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Found 15 results

  1. Video report from Kentucky in the United States. This is an early 20th century stone house that was ironically purchased recently by a stone quarry company adjacent to the property. This house is quite rugged and I don't believe much could bring it down, they would have to bring out their biggest wrecking ball for this one lol. Hope you all enjoy
  2. A abandoned air craft shelter in west germany. 1. Gemauerter Fels 01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Gemauerter Fels 02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Gemauerter Fels 03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Gemauerter Fels 04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Gemauerter Fels 05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Gemauerter Fels 06 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 7. Gemauerter Fels 07 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 8. Gemauerter Fels 08 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  3. I visited this place last year when I was trying to see as many asylums as possible before they were knocked down or converted. I must have got to this one just in time, as last time I visited there were people living in it. It was nice to see the building being put to good use and the development company did a lovely job of the conversion with minimal demolition. History: Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November 2007, the hospital has been closed, and its has been redeveloped into luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS.
  4. This is a classic mooch from a little while back, only never got around to actually reporting it anywhere! This site is now completely redeveloped, so no chance of future explores unfortunately HISTORY Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent. The hospital has been closed since 2007 amd has since been under redevelopment into flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. AERIAL VIEW THE EXPLORE - 14.3.2012 With a little pointer from a 'contact' we were able to enjoy an explore without too much interruption. The builders were obviously having a lay in, as it wasnt until after lunchtime that they started getting suspitious! By then we'd got most of our shots and made a stealthy retreat! THE PHOTOS THANKS FOR LOOKING!! And finally! Who can you spot left in the dust?!
  5. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November, 2007 the hospital has been closed, and bids have been taken for its redevelopment to house luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000 The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. The first medical superintendent of the Asylum was Dr. Octavius Jepson, who served from the opening of the facility through 1887; on his death twelve years later, he was buried in the asylum's cemetery. He was succeeded by Dr. Ernest White, who served until his retirement in 1904. The third superintendent was Dr. Robert Hunter Steen, who was in turn succeeded in 1924 by Dr. William Robinson. Robinson retired in 1942, but due to wartime staff shortages his permanent replacement, Dr. Hardwick, was not appointed until 1946; on the takeover by NHS his new title became Physician Superintendent, which brought additional powers and responsibilities. He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1959 by Dr. Cates (1959–1963), who was the last to hold the title, as the NHS decided to delegate day-to-day operations to a chief Consulting Psychiatrist. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. , ,
  6. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent Stone House was originally constructed at a cost of £65,000 between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres and later expanded to 140 acres included a working farm. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. Closed in November 2007 and currently being redeveloped into luxury Houses/Flats Thanks for taking the time
  7. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent Stone House was originally constructed at a cost of £65,000 between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres and later expanded to 140 acres included a working farm. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. Closed in November 2007 and currently being redeveloped into luxury Houses/Flats Thanks for taking the time
  8. Well we were very disappointed with this mine due to not having our 4gas meter..... all i will say is if you go in FFS take a meter 30 yards in we could not breath hardly and that was just walking, the mine had NO air flow at all..... time for the pics first the beach with the fossils within the mine next time we go it will be with a meter and i hope better air..... if you go in please be careful ....death awaits !...
  9. UK Bolton stone mines and quarry 2011

    This was our second visit to this area, i have no history on this place all i can tell you is it is a stone quarry with 4 stone mines within the faces, there was a rail line within the quarry which went down hill to the railway for off loading there stone. on with the pics. 2 of the ways in woot. A reet nice 'miners deads' wall hope you liked the pic's ill see what info i can dig up, to be honest im mowed under with work
  10. This was are second attempt at this place, After the weekend before we were caught by secca before making it in the building we gained entry this time and were fine for a few hours then bang all the contractors lighting come on and in walk secca, Time to do legs a memory i dont think i will ever forget me and the overs running down the hallway like something out of a benny hill sketch So after we were caught well 3 of us, well done obs We where asked to delete are pics which as they were both quite understanding and we didn't seem to have any over options and it was still early and there was always plan b to be getting on with we agreed i must of pushed the wrong button as i went to delete my pics but to be honest secca NO FUCKING CHANCE so after they thought they had succeeding wasting are time , we where escorted of site were we meet back up with obs and drove of to plan b visited with wevsky ,obscurity and maniac a little history... Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November, 2007 the hospital has been closed, and bids have been taken for its redevelopment to house luxury flats.[1] Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000 [2] The buildings were designed in a Gothic brick style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients.[3] The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm.[4] Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases.[5] The first medical superintendent of the Asylum was Dr. Octavius Jepson, who served from the opening of the facility through 1887; on his death twelve years later, he was buried in the asylum's cemetery.[6] He was succeeded by Dr. Ernest White, who served until his retirement in 1904. The third superintendent was Dr. Robert Hunter Steen, who was in turn succeeded in 1924 by Dr. William Robinson. Robinson retired in 1942, but due to wartime staff shortages his permanent replacement, Dr. Hardwick, was not appointed until 1946; on the takeover by NHS his new title became Physician Superintendent, which brought additional powers and responsibilities.[7] He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1959 by Dr. Cates (1959-1963), who was the last to hold the title, as the NHS decided to delegate day-to-day operations to a chief Consulting Psychiatrist. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. on with the pics ... thanks for looking
  11. After hearing recently that contractors had begun to move on site ready to start working on the building it was time for another look around before it’s too late. Things had definitely changed up there. Equipment and offices are now on site and the building seems to have been cleared more than previously. I covered the history in my previous report which can be viewed here: http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=60493 Visited with Space invader, Maniac and Wevsky. To say the trip was interesting would be an understatement. We had gained entry through with no problems and spent a few hours exploring the asylum. Whilst looking in the basement where the power was on and equipment was running we thought it best not to hang around there too long. As we left the area a light came on. We thought we may have triggered a sensor but then the corridor lit up one light at a time and two men entered the building into the corridor. We ran for our exit in hope of escaping. As we turned to run space invader thought it was police so we picked up the pace further. It was two security guards who gave chase through the hospital and were right behind us. I managed to hide under the floor in a small room but the others got caught and shown out. After waiting a while and hearing the group leave I made my exit hoping the fence and headed for the car managing to get away with my photos. Some of the others were made to delete their pictures or face a visit from the police.
  12. Haven't checked for history yet but we did bump into a 'yocal' who started laughing as i nearly threw r lass over a well trying to light up one of many openings we found all blocked by bloody concrete walls except this one....must go back and hunt them down as this place is steeped in history and possibly a first on the net !. This is a small snippet of what we came across but it has a BIG potential for the next trip... Down two flights of steps, this place has been hand picked out and stone stairs cut into the floor, some real nice work has gone on in here... Pick markings everywhere.... 2 Candle holders 'home made style' End game ...a nice stone table and shelf.There are more stone mines on this land but without having the correct gear we left keeping a gps of this reet nice location. Hope you liked, more to come in part 2
  13. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November, 2007 the hospital has been closed, and bids have been taken for its redevelopment to house luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Gothic brick style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. Thanks to Maniac and frosty for showing me this one
  14. Visited here in early May with Frosty. History 'borrowed' from wikipedia. . . . This was quite an explore, as this building is not the easiest place to explore, but it was well worth it. Before visiting the main Hospital building, we first found the boiler house. And then found ourselves inside a smaller seperate building, maybe an accute ward or simelar? Not much to photograph in there really. Then we explored the main Hospital building. It's in damn good shape after several years of closure. After a few wards and corridors, we found the first of two large halls. There's a marble plaque at each end, one with the names of all the people involved in the origenal building of the place And a second with the names of all the people involved with the improvement and expansion work that took place some years later. Along the walkway at the top. And then the second hall which was upstairs above the first - quite how they got those pianos up there I'll never know. With fully functional stage Padded room, although this wasn't origenal I don't think - the room's been used for something since it's closure I think. Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  15. The non-active part. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. And now for the active part. 11. 12. 13. 14.
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