospital still only half-built at this stage, and the need for more space to care for sick sailors in the area becoming increasingly desperate, patients were admitted into the completed areas of the hospital from October 1753. There is no formal record of an official opening of the hospital. But Haslar frequently saw full wards, and over the decades would gain a reputation as an excellent example of military nursing care. Casualties from all major wars were treated at Haslar. The sick and injured servicemen from Trafalgar, Corunna, Waterloo, and Army casualities from the Crimean, as well as the two World Wars of the 20th Century, and the Falklands, were all cared for at Haslar. Haslar hospital, from the front Haslar hospital opened in 1753 In the first decades or so of the 1800s - the years of the Trafalgar, Corunna and Waterloo battles - many of Haslar's patients who died were laid to rest in the grounds. Its said that buried in the paddock to the south-west of the hospital are tens of thousands of servicemen, and is thought to be the densest area of burial in the UK of those who died serving their country. When Haslar first opened, some compared it to a prison. There were overcrowded buildings, discharged patients taking up home in the attics and reports of drunkenness and petty theft among staff and patients. Late 18th Century Navy inspections resulted in improved conditions, when a Naval Captain was appointed as the hospital's first governor in 1795. The management of the hospital was primarily by Naval Officers rather than by doctors, until the early 20th Century. 20th Century Haslar During World War I, the hospital was full, and during World War II, the threat of air raids meant Haslar primarily treated emergencies who were then transferred to inland hospitals once the patient was out of immediate danger. In 1941, two bombs hit the hospital. Naval recruits The hospital was originally Naval only Management of the hospital went over to doctors - Haslar was now under the leadership of a Medical Officer in Charge. In 1954 the word 'Naval' was formally included in the title of the hospital, becoming Royal Naval Hospital Haslar. A tri-service hospital 'Naval' was removed in 1966 when it became a tri-service hospital (ie Navy, Army and RAF), serving the families of service personnel as well as the local population in the Gosport area, a role it continued with until now. The military medical care carried out at Haslar now transfers to a new Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit in Portsmouth, and the 200 or so service personnel currently based at Haslar will remain there until 2009, working alongside NHS colleagues carrying out NHS work. In 2009, the hospital will close its doors for the final time. Although military medicine continues in the area, with Haslar's closure will go over 250 years of military medical history. Picturegraphs-quite pic heavy as its a big ol place and all that, had about 35 in my shortlist when i went through them but whittled it down a little! thanks for looking and have a happy haslar day kids !!
  7. Hi all, First post on this forum, start off with something simple. The DRI, alot of people have visited this place and it caused alot of drama, but it was on my list for a while. Some history for you. Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI) was established in 1810 on land formerly part of Derby's Castlefield estate on land near what is now Bradshaw Way and the A6 London Road. It was known as the Derbyshire General Infirmary at the time. In 1890 a Typhoid outbreak sweeped through the hospital, and the buildings design was blamed. The hospital is entirely demolished, a year later Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone of what would become Derbyshire Royal Infirmary. The neo-Jacobean building was completed in 1894, and its main features were its 'Onion' shaped domed towers and its central corridor which ran the length of the hospital. The hospital was expanded at several points in the 20th century, the most visible being the still used Wilderslowe Tower and the now disused A+E building built in 1970. The DRI as a result is an architectural mish-mash with the original hospital at its heart. Buildings aside, the DRI was a pioneering hospital, the UK's first Flying Squad was set up here in 1955, in 1976 George Cohrane set up the first National Demonstration Centre for Rehabilitation and in 1992 the Pulvertaft Hand Centre was opened by the Queen, her grandson William was sent here seven years later following a rugby injury. In the late 90s, the NHS Trust's for each hospital in Derby merged, and drew up a dramatic plan to consolidate the services of both hospital's on one site. The so called 'super hospital', soon to be known as the Derby Royal Hospital is one of the largest in the region. There are no official plans to redevelop the now redundant Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, the land is covered by a large regeneration plan which will expand Derby's city centre southwards into what is known as Castleward. The 1987 built part of the hospital shall continue to provide medical care, providing the services of the closed Aston Hall and Grove Hospital's south of Derby. The vist. I've wanted to get into this place for months, with many attempts and fails. But I finally managed to get in. I soon became aware of the pure amount of workers on site demolishing many of the out buildings slowly but surely. I stayed in one of the first buildings, I'm not sure which part of the hospital this was, be great if someone could tell me? But I enjoyed the look around. 4 Floors and each have their own character and story. It's just such a shame a big beautiful place has to be knocked down for something completely useless. Onwards and upwards I suppose. Hope you enjoy. http://i1300.photobucket.com/albums/ag89/arron13/IMG_2402_zpszbbmtji5.jpg' alt='IMG_2402_zpszbbmtji5.jpg'> Thanks for looking:cool:
  8. Hey Guys, i'm back again:D Visited this place with SlimJim a little while back, although i've only just got round to uploading! History..The Haslar site was bought in 1745. It is a glorious 55-acre site overlooking the mouth of Portsmouth harbor, and it became the first purpose-built hospital for the Royal Navy. It was opened in 1754 and took some 1,800 patients. Its distinctive high walls were there to prevent the patients from escaping should they wish to do so, having been press-ganged into the Navy initially. It is historically very interesting. The expression "up the creek" refers to Haslar creek, which is not a good place to be. It was for years the main home of the Royal Naval Medical Service, but following changes it eventually became the only military hospital in the United Kingdom, and was renamed the Royal Hospital Haslar. That was the position on 10 December 1998. On that date, the Government announced they were proposing that the military forces withdraw from Haslar, and it was stated that the hospital would close in about two years. In fact, some 10 years later the Royal Hospital Haslar [was] still there. Borrowed from Urbexbandoned:D Slightly behind scheduled and in sub-zero temperatures we arrived around 7:00am, with dawn already beginning to break we were against the clock - but one benefit is we got a cracking sun rise! After the usual jumping fences/walls and fighting through brambles we found ourselves inside - but it was the catering building. We snapped our pictures and decided to move on.. unfortunately the only way to the main building was across the walkway.. and yup that was sealed tight! If you can't go through it, go over it right? We clambered around and found ourselves on the roof of the walkway, just as we got over I thought we were in.. until I peeked over the wall and guess who's standing there? Only Mr. Secca Guard. Anyhow, we still managed to get some awesome shots, so now on with the pictures!
  9. After 2 hours kip and a 2 AM start we set off on the 4 hour trip down to Gosport to revisit this epic place. Our first visit mainly consisted of getting lost and getting caught by security so with a better plan this time we managed to spend most of the day in there leaving no room untouched in search of the machine's left behind, some of which were in darkness so some may be poorly lit. I couldn't decide which pictures to choose so this post might be rather pic heavy sorry bout that Visited with Fat Panda and 2 non members thanks for looking
  10. Just have a couple of photos to share from our trip to Haslar. There are quite a lot of pics but i hope you all enjoy and please leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks
  11. firstly thanks for taking the time to have a look at my report (its my first one so go easy lol) history stolen from wiki The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746 and 1761. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital – and the largest brick building – in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716–1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since started to be redeveloped. The site[edit] Water tower on the site In 2001 Haslar was designated a Grade II listed historic park. Several of the buildings are listed. On 17 May 2010 an investigation of the hospital's burial ground, by archaeologists from Cranfield Forensic Institute, was featured on Channel 4's television programme Time Team. It was estimated that up to 7,785 individuals had been buried there, although other estimates say there could be anything up to 20,000. From 1758 the chief surgeon was James Lind, who previously, though unwittingly, had discovered the cure for scurvy. Lind's pioneering work on infection control considerably reduced mortality rates. Archaeological investigations showed evidence of scurvy and revealed that limb amputations had been commonplace. The last military-run ward[edit] The last military-run ward was ward E5, a planned orthopaedic surgery ward. The ward encompassed 21 beds in small 'rooms', and was run by the military staff with some NHS colleagues; the ward manager was a serving military officer. The ward was served by both military and NHS doctors; the ancillary staff were non-military. The ward closed in 2009 along with the rest of the site and military staff moved to new posts within MDHU Portsmouth or other units around the country. March out[edit] To mark the handover of control to the civilian NHS trust, the military medical staff marched out of RH Haslar in 2007, exercising the unit's rights of the freedom of Gosport.[1] The staff consisted of Royal Air Force, Royal Navy and Army led by a band of the Royal Marines. The Gosport citizens are said to deeply saddened by the closure of Haslar and there are campaigns to keep the hospital open. Gosport politicians cite that the UK is the only country in the Western world not to have a dedicated Military hospital, run by and for its military staff – who understand the needs and ideology of the service person. At present, most casualties from conflicts return to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham for treatment at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine. 20141123165725_IMG_6633 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123144848_IMG_6629 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123123243_IMG_6617 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123144222_IMG_6628 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123122654_IMG_6615 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123143624_IMG_6625 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123122314_IMG_6614 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123120737_IMG_6608 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123121510_IMG_6611 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123115808_IMG_6606 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123105915_IMG_6602 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123105235_IMG_6598 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123104115_IMG_6595 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123104604_IMG_6597 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123090805_IMG_6575 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123102417_IMG_6592_1 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr 20141123094041_IMG_6581 by peterfranck1991, on Flickr and those stairs!! Those stairs!! by peterfranck1991, on Flickr first of many reports from me thanks for looking again
  12. I visited with sentinel, extreme_ironing, overarch, and makepondsnotwar. This was my third visit here, we had a quick look for the padded cell in the psychiatric block but it wasn't accessible so we made our way into the main complex instead. We had 5 hours inside with no hassle. The main target for me was the X-ray department which is still full of machines and equipment. It is amazing to see all this stuff left behind which must have cost a small fortune at one time. The NHS claim they kept anything of any worth and that these machines were too old to be of any use, I find that hard to believe. Here are some historical details about the hospital. The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746-61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital and the largest brick building in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716-1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785-1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services; the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001 Haslar was designated a Grade II listed historic park and several of the buildings are listed. Also in 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since meant to have started redevelopment, although there are no signs of this having taken place. The citizens of Gosport are said to deeply saddened by the closure of Haslar and there are campaigns to keep the hospital open. Gosport politicians cite that the UK is the only country in the Western world not to have a dedicated Military hospital, run by and for its military staff who understand the needs and ideology of the service person. At present, most casualties from conflicts return to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham for treatment at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine. 1. 2.At one time patients would be brought into the hospital by train along these tracks 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. X-Ray Department 14. 15. 16. 17. The insides of a scanner 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. We had a spectacular sunset to end the day Thanks for having a mooch
  13. Royal GR - 2014

    Evening all, This was a permission visit somewhere in Belgium. I'm sure you've seen some of this before around the net but in the back of beyond is this old garage. The owner's father owned a lot of the cars before him for about 60 years and this guy was knocking on himself so gives you an appreciation of how old the place was. Not sure if this is strictly urbex but there was a lot of old, historical abandoned vehicles here and it was a real pleasure to photograph them. Went slightly mad with the 50mm prime as you will see from a small selection of them below. There is a larger set on Flickr and also about another 20 to process. Thanks for looking in.
  14. visited with alanmowbs82, this set of tunnels wwas a deep refuge for the royal marines, built over two levels the lower being a sleeping and refuge area and the upper being the offices, plant and casualty clearing station for the hospital which sat at that entrance. It's a nice set of tunnels with little to no graffiti from after the second world war. Unfortunately it's damp in places which has led to a lot of the hardboard walls of the offices deteriorating but all in all a very nice set. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. thanks for looking
  15. Cheers for looking in guys
  16. I haven't been about for a while but just had a busy weekend exploring, this was the first and there will be a couple or more coming up as soon as I have the time. I used to frequent this place in the late 70s early 80s and it was a nice little pub, I've known its been empty for ages but thought it would be well locked up and never gave it a second thought. Then Friday afternoon a friend of mine came into the garage and said it was open. He was working nearby and noticed a broken window so had a quick look and took a couple of photos on his phone. As we both finished at 5 it was arranged to meet just after. (We both went back on the weekend to go down the cellar as it was short notice we only took or cameras (I managed to grab my tripod)) The metal thief's had done a good job on the floors upstairs and the kids had done a good job on the rest, but all in all there is still lots of odds and ends about. Had a busy weekend so will have a look for some history as soon as I can, one room though had been done out as the inside of a old boat (The Mary Rose) but that was since the last time I was there. On to the photos with the full set here https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/with/14214713672 Thanks for looking
  17. Two Fast Patrol Boats of the Royal Danish Navy, SØHESTEN (Sea Horse) P513 (1966-1990) and SØHUNDEN (Sea Dog) P514 (1966-1990), are floating somewhere in Belgium. Today: abandoned ...In their glory: Propulsion: 3 Rolls Royce Marine Gas Turbines - 12,750 Hps. 2 General Motors Diesel Engines - 460 Hps. 3 Propellers Speed : 54 knots (gas turbines) 10 knots (diesel engines) Armament : 1-2 ea 40 mm Machine Gun Mk M/48 LvSa (2x1) 2-4 ea 533 mm Torpedo Tubes (4x1) 2 ea Illumination Rocket Launcher (on forward gun) 10 ea mines could be carried in stead of the torpedo tubes After the mid 1980's, the aft 40 mm was permanently replaced by: 1 ea 20 mm Machine Gun Mk M/42 LvSa Complement: 27 men (5 officers and 22 ratings and enlisted) The FPB could be equipped as a torpedo boat with one forward gun and four torpedo tubes, or as a gun boat with two guns (forward and aft) and only two torpedo tubes.
  18. The DRI - a bit like the old cliché - nothing for ages then 3 come at once Its an amazing site with all sorts to see, a bit like a giant Urbex playground. On the downside you have to share it with various other types of dubious life-forms but I met some smashing fellow explorers here and had a ball! At the time I went it wasn't a place to go to if you like peace and quiet. Surely you don't want the history again, just the pics? Hopefully some stuff that's new among the more familiar... . . . . . . . .
  19. Hey, as DRI seems popular at the moment, I thought why not. Photos are from a series of visits, so things have moved, been more damaged or just changed. This is relfected in the photos, as the microscopes move every time I've been. I'll skip the histoty and say sorry in advance for the large number of photos! Enjoy!
  20. I like graffiti and ever since I saw this place I wanted to pay it a visit, it was second on my list for the day and I was alone. I parked up and found a way in, I could hear a generator and see a cabin on one side, so I went in a different direction. After about half hour I walked out of a building and straight in front of secco. He looked at me and ambled up while I walked down to him, he didn't say anything so I told him what I was doing and asked if he minded if I carried on. He asked how I got in and if there was anyone with me, I told him, he asked how long I wanted I told him and he said I could as long as I didn't go anywhere stupid. They have cleared between the buildings and he said they will be down in 3/4 weeks, so it looks like I got there in time. As I was squeezing through my exit point I was face with a couple of coppers, they asked what I had been doing and ask if I knew I was trespassing, I told them that I had spoke to the secco and they were happy. They were looking for some young kids and asked if I had seen any, when I said no they just walked back to their car. As I said, I did take some photos of the buildings but the graffiti was the main subject. full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/100221036@N06/sets/72157640154562644/ Thanks for looking
  21. First time we visited this place way back in may 2011 we where met at the fenceline by mr security,seems atleast 2 groups where inside and being chased down by secca and police with dogs and arrests where made..Needless to say after getting on site briefly we bailed cos the sound of big dogs barking was getting closer. After the recent spate of reports going up and with Obscurity's birthday explore to be had it was decided to give this another crack,Cheers to Stussy and webbly for some useful intel This day started at about 1am Myself SpaceInvader Obscurity and this time Urban Ginger headed of down to Haslar at stupid O'clock in the morning,we got inside and set about grabbing some sleep while waiting for it to get light,this was hindered by snoring farting and fone alarms going off!The decision to not smoke while in the hospital incase we alerted secca so the roof and basement was utilised for a few Joints ,after a few hours of wandering around and finding the X-ray dept it seems this golden rule got broken cos five minutes after we had left we heard noises,so we bolted up to the roof space and got some distance between us and whoever was behind us,then we found the staircase so all thoughts of who was following us kinda got forgot and we cracked on with the fisheye shots of said stairs..as i lent over to grab a shot a "oih" was to be heard and i got a guy in high viz in the shot!Turns out this was Stan (secca) and his mate Bob, who had followed the smell of smoke and knew someone was in the building!.The usual don't run was called out and conversation began,names of sorts given and as it turns out these guys where very understanding of what we was there for and had no problem so no need for further action with police,and he was decent enough to show us a few more bits we hadn't got to n the way out!So cheers Stan for being one of the good guys! On with some pics,didnt cover a huge amount of the site it is very maze like and seems we went round in circles a fair bit Format for pics::.Staircase,scanner,x-ray machine ,corridor,external etc.not in that order,so nothing you haven't seen before. Nice to get inside at last but i have to say as with every explore the poster puts up the best pics..so wasnt quite what i expected but still worth the trip
  22. After a few failed attempts over the past year. I saw online that it was becoming popular again, so I thought I would give it a try again. This time with no problems. Spent 7 hours inside here. Didn't see anyone else. We saw fresh footprints on the floor that didn't match any of our footwear, then noticed a few doors being sealed up that weren't the first time around? strange! Any way, here are my pictures. Nothing new, just the same stuff! A couple are a slight HDR but nothing eye burning! Hope you like. Founded in the reign of King George I, the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport, Hampshire, was one of several hospitals serving the Portsmouth Urban Area, but had previously been the country's foremost – and ultimately last – military hospital. Its military status was withdrawn in 2007, and those military personnel remaining joined the Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit (MDHU Portsmouth) at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, Portsmouth. In the summer of 2009, all remaining (civilian) medical services at Haslar were relocated to the Queen Alexandra Hospital, and the site was subsequently sold. The Royal Military Hospital Haslar had a number of notable specialist medical facilities, including a decompression chamber and a zymotic isolation ward. History[edit] The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746–61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital – and the largest brick building – in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716–1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since started to be redeveloped. PLEASE LOOK UP AND SEE THE TRAM LINES:^ The Haslar Tramway was constructed in 1877 as a single line running from the Haslar Jetty into the Main Arcade of the hospital. At the jetty there was an ambulance shed with a junction for the storage of the ambulance tram and a similar junction at the Arcade. The two trams were built by the London and Midland Railway. Hospital boats or cutters collected the sick, wounded or dead from the anchoring fleet at Spithead and the dockyard and ferried them to the Haslar Jetty. On arrival at the jetty the patients were landed and transferred to the ambulance. Sick Berth staff then pushed the ambulance to the Main Arcade. On arrival at the Arcade the patients were then carried to the hospital receiving room for admission. Thank You!
  23. The Royal York Hotel,a fine Art Deco style building completed in 1935 , replacing the original Victorian hotel of the same name. Closed in 2006. My guess is that it will be turnt into flats in the near future! The video tour! http://youtu.be/mKuRE1R4xvY
  24. Royal Hospital Haslar Visited with Chaos History Founded in the reign of King George I, the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport, Hampshire, was one of several hospitals serving the Portsmouth area, but had previously been the country's foremost - and ultimately last - military hospital. Its military status was withdrawn in 2007, and those military personnel remaining joined the Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit (MDHU Portsmouth) at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, Portsmouth. In the summer of 2009, all remaining (civilian) medical services at Haslar were relocated to the Queen Alexandra Hospital, and the site was subsequently sold. The Royal Military Hospital Haslar has had a number of notable specialist medical facilities, including a decompression chamber and a zymotic isolation ward. The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746-61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital - and the largest brick building - in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716-1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh PhrenologicalSociety. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services - the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 with a view to it being redeveloped in some shape or form in the future Report 4am seemed like a good idea when we finalised a plan for this jaunt....roll on a few days and I'm up in the dark, the oncoming winter's cold creeping in and its pissing it down. Not to let a chilly dark wet morning dampen the mood, We drive the hour to Gosport to have a crack at Haslar. Due to the changes to a few of the locations 'features' we were on the verge of knocking it on the head...however i'm not one to give up on a derp that easy. The sun was coming up and we were running out of ideas so with a quick chat we decided on a risky yet rewarding little mission, with a bit of a squeeze here and a squeeze there and some clever placement tekkers we were in. The site itself is on the large size, its a typical style massive hospital layout where you have no idea where your going. We followed the remaining signage and decided to check the mass of X-ray, MRI and CT scanners/machines first. I'm amazed none of this kit has been removed and given a new home, but with the rate of advance that technology is moving these days the equipment has been left behind in dark ages. We cracked on through the various buildings, wards, walkways and old operating theatres attempting to cover as much ground as possible before I needed to be back for my Sunday roast. Someone has clearly made an effort (albeit not a very good one) to put in a few cuffed security measures internally which resulted in lots of up and down stairwells and in and out of wards and admin offices to try and get from point to point, it definitely added double the amount of walking distance. We found that after we'd seen the things we came for we ended up going round in circles, with legs getting sore and belly's needing sustenance we decided to head out and home. This was a good little explore and another box ticked. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking
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