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Found 58 results

  1. Supply shaft - west a abandoned part of a german steal factory... 1. Supply shaft west 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Supply shaft west 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Supply shaft west 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Supply shaft west 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Supply shaft west 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Supply shaft west 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Supply shaft west 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Supply shaft west 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Supply shaft west 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. Supply shaft west 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 11. Supply shaft west 11 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 12. Supply shaft west 12 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 13. Supply shaft west 13 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  2. Morning Post on Facebook this morning from a guy I follow, "The Walking Englishman", he gets bloody everywhere. No Mytholmes on Google Maps, but a pic of the Haworth one... Clicky Google Streetview's a pain in the arse on this laptop or I'd pin point it a bit better... I'll go through his recent posts a bit better when I have a minute - he sometimes publishes his routes - & see if I can work out where the other is too.
  3. Hi Has anyone ever been around here? I'm off to the area pretty soon & found this place on Google maps... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNAS_Dale_(HMS_Goldcrest) Google Earth shows what appear to be quite a few intact(ish) barrack blocks & outbuildings, & the place was only used 1941-48, so I'm hoping there'll be something original. Privately owned by a farmer since it was de-commissioned, looks like it was just farmed around the edges.
  4. Hello there boys and girls, just wanted to say a quick 'ello from the North West, been around for a little while with a few explores now under the hat.........recognise a few on board here Hopefully get to meet a few more Thanks Will Knot
  5. So I heard about this place from a previous report so decided to have a look around. After gaining access immediately once we were on the site, we discovered that its fairly large, the corridors seem to go on forever. A majority of the floor has been taken up and there are random items dotted about in various different rooms. We also discovered a basement which we ventured into, which turned out to also go on forever. Away from the main building there are several small outbuildings with other junk and old documents. We also managed to find 2 of the server rooms. THE BASEMENT
  6. Hello, my name is Mark and I'm from the wild's of Cumbria. I have been doing Urban Exploration for about six months now. Got afew reports to put up soon and a list full of locations for future mooching so, hopefully more to come;)
  7. This building was actually a single room schoolhouse, and on Sundays, the chairs were turned and it served as a chapel to the small hamlet of Bedham. It was built in 1880 and abandoned in about 1960. A nice casual explore, and one I have wanted to see for a while. Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed
  8. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find any information on this one. A nice easy 15 minute visit on my walk around the harbour. Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed.
  9. Germany Metal factory - west - 2014

    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.
  10. Revisit 03.2014 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.
  11. Visited this place back in Dec 2013 With West Park Hospital rapidly getting redeveloped this one is worth a few minutes if your passing. Couple of professional pool tables still left inside, and considering it was left abandoned around 2007 I'm surprised it's not a total wreck. Disturbingly a few signs of some paper being burnt, so hopefully the place doesn't go down that path. I'm Lucky management didn't refuse entry on this occasion
  12. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.
  13. So a few days past and me and Mookie began our big road trip up North; by first going west to a beautiful Mill tucked away in the West Country. A place time seems to have forgotten, with little physical decay in place. The mill remains a completely water-powered cloth finishing works, established by the Fox Brothers and Co and dates from 1830. The remains of the water wheel are still in-situ; including the line shafting and gearing. An electric motor was later installed to supplement the water-wheel during times of drought; however, amazingly, the water wheel continued to be used for many decades after. Simplifying the industrial process here; the mill comprises of a number of key areas to accommodate the various stages of production: -A Fulling area, where wet cloth was dried, scoured, cleaned and milled to the desired finish. -A dying room, adjacent to the fulling area which specialised in producing an indigo colouring. -Reservoirs and Sluice gates, to manage the flow of water into the wheel chamber. -The wheel chamber and a later power house. . Amazingly, the works finally closed in 2000 and production was moved to a more contemporary location. The buildings and machinery are Grade II* listed, but continue to sit. This was the last woollen mill in the West Country. The site is of European significance. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157642390487303/
  14. Wasn't going to bother with a report as to be fair there may be one from about 4 years ago from me,well it was this mixed with another place.. Anyhow its sunday and im so very bored so here's some pics from a recent less crowded trip Brief stolen history Pictors And an odd portrait one cos i dont have another to match it up Nothing new by any means but i was killing time in here so be rude not to grab some more updated pics
  15. RAF RAYNHAM, Raf SCULTHORPE and a old farm. North Norfolk. July 2013 Rather than bore you to death with 3 posts that have all been done to death, I thought I would whack the day trip into 1 report. Visited with my good side kick and mini me daughter, Theanonymousexplorer, Seeker and his wife. This was more of a jolly and time to have a play as it was the start of the school hols 1st stop was Raf Raynham, this was good fun. Managed to have a little look around the boiler room and the officers mess before getting chucked out by the onsite security after getting spotted and grassed on by the lawnmower man. So next stop (after a short visit to the cock + pullit cafe was usaf/raf sculthorpe.... What a surprise we got here. After the usual walking around the HQ and police block, we headed up to the ATC tower and found a big red thing. We had a good look around and then headed of before we out stayed our welcome. The other side of Fakenham was our last stop, the old dairy farm. This was a nice little site with a few bits to shoot, but a day in the summer scorchio sun had taken its toll, and we headed of in our quest to find ice cream. Raynham Sculthorpe The old dairy farm
  16. "It's a dyeing trade" Brook Dyeing were a large company with at least four sites to It's portfolio. They were commission dyers to a host of textile companies throughout West Yorkshire. We all know the scenario though! The textile trade dwindles, we are flooded with cheaper imports and the inevitable closure of our traditional woolen mills ensue. This then seemed to signal the death knell for this particular site, and the order books are no more. There's a lot of activity within this complex. It seems as though certain parts are being rented out to various company ventures! As to what will happen to the actual dye plant Itself is anyone's guess. Let's have a butchers then. With It being associated with dyestuff, one would expect a rather colorful affair. Yeah...... I would agree with that. Workers had a fine choice of buckets and bins to choose from so they could happily weigh their dye recipes in. You would also need a set of scales for precision measuring. Not forgetting the dye. A nice bit of yellow. The business end of things. The dye pans themselves. That was your step by step easy guide Another door...... And even more to explore. The sample room, and lots of pretty little boxes. And lab vessels. It had a nice little office that was packed with goodies. And a cool comfy leather chair. This place never seems to end. Wooden stairs leading everywhere. Lots of weird and wonderful machinery to feast upon. Capturing the moment judderman style. Lets nip outside for a minute. Bit of fresh air. Filtration tanks. And the rather splendid view. Steel pipes. Luv em. The huge twin boiler. Heading out. There's simply too much to cover. So It's time to say adios my friends. And as always..... Ta for looking.
  17. A few old photos of West Park from a very brief trip in 2010. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Thanks for looking visit my site for my of my old reports: www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com
  18. Info from the net... The post-war 'baby-boom' resulted in a much higher number of teenage children in the 1950s. Liverpool Corporation embarked on a massive school building programme.. West Derby High School was opened in September 1957 by the first Head Teacher who was Mr A.L Casson. The school was designed by Liverpool Architects Harold E Davies and Sons to house 540 boys. Harold E Davies died in 1952, so it is unlikely that he was involved with the plans, his son Harold Hinchcliffe probably designed the building which took about two years to complete. Originally West Derby was designed to be used in collaboration with nearby Holly Lodge girls school, and in 1984 there were unsuccessful plans to merge the two schools into one. West Derby School is now a single site school as of September 2010 when it relocated a few hundred yards to a brand new building on West Derby Road, as part of the Building Schools for the Future scheme. Famous ex-pupils include.. * Actor Craig Charles * Radio DJ Kev Seed * Actor George Wilson 1957 This is the Bankfield Road Wing...
  19. After today's main adventure I popped in to West Park, exactly 4 years and 3 months since my first visit in 2009. I guess part of it was closure for me on the place that seriously got me into this big time, prior to my first visits to West Park in August 2009 I had visited Hellingly and Fullers Earth in June, however my six visits to West Park between August and October of that year really cemented in my mind that this was for me. After our quick mortuary detour we had a little drive around the site, to see the (admittedly brilliantly done) conversion of the admin block, as I pointed out to my mate who'd never seen West Park as anything other than a building site what each building used to be and what used to be inside it, and pointed out the rough location of the now demolished buildings. I won't say it was entirely sad for me, as a lot of the place has been saved in relation to other asylums and indeed others in the Epsom Cluster, but it was in a way as loads of good memories came flooding back in a wave of nostalgia. It was also interesting for me to notice that the room only accessible through a hole in the stud wall was the old slab room due to the gulleys in the floor. The partition wall was put in after the slabs were removed, I believe at the same time the original chapel was demolished in the 1980s. Farewell West Park, for the final time.
  20. Hi there everybody, my name is Neil and I live in West Cumbria, been a member here a while but just started having a mooch around! I've never been exploring but would love to have a go, non of my mates are into it and I don't fancy going alone! Not a photographer either but I love reading all the reports and checking out the cool photos so here I am! Cheers!
  21. This one is thanks to Drinkinbud's mate who has a local pub and gave him the nod, he gave me a shout and off we went. This place has been a club, a munitions store a rollerskate rink, a cinema and a stable in it's 165 year history. It closed several years back, which seems odd to me seeing as it's position and condition would lead me to think it would be profitable. Up for Sale for £100,000 with £100,000 pa ground rent too, no wonder it hasn't been bought! Here's some pics! I'm sure I did this report once before.........hey if it's a duplicate, fine!
  22. Something else I have been waiting an absolute eternity to do, but was finally given the opportunity so seized it with both hands, Visited with Non member Dan H, A bit of History borrowed again from a highly respect site: The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route. The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels. Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system with manhole covers (still visible) in the roads above. There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty. There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. The Very Famous "Please Refrain From Spitting" Sign Stenciled onto the wall And Finally one of me messing around Thats all folks, thanks for taking the time to view my pics
  23. I have a new site that I'm itching to explore, and my usual crew are unavailable for a few weeks. Anyone fancy hooking up?? I'd quite like to meet other like minded people, and also want to get this done before the local chav's move in, or developers..... PM me if you're interested, thanks P.s, sorry if this isn't the way to go about meeting others. Not been here for long
  24. Shoreham Cement works June 13. Due to security presence, we were confined to the one building...but what a big building to be stuck in! Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed!
  25. I realise this site has been done to death, so I'll just share some of the not so common photo's. This was another early explore of mine (and also a revisit), so please excuse the orange-ness (cloudy day setting), and the dreaded date stamp :/ The guardian... Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed!
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