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Found 48 results

  1. Former water tower. Don't know much about this place, but it was cool to visit something different. Didn't made it to the top, too lazy . When we just finished this place, security came along, luckily they didn't caught us. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  2. Tower brick and tile company is a lovely little explore tucked away in the small village of Selborne. It's very isolated, with interruptions only from the occasional passing car and the swarming birds in the field opposite. The History The Brick and Tiles company have been producing hand made bricks at this site since 1872, with production finally ceasing on the 6th of November 2009 when the company went into administration. Since then there have been attempts to breathe life back into the brickworks, however all unsuccessfully. There were plans to turn the factory into a clean eco-friendly factory by using a anaerobic digester in order to generate the gas required to power the site. Unfortunately plans for this were refused in August of 2009. (Waste-to-energy plans at Selborne brickworks refused - BBC News) The Explore After attending a wedding, nothing was better to break up the niceties of suits, dresses and canapes then getting mucky and dusty on an good explore half way into the long drive home (It was pretty much on route anyway!). The weather was cloudy and slightly foggy, but it wasn't raining and it wasn't freezing so we had no complaints. Overall a pretty chilled explore with a surprising amount of equipment and machinery left and intact. As described by Mookster, this is very much a mini Clockhouse Brickworks, although getting in was far far easier. It's a shame we rushed round here a bit, as it's one of those places you could happy spend a few hours exploring. A small factory brimming with character and interesting relics of its former years. Pictures I did laugh at this The Kiln In here is the most impressive porn room I've seen so far. A big poster of how it used to look in its former days I assume? One of a few Drying ovens. Looks like a big chemical drum leaked onto the ground. Not sure exactly what it was, but I didn't really want to find out. I'm not really sure, but this looks like it could be a press used for forming the bricks/tiles.
  3. Explored with Raz on the off chance we could get in Bit of background; As the village of Ackworth grew significantly in the 1970s with several large new housing developments, water pressure became a problem. The solution was to give Ackworth a water tower of its own. Previously the water tower at Pontefract had provided the pressure regulating facility, but Pontefract too had seen significant housing development and some parts of Ackworth were literally on the end of the line, about 5 miles from the Pontefract tower. Ackworth Water Tower is located at the top of Castle Syke Hill, just off the A628 Pontefract Road. The immediate effect of the pressure improvement was a series of mains bursts over many months all the way down the water main under the A628 as it ran through Ackworth. The water main had obviously deteriorated over time but the low pressure had concelaed the problem. Any repair cascaded the problem to the next weakest point. Eventually a full water main renewal, at considerable discruption to local traffic, was the solution. The Explore; Not much to say really, we never expected to get in and we were surprised when we did, killed a few hours. Some seriously dodgey ladders here and made all the more interesting while hiding from a farmer in the next field flying round with the sun on the front of his tractor illuminating most of the site. Thanks for looking
  4. History The Newgate building, located in Newcastle City Centre was built in the early 1900’s. The Grade II listed structure, with its twin towers, ornate clock faces, sweeping curves and large windows, is a famous landmark in the city. After the 1901 site was redeveloped in 1932, it functioned as a popular shopping destination, insofar as it was considered to have been one of the most elegant venues in Newcastle for many years. In addition to the shopping areas, the building also boasted having a four room dance suite which accommodated various events ranging from cabaret nights, ballroom dancing, dance auditions, wedding receptions, corporate functions and Christmas parties. Marian, aged 76, a former sorter from 1950-56, in an interview with the Newcastle Chronicle newspaper, suggested that “it was a marvellous place to work, there was no bickering, no back-biting and if you were behind with your work people would always come and help you outâ€. In later years the entire site was best recognised as ‘the Co-op building’ since there was a large Co-op located inside. The Newgate Building closed in December 2011, to make way for a new major leisure development, a six story hotel, restaurants and a gym complex. Initially, when plans were being drawn to renovate the area in 2007, the building was estimated to be worth £25 million, however, it was eventually sold for £12 million after property prices plummeted. The Gate, which is next door to the Newgate building, was constructed in the early 2000’s and was opened on 28th November 2002. It cost approximately £80 million and was built by Land Securities. The venue is a large retail and leisure complex spread across three floors. It includes a 16 screen cinema, a casino, and a number of bars, restaurants and nightclubs. In 2010, Jamie Ritblat’s property company, Delancey purchased The Gate as part of a £900 million package of properties from the PropInvest Group. In 2012, however, it was sold to the Crown Estate for £60 million. Our Version of Events After our success in Charlton Bonds the sun was already rising and the start of a new day was already upon us. So, since the sun was up, we made a unanimous decision to skip the usual bedtime routine and crack on with something else. Next then, we came across the old Co-op building with its famous towers and, despite the lack of scaffolding, we managed to find a way inside. We were soon enjoying the early sunrise across Newcastle City Centre from up top. It was, however, quite surprisingly – since it is June after all, fairly chilly up on top; there was even a decent layer of ice on the roof. Even so, after grabbing a few shots of the towers and the surrounding bits of city, it wasn’t long before we decided to skate over to The Gate rooftop, which can be access from up there, to have a look at the view from a different angle. By now the darkness had completely disappeared, but it was worth it to see the early morning clouds roll into the city over the bridges. Just as it was time to leave, after having spent a fair bit of time up there, we realised that we’d not actually been on top of either of the towers. So, before leaving we set off in search of a way in – at least one that involved less climbing and was less nippy on the fingers. Several minutes or so later, we did indeed discover an extremely small hatch and although it took a fair bit of contortionist skill to get past this obstacle we managed to get inside one of the clock towers. It was worth it; it always is to get a little higher. Explored with Ford Mayhem and Soul. 1: The Newgate Building (Taken After the Explore) 2: Early Morning on Newgate 3: One of the Towers 4: St. James Park and a Crane 5: The Two Towers 6: One of the Clock Faces 7: Inside the Newgate Building 8: The Small Gap in the Hatch 9: From Newgate Tower 10: Flagpole 11: Early Morning Fog 12: Newcastle City 13: More of Newcastle City 14: The Gate Rooftop 15: Window Cleaning Rig 16: View from The Gate 17: Looking Over The Gate 18: The Towers from The Gate 19: Rooftop Bits and Bobs 20: Icy Floors
  5. First post on here so here goes; While working away last week over in Ellesmere Port near Liverpool i found myself bored and stuck on my own in a hotel, so after a quick google search which gave me nothing but derp or demolished buildings, i decided on the good old method of getting out on foot and going for a walk around and quickly found this baby. After squeezing through a crazy small gap and avoiding truckers i found myself in a game of cat and mouse with the Liverpool Port Authority who were patrolling the Liverpool - Manchester Canal - Great fun. The climb up was pretty much uninterupted aside from the odd pigeon, however once on the top with the tripod out i was spotted by the Port Authority who quickly started to make their way over to me. However in a truly ninja fashion i scaled back down the tower and followed the famous D's of dodgeball to get away (Dodge, dip, dive and dodge) back through the squeeze and out into the freedom. Hope you like this and i hope to post more soon!
  6. Visited with Maniac, The_Raw and MiaroDigital. The tower was originally a Martello tower which was part of the UK Napoleonic defenses, there were over 100 of these towers built along the south coast in the 1800's. It was converted into a water tower in 1902 (in fact there are two of them on the site, both identical) and the one we climbed around also had a lookout post attached to it which why it had those extra rooms on the side. (Thanks to Maniac for this information) Later, the area was used for training of young navy recruits. Unfortunately we didn't get much further than the tower and couldn't explore the other buildings, because shortly afterwards we were escorted "friendly" from the ground... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  7. I think this can be described as a 'hidden gem' for sure. It's kind of like a half-size Clockhouse Brickworks and with just as much stuff to look at. As far as explores go it was the most peaceful chilled out and generally relaxed wander I've had for a long time, helped by the glorious weather. On the way out, we were stopped by one of the buildings caretakers/ex-workers who was relieved to see we were only taking photos and myself and Landie had quite a long chat with him about the site, the buildings they supplied bricks for, and other stuff. He informed us that there is a staff of nine people who work on the land and farm around the site and look after the place. He also said that the planning application for works expires this July and they will be looking to do 'something' with it before it lapses. The Selborne Brickworks was first opened in 1901 and extended later in life to it's current size. It was bought out by Tower Brick & Tile Co. and closed in 2009 as a result of the recession. Like with Clockhouse, when it shut down it did so without notice, so everything was left inside as it was the day it closed. There are still racks of roofing tiles in one of the dryers and bricks in the kilns. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653556365939
  8. Tower Bridge Magistrates Court is a Grade II listed building dating back to 1906. The three storey building was designed by John Dixon Butler with a stone and brickwork exterior and an Edwardian Baroque style roof. The Court entrance is flanked by high socles supporting giant Ionic columns to the 1st and 2nd floors with the Royal coat of Arms above. There are 3 courtrooms, two are formal dark wood panelled traditional courtrooms and one is a late 1970's relatively modern courtroom. The court closed it's doors in June of last year and there are now plans for it to be turned into a hotel. I've had my eye on this for a good while, it has 24hr security inside the building and various people turn up to to work in the offices upstairs. With no obvious ways inside and with so much activity I was thinking of trying for a permission visit but just hadn't got around to it. Then something amazing happened when myself and Gabe walked past at 6am after a night of rooftopping and drinking. We rang the doorbell, security came to the door, barely even looked at us and just waved us straight in as though he was expecting us. We waltzed straight past him like we were meant to be there and disappeared through the first door we could see. We managed an hour sneaking around inside before a different security guy found us and asked us who we were. We gave him a load of cock and bull about how we were doing a photography project and our lecturer had arranged our visit. After checking his records he said we would have to come back another time when permission had been established, apparently the guy who opened the door for us was on his first shift and had assumed we were meant to be there. It was a hilarious adventure from start to finish, the only gutter was we didn't get to see Court No.1. Still, we saw the two other courts, found loads of cells downstairs, and ventured into part of the police station before we got rumbled. I took a few externals months ago before the hoarding went up.... Reception Area Court No. 2 Court No. 3 Heading for the cells Check-in Counter The Cells Taking the piss Our friendly but confused escort showing us the towards the door Sneaky last pic before we left, the door to Court No.1 on the far right, the one that got away..... [ Thanks for looking
  9. UK 1 Nine Elms Tower Crane - August 2014

    This tower closed alongside the rest of the site for redevelopment in May of this year. The entire place was gutted when I looked through the building unfortunately and they were/are in the process of bringing the tower down, level by level. Had my eye on it for awhile and was keeping tabs, The_Raw brought it to my attention again when some new access points became available, went up there with him and 2 non members early one morning. First crane I've been up top of. c: Only made it about half way out on this section. Cab absolutely stunk of sweat and aftershave, eyuk. A lot of fun for me. Thanks for looking.
  10. This disused power station was once a coal-fired monster. Owned by Belgium's Electrobel it was mothballed in the early 2000s and then finally taken out of service in 2006 and is currently being demolished. With demolition well under way this might be the last we see of this beast. The cooling tower may live on to see another day however and is definitely one of those sites that has to be seen with your own eyes. We had a decent mooch around in there and crawled through the mud to get underneath and then set about crossing the bridge of feral cats towards the power station. We had to dodge the demo team to get inside, they appeared to be pulling it down from the bottom up as the ground floor was mainly stripped out, this caused a lot of dust in the air. We spent a couple of hours inside until the level of dust got too much and made our way out with minimal fuss. It was a shame we didn't find the control room but we saw a lot of other cool stuff and it was a great start to our weekend. Hope you enjoy the pics and thanks to the rest of the crew for making this a great trip! Looking up from the entrance Elliot snapping away No Black Gloves? Too cool for school or too camp for camp? Heading for the power station Quick shaky shot as we ran past the turbine to hide from workers below..... Pipes and Art Deco windows Looking down, the worker's van just visible.... Loved this bit of graff Looking out above the conveyor belt shafts Inside the conveyor belt shaft You could see 3 or 4 storeys directly beneath your feet through these wobbly walkways The view of the Cooling Tower from the roof Overlooking the worker's van in the turbine hall The Lab Last but not least some turbine shots.... Wish we could've had a closer look at these but there was too much of a risk of getting seen unfortunately Thanks for looking
  11. Upper Heyford Water Tower – June 2014 Having explored much of this disused/part used USAF base in Oxfordshire with my good friend TBM; and since its all being torn down and redeveloped, including peoples homes which the RAF built for the USAF in the 1960s, and we have explored much of it but sadly not the Water Towers, we decided that we were well overdue. We went Midsummer to catch the best sunrise and were on the top of this awesome water tower by 03:50am and made our descent at about 06:15. It was an incredible, magical sunrise and a wonderful night of taking photos. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Video time lapse More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157645337458012/
  12. Christmas Common Relay Tower – June 2014 Visited with TBM a while back in June, the delay is down to needing to take the time to edit the video. We visited what we HOPE is a disused relay tower. It has one drum, maybe a repeater, on the side but the land is so overgrown and unkempt I’m not sure. Formerly a Radio Relay site and a USAF Microwave Transmission Tower, it looks like this was used until recently and is in a decaying state. It looks like it was used up until maybe the last 2 or 3 years. The MOD sold the site in 2004. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 Video https://flic.kr/p/ooZwx2
  13. I've been planning to meet up with someone, who often explores in the Salford area for a while now but things always got in the way, like the weather for example! we rescheduled our meeting a few times and eventually got together on a perfectly mild Spring evening. There was plenty of high places to choose from, with relatively hassle free access. We first went to the Holiday Inn but got stopped in our tracks by a bar man so we decided to head out towards Millennium Tower. It was fairly straight forward once we were in and spent around an hour on the roof. The air quality was pretty poor that night due to the Salford recycling plant fire which really affected my images. After a while we decided to try our luck at the Holiday Inn again. This time we got in and spent another hour or so on the roof. Overall a really enjoyable night spent admiring the Quays :-) MILLENNIUM TOWER Millennium Tower is a 220 feet tall development situated on the waterfront at Salford Quays. It’s a block of luxury penthouse apartment with 20 floors. With its contemporary architecture, the complex is situated within walking distance of the Media City and the Lowry Centre. The tower block offers luxurious living space, whilst helping to transform the Salford Quays skyline. HOLIDAY INN The Holiday Inn Express is located in thriving Salford Quays, surrounded by the water & history of the Manchester Ship Canal & within 1 mile of Manchester United Football Club (Old Trafford), the Lowry Theatre & the Imperial War Museum. The glass-fronted, 16-floor hotel is in MediaCityUK's studio block. Thanks for looking
  14. abandoned cooling tower in Belgium. 1. 2.
  15. I have held out on this for a very long time trying to find history "Just that little bit different", But failed miserably, Theres lots out there referring to title deeds, Access rights under peoples gardens etc but no real history about who built it and when, When construction started and when it was finalized etc. Visited with a very good friend of mine who despite much nagging still hasn't joined up on here , Anyways enough of my drivel on with some pics And thats all folks, Thanks for browsing through my piccies
  16. Visited with juicerail, on arrival it was apparent that the storms had done us a favour by blowing the hoarding over so it didn't take us long to find a way inside. On the ground floor three panels of wood covering the lift shafts with black streaks running down them reminded me slightly of the bleeding doors bizarrely. Aside from those every floor was pretty much identical, stripped bare and ready for development so we headed straight for the roof to catch the sunset. We were soon followed by two Chinese lads with their cameras. Probably not the greatest idea to be wandering about up there in broad daylight as unbeknown to us a member of the public had spotted us and called the police fearing one of us was about to commit suicide. Luckily we caught the best of the sunset before we heard a symphony of sirens heading for us and we realised our days were numbered. Four police cars, one on every corner of the building awaited us so we headed downstairs to take our telling off and were sent on our way without too much of a drama. The story behind the monstrosity: This spectacularly ugly 1960s concrete tower block has been a sizeable blot on the Colliers Wood skyline in south London for years on end. The Colliers Wood Tower has enjoyed several names over the years, starting life as the “Lyon Tower†(after its original occupants, property company, Ronald Lyon Holdings), as well as â€ÂThe Vortex†and the â€ÂBrown & Root Towerâ€Â, and several unprintable names. A truly hated building, the tower got off to a bad start when the first attempt at construction was found to contain serious errors, so the three storeys that had already been built were demolished and the project started again from scratch. Such is its unpopularity, it romped home to be crowned the ugliest building in London in a 2006 BBC poll, and it also made the top 12 in Channel 4′s UK-wide Demolition programme in 2005. The same BBC poll quoted an architect working for Golfrate Property Management (the current owners) as saying the building was due a make-over and new lease of life. By 2009, the building was in such a parlous state that the ground and first floor windows and doors were boarded up, and green netting draped across the sides to prevent falling debris causing injury to passers by. There was also reports of the premises being used for making porn movies.... Sometime in Spring 2011, two cosmetic slabs of cladding were attached to the building to give an indication of how its appearance may be improved, while the adjacent spiral car park was finally demolished in June 2011. These are a much lighter colour than the underlying concrete surface and would change the look of the Tower significantly if installed across the building but subsequently no more significant have taken place. Planning permission has been granted for the conversion of the Tower and an extension to the north (towards Colliers wood underground station) to provide 150 apartments, with shops on the ground floor. The planning permission also allows for an extension to the south (to be built as part of a second phase) providing another 68 apartments. In February 2014, Criterion put out tenders out for their ‘Construction Work Packages’; this is for contractors to build-out the scheme. These tenders will be assessed in March 2014. The construction team is anticipated to be in place, and on-site in April 2014. Once on-site works commence, the scheme build-out will be around 18 months. Anticipated completion is autumn 2015. The pics: 1. 2. 3. The sort of bleeding doors..... 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. A few more piccies here: Colliers Wood Tower - a set on Flickr Thanks for looking
  17. IM COOLING TOWER Visited with members Chaos and non member Markymark This was a small part of our little long weekend European Derp tour. After a decent nights sleep in a campsite, a hot shower and belly full of Belgian wangers, beans and eggs we set off early to our first location of the day. As we drove through this heavily industrial region of Belgium we got a good insight into the epicness of some of the industry in the area. It truthfully is amazing how much potential there is in Belgium, everywhere you look there is derps and industrial abandonment. In the end we decided to bin off the power station itself due to time constraints and wanting to see more preferable locations. The Tower The cooling tower is a hyperboloid style tower, they have become the design standard for all natural-draft cooling towers because of their structural strength and minimum usage of material, the hyperbolic shape of the tower enhances aerodynamic lift due to the wind passing over it which increases the air flow rate. The air flows into the openings in the bottom which rises up and cools the entering hot water. The cooled water cascades down to the bottom of the tower whilst the warm moist air exits out of the top. In its hey day this tower would have been able to cool up to 480,000 gallons of water a minute. Its a fascinating bit of engineering. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Thanks for looking
  18. Tower Crane Essex Innit!

    This is five minutes of your life you will never get back. Thanks for watching. :-)
  19. UK Essex Tower Crane.

    Visited twice autumn 2013. The first night was well below zero and the ground hard, the second was well over zero and had to wade through ankle deep mud. On with the photos. Not far to go now! Lastly a selfie! Have a great week all. SB. x
  20. An Oldie but a goodie. Be careful what you say to your kids, you may just have to live up to your word, I may have said; in passing "what an experience it would be to stay in the fort overnight, completely cut of from land". Low and behold we try it. Arrived on the beach in the towering shadow of the power station around 4pm. Ever tried walking over cobbles covered in slime, mud and full of rock pools, while carrying substantial survival essentials. quite comedic for someone watching I should think. Had a quick look around the place, dodging around some pretty big holes in the floor. Whilst at the very top of the tower a group of about 6 or 7 people could be seen sliding over the cobbles, we sat aside and let them wonder, as we were going to have plenty of time to look. Had a good chat with a couple of them to, but didn't think to ask if they were on any forums. So hello if you are, a pleasure meeting you. Just when we thought the visits were over, 2 young lads turned up to fish, but found the weirdos staying on the castle much more interesting. They proceeded to try and scare us with storys of police, lifeboats and dead soldiers. One lad securely re-fitted the ladder for us which he said he installed originally. I must admit I thought he was going to nick it, but credit due. Sitting staring at the shipping going past, we noticed shadows darting across the floor, on closer inspection we found what seem to be woodlice, however they must have been special sea castle lice, as they were huge, big enough that you could see the individual organs within their transparent bodies, nice. (Later established that they are known as "Sea Slaters") Midnight, decided to try and get some kip. However; who knew the sea moving up and down over hidden pipework and holes could make such a muddle of sound, from thudding to whispers, I think we managed about an hour. Time to get up and finish the supplies, about a litre of hot chocolate and 3 Ham and Egg roles later, I managed to straighten my spine and check the tide. I must admit that as much as I enjoyed my stay I was looking forward to getting back to my bed. Slip slide across the cobbles we look back and see the red of the sun breaking the horizon, lighting the quarter moon, casting a silhouette of the fort. I didn't care at this point, I didn't even take a picture; just carried on slipping back to my bed. Good to think I'll have to do it again in a few years, once the little lady is big enough. Still time will let me look back with fondness I am sure. Cheers t2020
  21. Evening all, Slowly getting up to date with my locations hence being slow with reports. This was a late July trip with two exploring mates who had never seen Belgium before but have seen the touristy places and like us all, wanted to go and do them. So the three days were a mix of new and old locations and some right corkers. This is nothing new to anyone, was a revisit into the cooling tower at IM. Didn't have my wellies so didn't get underneath but did manage some different shots. Just three here tonight Thanks for looking in.
  22. This was a great visit, apart from the fact I had a really bad cold! 22 flights of stairs climbed and we finally were at the top... I almost died there and then through coughing! There wasn't much of interest in the actual tower itself as it was pretty stripped out, but the views from the roof were brilliant. Dalton Tower was a halls-of-residence for students studying at Aston University. It was built in 1970 along with Lawrence and Stafford Towers. In May 2011 Dalton Tower, along with Lawrence Tower, were demolished to make way for new buildings. On with my photos... Lawrence Tower's to the left in this photo. Just after I'd taken the photo above, a police car pulled up outside the university building. It was funny to see them, but we were crossing our fingers they didn't look up and see us! There were more places to take photos from, but myself and one other had a train to catch so unfortunately had to leave before we got the chance. Thanks for looking
  23. Visited here on Day 3 of the trip, second explore of the day, and even got busted for the first time. Didn't stop us getting our shots though, Baron was busy flirting with the Secca and kept him occupied for a few minutes. I did wonder why Baron was on his knees when I came out the Tower though.... hmmmmmm........ How many shots of a cooling tower can you take, its seems quite a lot actually. Jolly good explore!
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