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Found 27 results

  1. History Once the magnificent property in East Germany housed a spa building. Around 1950, the building was converted into a hotel, which was given the name of a Duchess. In the 90s, it was closed for cost reasons, since it decays visibly. The Explore Access was easy; the front door was locked, but some open windows and a open door at the back. My first visit was in 2011. Now I returned to see how the building has changed over the past seven years. Many ceilings and floors had collapsed meanwhile, and some areas I could't enter therefore. Unfortunately, some things were destroyed by vandalism or were stolen. For example, all banisters and the ornamented window arches. But on the other hand, the natural decay of the past few years has been very interesting. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Here are also a few comparison pictures and some photos from 2011 of rooms that couldn't be entered anymore today. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 - Also this rose has been gone due to the collapse of the ceiling.
  2. Another exploration from the past. History In the area were several mining operations in the 19th century and many of the miners suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis. Therefore, in 1897, a sanatorium for the patients with lung disease and anemia was founded. In 1975, this sanatorium was converted into a rehabilitation clinic with physical therapy centre. It was closed in 2002. In January 2009, the former clinic was vandalized for the first time. Unknown people broke into the building and sprayed several fire extinguishers. The police search for the perpetrators remained fruitless. After many years of vacancy, there are plans to convert the building into apartments. My visit The large, L-shaped building had four floors and a newer extension. Exploring the interior was fascinating. The kitchen was almost completely furnished with stoves, large pots, cookware and much more. In many areas there were still furniture and interesting details, and on the lower floor the bathrooms and a swimming pool. I spent several hours there; it was lonely and quiet, and definitely a really worthwhile visit. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 - Title: What Everyone Should Know about Sexuality and Potency 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Thanks for watching.
  3. The former hotel has been closed in 2007 and from the outside the building was unmistakably abandoned. But inside, it largely looked as if you only have to perform a few beauty repairs in order to use the hotel again. My visit was already in 2012. I was told that the entrances were sealed later. I don't know what has become with it today. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
  4. Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. Hobling consists of four combat blocks. The blocks are linked by an underground gallery with barracks and a utility area (usine). The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). In June 1940 the garrison comprised 115 men and 4 officers of the 164th Fortress Infantry Regiment (RIF). The commanding officer was Captain Boileau. The Casernement de Férange provided peacetime above-ground barracks and support services to Hobling and other positions in the area. The units were under the umbrella of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. Hobling remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Sold in 1975, Hobling has been partially stripped by salvagers and is abandoned. The salvage work stopped with the removal of all metals, including cloches and turrets, from two blocks. Hobling was the last ouvrage to be stripped. Visited with @The_Raw 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  5. The colliery Saint Fontaine was opened in 1908. For the extraction of hard coal, they dug to a depth of 1037 meters. In the 1960s, up to two million tons of hard coal were mined. In 1972 the colliery was closed for the first time, but in 1976 the operation was resumed. In 1986, the final closure, whereupon a large part of the buildings were demolished. Today, apart from the listed tower, only the administrative building including the locker room / pithead baths exists. In recent years, unfortunately, there was a lot of vandalism; last the ceiling lamps were destroyed by some idiots. In Saint Fontaine, there were repeated fatal accidents. On 3 January 1933, 36 miners were killed in a gas explosion. On May 29, 1959, another 26 workers were killed in another explosion. On September 23, 1968, three miners smothered. Visited with @The_Raw. 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  6. The well-known 18th century building was once the central administration of a nearby steelworks. Visited with @The_Raw , @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  7. Fort Jeanne d'Arc, also called Fortified Group Jeanne d'Arc, is a fortification located to the west of Metz in the Moselle department of France. It was built by Germany to the west of the town of Rozérieulles in the early 20th century as part of the third and final group of Metz fortifications. The fortification program was started after the German victory of the Franco-Prussian War, which resulted in the annexation of the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine from Germany to France. The Fort Jeanne d'Arc was part of the Moselstellung, a group of eleven fortresses surrounding Thionville and Metz to guard against the possibility of a French attack aimed at regaining Alsace and Lorraine, with construction taking place between 1899 and 1908. The fortification system incorporated new principles of defensive construction to deal with advances in artillery. Later forts, such as Jeanne d'Arc, embodied innovative design concepts such as dispersal and concealment. These later forts were designed to support offensive operations, as an anchor for a pivoting move by German forces into France. The Feste Kaiserin, as Fort Jeanne d'Arc was called by the Germans, with seven other Metz forts, assured the protection of Metz against French attack. It is one of the largest of the Metz forts. Positioned to the rear of the principal lines of combat in the First World War, the fort never saw combat in that war, but was captured by advancing American forces in the Lorraine Campaign of World War II after resisting for nearly a month. Fort Jeanne d'Arc was designed for a garrison of 1900 men and armed with six 100mm guns in two batteries, six 150mm howitzers in two batteries and four 77mm guns in casemates. Four separate fortified barracks housed troops, with underground galleries connecting the battery, barracks, and infantry positions. In addition, four bastion-like points on the north, south, east and west housed infantry strongpoints. Barbed wire entanglements were swept by 77mm guns firing from bastions or counterscarp positions. The east and west strongpoints were separately enclosed with barbed wire entanglements and had their own barracks, while the west point additionally had an earthwork rampart with a caponier. A total of seven reinforced barracks had a capacity of 2580 troops. The fortified barracks were built into a hillside so that their rears are shielded by earth, while the tops and fronts are protected by three or four metres of concrete, and are surmounted by parapets. The batteries are similarly constructed and linked to the barracks by underground tunnels at an average depth of 8 metres (26 ft) to 11 metres (36 ft) metres, extending over 2,350 metres (7,710 ft). The whole was surrounded by deep networks of barbed wire, which were swept by fire from small perimeter blockhouses, also linked via the tunnel system. The interior of the position was equipped with trenches for infantry. The barracks and batteries were further armoured with reinforced concrete and armored windows. A variety of blockhouses and infantry shelters were also built in the intervals between forts. The fort's surface extends over 121 hectares (300 acres). The dispersed, un-walled nature of the later Moselstellung was a significant innovation. Compared to the French Séré de Rivières system forts of the same era, German fortifications were scattered over a large area and enclosed chiefly by barbed wire. While certain individual elements presented imposing walls to an attacker, these walls were not continuous. The dispersed nature is evidenced by the official French name: the Groupe Fortifié Jeanne d'Arc (Fortified Group of Jeanne d'Arc). These arrangements were studied and improved upon by the French in the construction of the Maginot Line. Begun in 1899, Jeanne d'Arc was completed in 1908 and saw no action during World War I, as Metz remained well within German lines for the duration of the war. The fort was initially named Feste Point du Jour, but was renamed Feste Kaiserin on 12 May 1900. The fort was reinforced with concrete over the original stonework between 1912 and 1914. Some of the original yellow stone remains visible on the face of the barracks, ornamented with elaborate reliefs. With the Armistice of 1918, Lorraine was returned to France and the fort became French property. The Metz fortifications contributed some of their long 100mm guns to replace the short 100mm guns at Thionville when France upgraded the Thionville sector to back up the Maginot Line fortifications in the area. Fort Jeanne d'Arc was the headquarters for the French 3rd Army in 1940. During the Battle of France the Metz area was bypassed and encircled by German forces, with the Maginot and earlier fortifications seeing little action before the Armistice of 1940. In September 1944, the U.S. 5th and 90th Infantry Divisions of the U.S. Third Army, approached Metz from the west. They encountered the western arc of Metz defenses, including Fort Jeanne d'Arc and its neighbors Fort Driant to the south and Fort François de Guise to the north. The defenses of Metz were manned by the 462nd Volksgrenadier Division, attached to the German First Army, Army Group G. A total of about 9,000 to 10,000 combat-ready troops occupied Metz. The combined fire of the forts stopped the American advance once initial contact had been made. An attack on Fort Driant beginning on 27 September was finally called off on 9 October after heavy U.S. casualties. After this check, a more patient strategy of encirclement and investment was pursued. achieving success with the capture of the Fort de Koenigsmacker at Thionville on 12 November. In mid-November a renewed attack was launched by XII and XX Corps to envelop and eventually bypass Metz. The U.S. 95th Infantry Division was stationed immediately to the west of Metz, in the vicinity of Fort Jeanne d'Arc, and maintained contact while the 5th Infantry and other U.S. formations moved to the north and south. An assault was opened by the 95th Infantry on 14 November, concentrating on the interval between Fort Jeanne d'Arc and Fort François de Guise, which was occupied by a chain of smaller fortifications known as the "Seven Dwarves." American forces were able to penetrate to the Moselle by 18 November, leaving a force behind to contain the forts. In the meantime, the surviving remnants of the 462nd Volksgrenadier consolidated a defense at Fort Jeanne d'Arc. At the end of November, three forts were holding out and surrounded by the U.S. 2nd Infantry Division. The Metz forts were gradually reduced through December. Fort Jeanne d'Arc was the last to surrender on 13 December 1944, capitulating to the U.S. III Corps. Following the war, Fort Jeanne d'Arc was selected to become a NATO control center for air defense operations, manned by American, Canadian and French personnel. The site was designated the Moselle Common Area Control (MCAC), and provided air traffic control for a portion of Northeastern France and adjoining areas of Luxembourg and West Germany, along with approach control for four USAF bases as well as a flight plan service for RCAF Station Grostenquin. The facility occupied casernes 3 and 4, with the interior of Caserne 4 renovated to provide a two-level operations room. Work was largely financed by Canada, with a French contribution of 73 million francs. After France's withdrawal from the NATO integrated command structure in 1967, the center was operated solely by the French, finally abandoned in the late 1990s. Visited with @The_Raw , @extreme_ironing & @Maniac . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  8. Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. It is located between petit ouvrage Coucou and gros ouvrage Michelsberg, facing Germany. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. After modest renovations in the 1950s, Mont des Welches was abandoned in the 1970s. Mont des Welches was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in June 1930 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 49 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. The comparatively small gros ouvrage comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block, and two combination blocks. It lacks a central "M1" ammunition magazine, and unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of cross galleries between to main galleries, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment, commanded by Chef de Bataillon Tari. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  9. In the silos of the blast furnace Terre Rouge, iron ore and lime was stored, mixed and then burned in the blast furnaces. The gases were used to power the nearby thermal power plant "Central Thermique", which was built in 1951 and closed in 1997. The power plant is currently being demolished. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  10. Just a small chapel on the roadside. I don't know anything about the history. Visited with @The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  11. The infantry base Wolfsberg is a small part of the bigger fortress Kellermann, part of the "Group Fortification Lorraine". It was built in 1904 - 1906. Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  12. Ouvrage A28 is a smaller plant (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. The site was surveyed by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency; A28 was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 11 million francs by the contractor Duval-Weyrich of Nancy. The petit ouvrage was planned for construction in two phases. The second phase was to provide a separate entrance block a short distance to the rear. Heavy water infiltration required the provision of more extensive drainage work than originally planned. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 meters (98 ft). The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Captain Coste comprised 127 men and 2 officers of the 161st Fortress Infantry Regiment. A28 played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. A28 remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Visited with The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  13. In the former limestone mine a production for oxygen was shifted to the underground during World War II. Visited with The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  14. The fortress with a lot of murals in its bunkers is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and had its baptism of fire in late 1944, when the Battle of Metz occurred. The Fortification was part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. Covering an area of 83 ha, the Fortress is constructed from 1907 to 1914. The group fortification has 2 fortified barracks and can accommodate a total of 560 men. It has 8 pieces of artillery, 6 of them 100mm and 2 of them 77mm. It has eight domes and twenty observation points and lookouts. The various items are connected by 1,700m of underground galleries. In its water tanks, it has 2,640 m3 of water. The energy required for its operation is ensured by seven diesel engines of 27 hp each. During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz. In Second World War, on September 2, 1944, Metz is declared fortress Reich by Hitler. The fortress must be defended to the last by German troops. Visited with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and Maniac. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
  15. The Spa house was built within three years in the mid-20th century. It offered space for 100 beds and has an auditorium with 540 seats. Inside of the theater it was so dark that I had to expose about 2 minutes despite high ISO. The other rooms were empty or locked, so I took no pictures there. 1 2 3 4 5
  16. I'm sure you all know this place first hand, it was a very popular place and it's had a lot of Urbex traffic pass through it. Visited with Rusty on a Sheffield day trip back in September 2011 A real cool old place, I'm not sure of it's current status.
  17. Thought I'd post my old stuff up seeing as Nelly promised to post me a greggs pasty in return.
  18. On March 19th 2011, most of the world experienced a 'Supermoon' "A supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon or a new moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the moon's disk as seen from Earth" - Wiki Many of my friends from further North in the country said that on that night it was either raining or extemely cloudy but luckily for myself and King Al, the moon provided some extraordinary lighting effects and what better place than a local explore with some decent vantage points from which to photograph it. All of these shots were taken over the course of a couple of hours and required extremely long shutter speeds of up to 5 minutes, but are all straight off the camera with no tweaking other than rotation, resizing and cropping. Enjoy Fullers with a twist.... Mr. B
  19. Oldish report from November last year. Got caught by some contractors in here and they weren't best pleased. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats.
  20. A solo visit to a farm/manor house. I got seen eventually and gave a tall tale to the worker from the opposite farm. Thought I got away scott free, until the local police called my house phone and asked me what I was doing. Seems like that worker took the registration plate of my car. Idiot lol. Lots left behind, a beautiful house although I couldn't get into all the rooms and it was getting very very dark. Seems like the owner was also a painter! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  21. This place is fantastic, if slightly bare, but the architecture and space makes up for it!! It was once a nursing home, then a school, then a private manor house. If converted I think it will become a nursing home once again! Loved it here. not sure if converted yet! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  22. Probably the best manor house I've ever visited, and it's close to being one of the best locations I've been to...Simply amazing! Hope you like it. It has recently been sealed but I would love to go back. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  23. Visited with RJ & Shadow History can be found http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/d/draycott_cross_colliery/index2.shtml Looking deep into the tunnel, about half way down Compresser/pump of some sort...? 16 & 18 tubs, narrow gauge track in deep mud 28 tubs No road + 2 drill bits Looking up a small side air shaft Sand pilled to the roof and an earth mover Looking back towards the sand mound. metal hoops, many of which are now badly distorted. Pulley on the cable haulage system blocked adit Behind blocked off adits Looking down to the flooded adit Some of my other photo's can be viewed http://s68.beta.photobucket.com/user/Zoot337/library/Urbex/Dray Thanks for looking