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Found 84 results

  1. History Highgate Station was constructed in 1867, by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway, in a deep cutting that was excavated from Highgate Hill. The two tunnels penetrating the hillside from either side of the station were built some years before the station itself. Highgate Station was designed so that it had two side platforms and three tracks between them. A station building was constructed to the south end of the platform, along with a covered footbridge which connected the two platforms. The entire station was rebuilt in the 1880s, and a new central platform with two tracks flanking either side was constructed. The island could be accessed via a ticket office located in the middle of the footbridge. The station was altered again in 1935, as part of the ‘Northern Heights’ project that sought to incorporate the Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace lines into the London Transport Network. The first stage of the project involved the construction of tube tunnels underneath Highgate Station. To provide an interchange between the new deep-level platforms and the existing surface platforms, a subterranean pedestrian network was built immediately beneath Highgate Station. Stairs and escalators were installed to connect the existing platforms with the new underground ones, and street entrances to the concourse were built on Archway Road and Priory Gardens. As the pedestrian footbridge was no longer required, it was demolished along with some parts of the original buildings. The remaining sections of the older buildings were redeveloped, together with the surface platforms themselves which received some minor alterations. Following World War Two, plans to improve Highgate Station were never fully completed. As other sections of London’s Railways required urgent maintenance, and were deemed more important as they were more central to the heart of the city, Highgate became less of a priority. Despite being labelled as ‘under construction’ for years on various maps, by the early 1950s passenger services at Highgate’s surface Station ceased, but freight traffic continued to pass through the station until 1964. After freight traffic ceased to operate on this section of the line, it was used only for occasional London Underground rolling stock transfers between Highgate Depot and the Northern City line; however, since it was never electrified the stock had to be pulled over the lines using battery-powered locomotives. All activity ceased on Highgate’s surface lines by 1970, due to the poor structural integrity of some of the nearby bridges. Presently, one of the original 1867 buildings still stands; this is rumoured to be used as a residential building. As for the station itself, a number of the older buildings were demolished, leaving only the 1940s structures standing. Plastic sheeting was used to cover the old track bed after the rails were removed, to prevent water from seeping into the northern lines concourse which lies below. Much of the old route between Finsbury Park and Alexandra Palace is now part of the Parkland Walk; however, this bypasses the station for health and safety reasons. Our Version of Events Getting into London by car wasn’t quite as bad as we’d imagined, but finding a spot to park was an absolute nightmare. As we toured the city for a bit, looking for somewhere to stop the car, we noticed that people seem to squeeze into any spot available; there were mere centimetres between some of them! Finally, after much searching, we found a space (thankfully) that wasn’t too far from Highgate Station. Judging by some of the cars that were parked near us, and the moss growing on their rooves, a few of them seem to have been there for a long time. Having witnessed this, we think we now understand, a bit more clearly, why there’s such a parking problem in London. Since we’d heard the station was situated in a hillside and surrounded by trees, we imagined finding it would be a bit of a challenge. As it turned out, however, we were wrong – it’s very visible. Gaining access wasn’t difficult either, which we were also surprised about given that there’s a busy station next door; we had gauged that it might be difficult to slip onto the old premises without being seen with such a high volume of people around. Once again we were mistaken in our assumption, as no one seemed to give a shit that we looked slightly suspicious milling around an abandoned site with tripods and cameras, meaning we were able to wander into the station very easily. Once onsite, even though people could probably see us quite clearly from the live station and a public footpath which runs alongside the platform, no one glanced our way; instead, everyone seemed more intent on rushing to wherever it was they were going. After a quick wander around the site it was obvious that there isn’t much there, and all of the tunnel portals are sealed, together with the additional doorway we found down the staircase on the main platform. The station itself was less impressive than it looked from old pictures we’d found of it, but it felt very odd, in a good way, being in part of the City of London that certainly didn’t feel like a city at all. Inside the small gully it was peaceful and we encountered trees and foxes – three things we never thought we’d find in the capital. The next fifteen minutes were spent taking in the quiet atmosphere and a few photographs, before we decided to head off to the next explore we had lined up. Overall, then, the site is perfect is you’re passing through the area, especially if you fancy a break from the hustle and bustle, but it’s probably not worth travelling from further afield to visit it. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. Looking west at Highgate Station in 1868, when it first opened. Highgate Station in the 1880s, looking west, when the two side platforms were replaced. The station in the early 1940s. The old 1800s toilet block was retained and incorporated into the overall design at this point. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  2. This place is incredible! Loads of interesting things and live CCTV that you can have a play around with. We could actually see people walking past the building we were in. We heard some noise which we assumed was one of our group, but as we later found out, it was someone locking the door and we got sealed in! History borrowed from: http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/10420-centrale-de-schneider-power-station-france-january-2016/#comment-67316 Opening in the late 1950s Centrale De Schneider was a coal-fired power station in France. The original configuration two turbines made by Cie Electro-Mecanique (the French subsidiary of Brown Boveri) was expanded in the 1970s with the addition of a Rateau-Schneider generator set, bringing the total capacity up to half a gigawatt. The Electro-Mecanique turbines were retired in the early 1990s and all the associated equipment has since been removed. The power station ceased generation a few years ago when the Rateau-Schneider was also taken offline. Thanks for looking!
  3. A recent visit to this old Power Station which has been decommissioned since 2000. A planning application has been approved to demolish it and replace it with a new sustainable energy plant. Although approval was granted in 2012 nothing seems to have happened since. Lots of stuff left in situ and it's all decaying nicely. Some pictures #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15
  4. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  5. Explored with Raz Background; Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site. The Explore; So after a while of lazy chiller exploring days, it was time to once again start the stupid o clock on the motorway listening to crazy dance music heavy enough to make your head swim. Few hours later after driving through some kind of monsoon on the M62 over the Penines we were behind enemy lines in Lancashire and Cheshire. It was light by them time we hit the station, with the live site next door in full swing and trucks rolling in and out of the gates. It would appear that either myself and raz are ninja stealthy... either that or the stories we had heard about it being hard to do were exaggerated because we just waltzed in and plodded around without distribance in the middle of the day. Obviously first stop was to find the turbine hall and the old place did not dissapoint. After seeing reports IM and giggawatt i figured that all the good power stations were abroad, but this is not the case. Complete with turbines, boilers, fans Lostock is an induistrial paradise Photos; Thanks for looking
  6. The Explore So this is one I've been wanting to see for a long time but thought it was either gone now or not accessible.. then I heard otherwise and set off a few after hearing the news. We aimed to get here under cover of darkness after the horror stories of Tata pursuing people privately for trespass on this site. Turns out we got there just a little too early and had to spend an hour or in almost complete darkness listening to the horrendous noise this building makes in the wind. Also quite shocked by quite how close the live areas are to this building, at one point we were literally one door away from the live area! Great adrenaline filled explore this one was though Visited with @Funlester and a non member The History Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site.
  7. This was the first visit of 3 yesterday, we may have got here a little early as it was pitch black and had to wait around for an hour or so for the sun to come up. History - Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI. Lostock a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington, Lostock is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site.
  8. closed in the 2000s , may be turned into waste incineration plant still has the turbines and other machinary in place plenty of control rooms and pannels dials and guages nice layer of bird poo is collecting now visited with the elusive may be a bit pic heavy as there was so much to look at thanks for looking more on my flicker https://www.flickr.com/photos/128166151@N05/albums/72157661097528292
  9. Dropped by recently with The_Raw, Mr Grant, DazzaBabes and Bohemian Lad. Haven't been on-site properly since last Christmas when 28dl user Sentinel took on the wharf with his forehead and lost, lots has changed with the new chimney being 90% done and the interior being heavily scaffed up, providing new access routes to places recently less accessible. This scaff is on B side to give an idea, it was possible to clamber over any part of it including the flat level on top which was somewhat unnerving. First of all we headed into Control Room A via a new route and took a few snaps with my new lenses. And then over to B, on the way I noticed a windowed balcony similar to how Control Room A looks out onto the turbine hall, I realised I'd actually managed to get onto the door on the other side of it once before but it was locked then and now that staircase was full of asbestos sheeting and equipment, so we didn't go that route. In the meantime we headed on over to B side switch room. Back on the turbine hall floor we realised there was access to some portals underneath the room I noticed earlier and scaff up to the side of it, found a large discarded statue in some of the rooms below but I didn't snap it (not sure if anyone else did(?)), headed up the scaff beside the room and luckily the whole wall had gone missing. Not much left in the room unfortunately. Flooring and wall tiles along with the windows points towards something being here once, I thought maybe crane controls for the turbine hall. Turns out this was actually the Control Room for B side. ... or something similar to that, I'm a little confused now. After this we headed over to the new chimney to see if there was a way to access what we hoped might be a staircase on the inside, after a lot of crawling about the base of the structure managed to find an entry point to the interior. No easy way up unfortunately from within but was still a novelty, the echo in here is amazing. Was good to go back to Battersea, didn't expect to see anything new so was a nice surprise. Cheers Rawski for inviting us over. EI
  10. With Kind permission of Pontefract Town hall - Visited with Ant Background; The building was built in 1785 and was the first building ever to hold a secret ballot so is the birthplace of our modern elections. The building has many beautiful rooms one of which contains a monument to Lord Nelson. It has jail cells in it's basements the door to which can be seen on the outside of the building. The building was home to the towns police force and was the Police Station for the town over 150 years ago, when Pontefract Borough had one of the oldest established police forces in the Country. The cells were last used in the early 1960s, when the Court House in Pontefract was being renovated and the Courts were held in the Town Hall. Unfortunately the actual police station has been converted from a victorian style house of the law into a NPT desk for the WY police and so only the holidng cell and the older cells which are almost unrecognisable due to it being used as a coal store, are viewable to the public. As mentioned above the hall holds a little bit of fame, an original part of Nelsons collum showing Nelsons last moments at the battle of Trafalgar aboard the HMS Victory, which was brought to Pontefract via horse and cart in 6 pieces. Our guide Stan was kind enough to let us have a look around the Nelson room (Old court room); Thanks for looking
  11. Ferrybridge power station is situated on the River Aire, in West Yorkshire. It is the third coal-fired power station to be built on the site since 1924. The power station, often referred to as 'Ferrybridge C', first fed electricity into the national grid in February of 1966. Following a comprehensive review of its coal-fired power stations, SSE has taken the difficult decision to close Ferrybridge Power Station by 31st March 2016. Costs at the 48-year-old power station have been rising due its age and environmental legislation, and it is forecast to lose £100m over the next five years. This financial situation, combined with the political consensus that coal has a limited role in the future, means keeping the station open is not sustainable Ferrybridge C has two 198m (650ft) high chimneys and eight 115m (380ft) high cooling tower, which are the largest of their kind in Europe. Unit One (490MW) and Unit Two (490MW) at Ferrybridge power station were opted out of the Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD), and turned off once they used up their allowed 20,000 operating hours at the end of March 2014. Unit Three (490MW) and Unit Four (490MW) have been retrofitted with Flue-gas Desulphurisation (FGD) technology to enable them to comply with the LCPD. They have also been opted-in to the Transitional National Plan under the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) which provides a number of alternative options for how they will operate through to at least the end of June 2020. SSE has not made a decision on how the plant will operate and this will depend on market conditions and the effects of any future capacity mechanism. Having lived within throwing distance of Ferrybridge nearly all my life and passing it god knows how many times I had always wanted to see the inside, obviously I have seen pictures of it before but seeing it with my own eyes was pretty epic, and standing on top of the cooling towers was pretty special! I got rather lucky with this one I was in my dads shop when I got talking to a boss from the power station and he offered to let me go and have a look around the place, I snapped up the chance and headed over asap! Big thanks to him as he took most of the day off to show me around Very pic heavy The control room looked like the inside of a UFO (not that I've been in one ) Continued below
  12. So as you all now know, Network Rail were kind enough to give us a tour of the lower levels of the Train Station as we had failed numerous times to reach these areas via stealth. Explored with Raz & Jord Bit of History; Leeds railway station (also known as Leeds City railway station) is the mainline railway station serving the city centre of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. It is the second busiest railway station in England outside of London. It is located on New Station Street to the south of City Square, at the bottom of Park Row, behind the landmark Queens Hotel; it is one of 19 stations managed by Network Rail. God knows what that is in the corner of this photo... Leeds is an important hub on the British rail network. The station is the terminus of the Leeds branch of the East Coast Main Line which provides high speed inter-city services to London and is an important stop on the CrossCountry network between Scotland, the Midlands and South West England connecting to major cities such as Birmingham, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Derby, Nottingham, Reading, Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth and Penzance. There are also regular inter-city services to major destinations throughout Northern England including Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle and Sheffield. It is also the terminus for trains running on the scenic Settle to Carlisle line. Leeds is a major hub for local and regional destinations across Yorkshire such as to York, Scarborough, Hull, Doncaster and Sheffield. The station lies at the heart of the Metro commuter network for West Yorkshire providing services to Bradford, Wakefield, Dewsbury, Huddersfield and Halifax. With nearly 28 million passenger entries and exits between April 2013 and March 2014, Leeds is the busiest railway station in the North of England and the second-busiest railway station in the United Kingdom outside London, after Birmingham New Street. The Tour; Jordan had arranged the trip underneath the station with a contact of his in the weeks beforehand, and they had agreed to show us the old offices and workings under the station, and we hoped that the rumours of the old ststion beneath the current one were true. Here are a few pics of where we were taken. We went through restricted areas such as the building works for the new south side entrace, through the British Transport Police car park, and of course through the warren of tunnels and corridoors which make up the bowels of this impressive termini. At one point our guide led us through a series of doors and down a shady elevator into the car park of the Queens Hotel... a very familar smell of the Dark Arches reached out nostrils and we soon found ourselves under the arches which we had already explored many times; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9335-Dark-Arches-Revisit-July-15-(More-Photos) At this point we were all looking at each other with a slight smirk and sort of acting all like "Yeah this is cool, never seen this before... oh wow i bet its impossible to get down here" - AWKWARD!!!! And on the way out we nipped through the British Transport Police offices and as it turnes out they have a very pleasing staircase! Throughout this entire trip even though i knew i had permission to be there, i was shatting myself everytime a member of Network Rail staff came across us after a couple of years of avoiding security forces and workers!! Old habits die hard! So i leave you with this question, there is a massive amount of evidence to suggest the existance of a railway station beneath the current known working station, and we were given full access to the lower levels but we were not shown this... Is there more? Thanks for looking
  13. Hello everybody! I'm newly arrived at this forum. At first, I do not know English very well, but I try to write something about some of Russian locations. Unfot Today we would speak about abandoned railvay station on the Volga river. This place locates near the small town Volgsky and become abandoned because of low attendance of this town at the river-crouisers and ships. This place inspire me a lot. The building of riverside station include: The station hole, restaurant, undeground bomb-shelter Some pics of station hole: Bomb-shelter: This was well closed. On the rooftop: And to the end, there was a funny room with the champagne bottles under the building By the way, I with my best friend will travel around the Europe this August. We will be in France, Belgium and other countries. The full list is: Barcelona, Spain - Paris, France - Brussels, Belgium (and around) - Amsterdam, Niderlands - Germany (something around by the road to Austria) - and Austria We have not a car and will travel with the blablacar or busses/trains or smth else We will be HAPPY if somebody wants to enter russian explorers OR if somebody wants to explore with us in Belgium or in France I have not a facebook, but I can contact by the instagram direct or WhatsUp. Thank you for reading and for replies!!!
  14. Belgium Central Station - July - 2015

    Roight so most of these angles you will have already seen courtesy of mr raw but i figured id chuck mine up all the same. What an epic place! seriously lucky to have had the opportunity to get up here and see thie amazing building, big thanks to the guys in antwerp for sorting this out- you know who you are and big thanks to raw for liaising with the antwerp guys and making this possible! there is a few of the public interior thrown in aswell just to give an idea of the place as a whole, stupidly the only external i have is on film so might have to throw it up later maybe. such good fun running around the roof walkways with tripod in one hand and a beer in the other, couldn't think of a better way to spend the evening, loved looking down through the grill of the walkway and seeing all the people in the station below wandering around completely oblivious to us little scamps upstairs! Awesome once in a lifetime shizzle explored with raw, curiousgeorge and my ol mate jane. Bit of history The Antwerp Central Station is one of the world's most impressive railway stations. Dubbed the 'Railway Cathedral', it is one of the main landmarks in Antwerp. Central Station, Antwerp Central Station The railway station was built between 1895 and 1905 and replaced a wooden train station built in 1854 by engineer Auguste Lambeau. Today the whole complex is over 400 meters (1300ft) long and has two entrances, a historic domed building at the Astrid square and a modern atrium at the Kievit square. There are three levels of tracks and a shopping center which includes a diamond gallery with more than thirty diamond shops. The domed building The monumental main building was designed by the Bruges architect L. Delacenserie. It has a huge dome and eight smaller towers of which six were demolished during the 1950s. Fortunately, these were reconstructed in 2009 Clock and Antwerp Coat of Arms, Central Station, Antwerp Station interior together with several ornaments including large lion statues. The rich interior is lavishly decorated with more than twenty different kinds of marble and stone. The main hall and the railway cafeteria can match the interiors of many palaces. Not a single square meter either inside or outside the building is not decorated. The train shed Antwerp Central Station Interior The platforms are covered by a huge iron and glass vaulted ceiling, which was restored in the 1990s. Besides the platform, the vault also covers many of the small diamond and gold shops, which are part of the diamond district next to the Central Station. The huge glass vault was designed by the architect J. Van Asperen. It is 185 meters long and 44 meters at its highest point. The original platform and tracks themselves are elevated, the two lower levels were added later to accommodate the high speed train connection to Amsterdam. few internals to start and the awesomeness of the roof! spot the raw?! thanks for looking kids!
  15. Leeds (South) From Above

    Hello all, Few pics from above leeds on roof tops/car parks Train leaving Leeds Station Cheers for looking
  16. Explored with Raz & a non - member Bit of history to start; In 1864 it was proposed to build "New Station" in Leeds. Construction began in 1866 and the station was completed in 1869. The new station was built on arches which span the River Aire, Neville Street and Swinegate. The building of the station led to the creation of the 'Dark Arches' over Neville Street. Over 18 million bricks were used during their construction, breaking records at the time. Although the arches appear to be part of one single structure, closer inspection reveals that it is a series of independent viaducts two or four tracks wide. The Explore; After generally treking around Leeds looking for more rooftops we decided to have a walk down the Dark Arches and see what we could find, not expecting to be very successful how ever we were in luck! we found an access point, a quick look around and a short climb later we were in a drain Pretty cool explore really and i hope to return soon with waders so we can explore more. i doubt we even scratched the surface! Few more photos If you got this far, thanks for reading
  17. A lot of abandoned trains sleeping at the entrance of a huge forest.
  18. The original Abbey Mills Pumping Station, in Abbey Lane, London E15, is a sewerage pumping station, designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver. It was built between 1865 and 1868. It was designed in a cruciform plan, with an elaborate Byzantine style, described as The Cathedral of Sewage. It has a twin, Crossness Pumping Station, south of the River Thames at Crossness, at the end of the Southern Outfall Sewer. The pumps raised the sewage in the London sewerage system between the two Low Level Sewers and the Northern Outfall Sewer, which was built in the 1860s to carry the increasing amount of sewage produced in London away from the centre of the city. Two Moorish styled chimneys – unused since steam power had been replaced by electric motors in 1933 – were demolished during the Second World War, as they were a landmark for German bombers on raids over the London docks. The building still houses electric pumps – to be used in reserve for the new facility next door. The main building is grade II* listed and there are many grade II listed ancillary buildings, including the stumps of the demolished chimneys. The modern pumping station (Station F) was designed by architects Allies and Morrison. The old building (Station A) has electrical pumps for use as a standby; the modern station is one of the three principal London pumping stations dealing with foul water. One of world's largest installation of drum screens to treat sewage was constructed as part of the Thames Tideway Scheme. The historic pumping station at Abbey Mills is an operational by Thames Water and access is by special pre-booked tour only as you can see this place is still running in standby mode. this building use to house great big pumps all thats left of them is the base's sitting in the water. Same building as above but from higher up and taken in the day. well there you go guys
  19. Highgate Station was sited in a deep cutting immediately west of the Highgate East tunnels and when opened in 1867 it had two side platforms with the main station building on the ‘down’ (south) side at the end of an approach road and a waiting shelter on the ‘up side’. A passing loop was provided between the running tracks to accommodate trains that terminated at Highgate. A covered footbridge ran from the upper floor of the entranced building to a brick ‘tower’ on the up platform adjacent to the shelter. Immediately west of the station the line entered the Highgate West tunnels. In c.1868 an additional entrance was provided high above the station on Archway Road. The station was rebuilt during the 1880’s with a new island platform on the site of the former passing loop with a new booking office in the middle of the footbridge. The two side platforms and the original buildings were disused at this time but both platforms and the ‘up’ platform building are still extant today. This was a really easy one for me, easy access and really quiet. Visited on my day trip to Londinium and this was my first stop before heading up the hill. It's one I had wanted to do and knew if I didn't do it first it wouldn't be done. Really quiet and quite strange considering its nestled in quite a busy area. I saw 2 station workers who walked across from the tube station to do something in the locked gates but a generator or something started when they left. Sat waiting in the waiting room for them to go while listening talking to each other about Gorilla's & cat food. Can't get more random than that. Off they went and then had the time to get pics. Nice and leisurely and no issues, not even a funny story. Booooorriinnggggg!! Enjoy. As it looks now Bit of signage Platform 7 & 3/4 lol The other side Looking out from the waiting room More platform
  20. Lots Road power station (nicknamed the Chelsea Monster) was commissioned in 1905 to provide electricity for the Metropolitan District Railway, now known as the District line. It was originally coal fired and had four chimneys, but when it was converted to oil operation in the 1960's two of them were demolished. In the 1990's it was realised that re-equipping the power station would be necessary if generation of electricity was to continue, but instead it was decided to carry on running the station until the equipment's useful life expired. It shut down on the 21st of October, 2002, and since then all electricity for the London Underground has been supplied from the National Grid. All equipment has been removed and some demolition work has taken place in preparation for conversion into shops, restaurants and apartments. On 30 January 2006 the Secretary of State granted planning permission for the development. In 2007 the developer hoped to complete the scheme by 2013, it has since been delayed by the economic downturn. On 26 September 2013, developer Hutchison Whampoa Properties broke ground on the eight-acre site, rebranding it as "Chelsea Waterfront", with Mayor of London Boris Johnson speaking at the ceremony. The £1bn scheme will be "the biggest riverside development on the north bank [of the Thames] for over 100 years", and will create 706 homes. New planning and design details were conceived between 2010 and 2012. The construction for Phase One (100 apartments) is expected to be completed in 2015/16, and phase two, which includes the power station itself, in 2017/8. I did a rooftop nearby recently (see last pic) and kicked myself for not having bothered with this landmark power station yet, commonly referred to as Battersea's little sister (by me). This was a sole venture after a night in Earls Court with many beers having been consumed. I didn't fancy my chances of success much but it was a good time of day to give it a go and hey presto I was inside. Looking at previous reports not a lot has changed inside here in over 6 years but it still has a certain charm to it due to it's size and art deco design. Unfortunately there was no way I could get to the roof on my own so I may have to pop back with company. Also my pics are a bit drunk so I might return sober as well 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Thanks for looking
  21. 1st Euro jaunt of 2015 and Me, Darbians and a non member kicked off the silly seasons proceedings with this BELTER!! Be forwarned... Theres a fair few pics! ...The Blue Power Station... ... Thanks for lookin' in!
  22. Visited this place last week with Fat panda and was surprised with the amount of stuff stuffed in here. although the station closed in 1967 the electricity was still running and a few recent looking letters scattered about the place. Cheers for looking
  23. I think most people know the history of this place. It was a power station in Willington (Derbyshire) until the final part closed in late 90's and was subsequently demolished. The only thing left standing now is the 5 cooling towers and the nearby sub station. There isnt a huge amount to see around this site but it is worth a Sunday afternoon mooch if your in the area as there are a few interesting bits and pieces lieing around. Anyway, on to the pics. I wasnt in the area long as it was a late afternoon decision and the light was fading by the end. Also couldn't resist taking the last pic of the graffiti, as it was my initials lol
  24. Streatham Common pumping station was built in 1888 to a Moorish design and survives today on Conyers Road. The pumping station was constructed for the Southwark and Vauxhall Water Company. The company was formed by the merger of the Southwark and Vauxhall Water Companies in 1845 and became part of the publicly owned Metropolitan Water Board in 1903. This was more of a sneaky peek than an explore, I thought I'd post it up anyway as I can't find many pictures online. The pumping station is still in use so every entrance was heavily padlocked. I had to make do with climbing up the windows to get a glimpse of the inside so the pictures aren't great, not helped by filthy windows and piercing orange lights inside one of the rooms. I set every floodlight PIR off in order to get this close, nobody appeared so I carried on regardless. Like I say, not a proper explore as such but it's a beautiful little building that I'd been wanting to see the inside of for ages as it's just down the road from me. I was only able to see lots of control panels so I guess the pumping machinery must be underground. Anyway, here's some sketchy pictures: The control room, as you can see the orange lights made it difficult to photograph.... This was the main circular part of the building, interested to know where those stairs lead to.... This report was brought to you via much alcohol, thanks for looking
  25. Highgate station was originally constructed by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway in the 1860s on its line from Finsbury Park to Edgware. It was purchased in July 1867 by the larger Great Northern Railway (GNR) and opened on 22 August 1867. How it looked in 1868 with a passing loop in the middle for trains terminating at Highgate The station was rebuilt during the 1880s with a new island platform on the site of the former passing loop. The side platforms were from this point onwards disused. A photo from the early 20th century showing the different layout As part of the 1935 'New Works' plan to incorporate the Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace lines in to the London transport network the station was one again rebuilt with a new brick platform building. Shortly before the start of WW2 the lines began to appear on underground maps. With the start of WW2 however the service was reduced and never quite picked up again. How it looked in 1941 Closure was announced in 1953 as the number of passengers travelling on the line didn't justify it's electrification. A shuttle service continued to run until 3rd July 1954 when the station closed to passenger traffic. In the 1950s just before closure This section of line between Finsbury Park & Highgate remained open to freight traffic until 1st October 1962 and it has been abandoned ever since. I sourced the history & pics from here http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/h/highgate/ I visited with Extreme Ironing, it was a really fascinating little place even though it didn't take long to get round it. I hope to go back there some time and photograph it on a misty morning. These are the sealed off tunnels on the east side. The 1940s brickwork station The house on the right used to be part of the station but is now an occupied private property No idea what this machinery was once used for…. Old advertising/timetable boards in the middle Heading for the staircase The cage shut for the last time Through the cage you could see the bottom of the stairs bricked off with a just a worker's entrance Think this may have been an old waiting room….. Looking back along the platform The tunnels at this end (west) of the station are completely overgrown Parts of the trackbed have been covered with plastic sheeting to prevent water seepage into the northern line concourse below Thanks for looking
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