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Found 43 results

  1. History In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire... The present building was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth assisted by James Moyser to replace the earlier hall. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carrin 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The hall housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds from 2001 to 2007. Explore Work began on site in march 2016... The MüllerVanTol studio has been appointed to design the interiors of the Grade II listed mansion and the refurbishment of other listed buildings is well underway. Most of the 11 student dwellings which were built in the 1960's and 1970's have been demolished including Eglinton, Litherop, Swithen and Haigh, Grasshopper will be the last to go in late 2017. A real shame considering the position of the college which specialised in design, drama, music and other performing arts with notable alumna attending. The Hall itself resides in 500 acres of park land which is home to the Yorkshire Sculpture park (YSP). (YSP) was the first of it's kind within the UK and his the largest in Europe, providing the only the place to see Barbara Hepworth and Bronzes by Henry Moore. Over 300,000 visitors are said to visit the park each year and on previous visits its been easy to blend into the crowd and walk around the exterior of the old Hall this said access internally as always been restricted. Access to the Hall today is strictly prohibited and is protected by 6ft metal fencing which spans the entire grounds including former classrooms and the stable block and more so their is a high presence of security on site with the developers keen to keep the public away. Recently signs have appeared to restrict the public taking pictures near the Hall itself... typical signs read (restricted use of photography in this area). The developers seem to be going to extreme lengths to protect the design ideas of the Hall and are passing these restriction onto local media and staff working onsite... I'm guessing the developers are wanting to keep their plans secret until the grand opening later in 2019. During the festive Holiday period we decided to pay a visit... making our way to some of the former classrooms and the student centre. This led to the stable block passing by the former dwellings and down to the main hall. We were surprised to have got this far and would have been more than happy with some nice externals of the buildings on site. YSP was very quiet and we were aware of sticking out in the surroundings so decided to head inside. Making our way down to the hall we were sure we would be found before we had chance to pull out our cameras. We were quite taken away by the sheer scope of the refurbishment and the beautiful restoration work been carried out we soon forgot about the threats of been in the Hall. Slowly documenting our visit and proceeding through the Halls rooms we became aware our explore light could be attracting unwanted attention from the outside as daylight was running out. Turning it off where possible it was obvious that it would be shining like a beacon through the Halls many rooms, we decided to head out with the premise of returning in the morning. Unfortunately on our return we were met by the security who TBH was sympathetic in escorting us off the premises. It seems like our well documented day at Bretton Hall was a one off and maybe we will have to wait to see how the restoration unfolds when the Hall is reborn as an hotel. Pics 1. Entrance Arcade belonging to former stable block (circa 1800). 2. Beaumont Bull & Wentworth Griffin above the columns on each side of the archway below the cupola. 3. Lost student art outside the experimental theatre... former carriage house 4. Looking down the Colonnade 5. The stable courtyard 6. The south range of Bretton hall dates back to 1720 9. Giant pilasters supporting the pendent at the north range of Bretton Hall 8. Three storey nine-by-five-bay main range. 9. Pathway leading to the exterior of the former library 10. Former Orangery 11. Plaque detailing the history 12. Former dinning room with marble fireplace 13. Typical Rococo style in the former dining room 14. Typically their would have been a frieze around the fireplace 15. Looking up at the glazed dome 16. Looks like restoration as begun on the pendentives 17. Former drawing room with its spectacular baroque ceiling 18. Close a look at the baroque ceiling 19. Originally Regency Library then later converted to a display room. 21. Left overs from the colleague era 22. looks like works yet to begin in this area of the hall 23. Leading back to the library 24. restoration of the cove Acoustics to amplify sound in the music room 25. Light hanging from the Adam style celling 26. South ranges main staircase 27. Main staircase with a wrought iron railing 28. Stone stairs leading down to the basement 29. A form of art nouveau 30. Inside the main range 31. Coving shelves 32. Beautiful example of a transom window 33. Mid - century scandinavian style chair 34. Adam style celling's from 1770 35. Developer keeping with the original sash windows 36. Groin vaulted passage with three arches and piers decorated with grisaille paintings in the Portico Hall Added buildings from the former college days 37. The gymnasium 38. exterior of former classrooms 39. Former student centre reception 40. Corridoor leading to the classrooms 41. The student centre was empty 42. Damaged computer 43. Locked 44. typical student dormitory 45. recreational room 46. Entrance to one of the very few remaining former dormitory buildings The history of the Bretton Hall could be a thread all on its own ... as could the documentation of the architecture its position as educational faculty and importantly the future usage of the Hall as an entertainment venue. I've done my best to condense this were possible and in doing so have provided a comprehensive report regarding Bretton Hall.. Hope you enjoyed the report
  2. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  3. History W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. Our Version of Events Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward. Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  4. Ok, first post on here, so hope you enjoy. Just a small explore from middle of last year but an interesting little one one nonetheless. The Royal Victoria closed bit by bit over the last few years, finally becoming empty last year. Each time we pitched up there was always something still active so we accidentally left it a bit too long without checking. Big mistake, the neds burnt half the place to the ground and a sh!tload was demod to make it safe. Anyway, we managed to explore a good but of it but only took photos of the main block. The old Victorian building despite looking externally brilliant - has been so modernised inside there is no hall anymore - just a bunch of admin rooms. Enough babbling - on with the pics Main Entrance _DSC2237 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Inside the Main Entrance _DSC2229 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Staircase _DSC2228 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Sink anyone? _DSC2227 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward _DSC2224 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spotless Ward _DSC2222 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spine Corridor _DSC2221 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Mural _DSC2216 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Bed _DSC2214 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Smashed Ward and Bed _DSC2205 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External _DSC2239 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  5. Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser. Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers. Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates. The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. . . Thanks for Looking All the best for the New Year More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/
  6. This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  7. After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  8. Nipped in here after G.B's last February. Not much to see building wise but there is some nice graffiti knocking about. I have seen some more recent reports and the graffiti has changed in parts now. Some for the better some not. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the English city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, horse-drawn, opened in 1873 between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe, subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built,Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910 the network covered 39 miles, by 1951 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street to Beauchief and Tinsley on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. . . . . This one was outside Cannons Brewery on the same day. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680624533806/with/33051734346/
  9. One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  10. A bit of a revisit to see if anything had changed since my last visit in 2014 Well worth a look if your passing. Some History The Culvert in Ebbw Vale is along the River Ebbw Fawr, a stretch of just over a mile of the river was Culverted in 1937 to accommodate expansion of the steel works. The tunnel was originally a brick lined concrete arch for its entire length. In places it has raised walkways on either side, it is well documented that someone died in this Culvert from touching a live wire that some metal thieves had cut some years ago. Pics Thanks for looking
  11. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  12. The History Largely from wiki: Millmoor was was the home ground of Rotherham County F.C. between 1907 and 1925 and then their successors Rotherham United F.C. until 2008. The team and ground were once owned by C.F. Booth, whose huge Clarence Metalworks and scrapyard overlooks the site. When Ken Booth sold the club in 2004 he kept the freehold to the stadium and leased it back to the club in return for £200,000 a year rent and preferential advertising options and ticket allocations. In 2008 the relationship between the two parties broke down and Rotherham United left Millmoor for the Don Valley Stadium, before moving into their present ground, the New York Stadium, in 2012. The Explore All in all a pretty relaxed mooch. The scrapyard next door is huge and noisy but everybody is too busy to be paying much attention to the stadium. All of the internal areas of the ground are heavily stripped but in good condition, with the custody suite and cells being particularly interesting. The stands are in fairly good condition and the pitch itself appears to be maintained with Wiki suggesting it's seen periodic use for youth football. Being the genius that I am I left everything but a 35mm prime lens at home and arrived about 40 minutes before sunset so apologies for the slightly odd perspectives. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  13. Whats This a report from me NOOOOOO Wayyyy lol. Sorry aint been upping much hopefully that will change. Anyways i know a few been here etc but thought i would up mine. History: Not much im afraid and i aint copying anyone else. What i do know is a pub/club was underneath and its been up for sale quite a bit. Also it has some lovely terracotta walls etc . Explore: Visited on a invite from @GRONK after a little look with @stranton and mentioned it to gronk has it could be worth a visit has me and strant didn't get time. And even though a lot is trashed a lot was deffo worth the trip. And getting in well it was more open than some of the ladies of the night i have seen in both Leeds and Sheffield lol. A big difference from when me and strant went. Anyways on with what you want to see the pics. so enjoy all. A few shots from bar area .. Dont forget your coat lol.. Now my fave bits .. @GRONK getting in my shot lol The smell in here ffs was unreal. #URBEXPOO lol Ok thats it for now enjoy sll. Will deffo try to get some more done. If not before crimbo have a cracking Christmas all and a urbex filled 2018 for all. Thanks for looking.....
  14. Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics.. Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook. Owners and tenants of the mills have included James Nutton & Company [1863] John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896] F. K. Adcock & Company [1936] Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used. The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992 The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017. The mill by Lavino lavino[/ The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  15. This place has been on the radar for a while now but never got the chance to properly take a look. The dome itself can be seen for quite a few miles across the surrounding areas. Not a great deal of information available other than it looks like some sort of water treatment site/reservoir possibly used by the MOD, given the land its situated on. It doesn't appear to be fully derelict either as you can still here the sound of running water and the grass seems to be trimmed. The explore went as planned, few dog walkers here and there, other than that spent a little while looking around.
  16. Explore of the year 2017

    So now is the time you start seeing this type of thread pop up. Favourite cereals, dog walking moments, cheesey tunes etc... Favourite derp should have its place For me, this is pretty easy. After a while out of exploring I finally got my feet the taste of mould and pigeon shit they had so desperately been craving. I got out once, nothing crazy, but it was out. A cash and carry in Leicester.
  17. Visited recently on my first foray over to the European side of life (can't believe it has taken so long). It was excellent / cold in the snow! History: On May 9, 1899, Kaiser Wilhelm II laid the first stone of Fort St. Blaise. Group Fortification Verdun group is built on top of two hills, it consists of two forts, the fort Sommy 30 ha in the south, and Fort Saint-Blaise 45 ha on the north. Group Fortification Verdun has four 150mm howitzers and six short 100mm guns. Fort St. Blaise was planned for 500 men and fort Sommy for 200 men. It could then receive two infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. St. Blaise, whose fortified barracks could receive 500 people, has 10 observation domes and 12 lookout posts.[4] The water tank's capacity was 1,300 m. 4 diesel engines of 25HP each, providing the energy necessary for Fort St. Blaise. The fort Sommy, including the fortified barracks, could accommodate 200 people, and has 6 observation domes and 8 lookouts. Its water tank could hold 600 m and it had 3 diesel engines of 20HP each, to provide the energy needed for its operation.[4] The coat of arms of Count of Haeseler is carved on the pediment of the door of the fort. It caused the Americans a huge headache in WW2 and proved its worth as a fortified location. Patton underestimated their strength immensely. Fort St. Blaise: The first of the two forts, complete with short 100mm funs in place showing battle damage. Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Collapsed structure / battle damage Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr The thing you don't realise until you get there is that the French Army have not removed any of the barbed wire entanglements, complete with foot spikes and in some places, unexploded ordnance Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Fort Sommy: The smaller outer fort, with a machine gun cupola and two turrets with guns and a tonne more battle damage, with craters and wall collapses all over the shop! Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr
  18. Germany Beelitz Heilstatten (okt 2017)

    1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: A legal visit during a photo base on 21-10-2017. Felt like a last chance because renovation is being prepared. We could notice the painting done during the filming of 'a cure for wellness' very well since we did the bathhouse an men's complex illegal in 2016. Still an impressive location of course and the photo's won't be much of a surprise i guess. I already had a fascination for abandoned buildings, but my first visit at Beelitz Heilstatten in 2014 really kicked of my passion for photography of the abandoned world. Hope you enjoyed viewing this thread! grts, Peter
  19. Another visit from October with @Andy, @Maniacand@extreme_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there. Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s. Bon journée
  20. This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz. Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy. "Flourish German fatherland" "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree" "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....) "Beautiful is the recruit life" "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it" "May God punish England" Thanks for looking y'all
  21. UK Pool Manor-November 2017

    After discovering this place, reading a news article I decided to take a look. Theres not a great deal of history on this place other than the fact it was used as a home for ww2 soldiers after coming back from war. It's been home to several owners of the years however the place has fallen into disrepair. The manor is currently up for sale. The explore itself went really well, after making our way through the grounds and finding an entrance, we were greeted with a stunning pool, with paintings on every wall. As we moved further on we found a sauna, bar, a superb inside courtyard, a huge basement complete with model railway and what looked like a full size tank made of wood, whoever previously lived in the manor was clearly very creative... The vast majority of rooms have Been emptied out however a few furnishings still remain. We made our way onto the roof when we noticed a man walking down the drive towards the manor, we noticed him walk around checking through the windows before leaving again. Must have been looking after the place and making sure nothing was damaged. We didn't get caught however so that's a bonus! Since then we have been back however our original entrance had been sealed back up. PHOTOS: https://500px.com/serenity4urbex/galleries/pool-manor
  22. Had a look at this place while in the area back in March. The cars where the main attraction for me and they did not disappoint. Excellent examples of cars left to rust and rot until they finally fall in on themselves. The rest of the site consists of stripped huts with some being more interesting and less bear than others. A relaxed and pleasant half hour. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Known as Prisoner of war camp 116 was built in 1941 and located in Hatfield heath, just outside Bishops Stortford. The camp mainly housed Italians until about 1943-1944 where it held German and Austrian prisoners aswell. It was known at one point the camp housed 750 prisoners The prisoners had a relatively easy lifestyle here (Unlike the English prisoners in the German POW Camps) and could do voluntary work in the near by farm land in Harlow, they were picked up by the Land Girls and each prisoner had an allotted farm where they would work at. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157678466406434/with/32853941973/
  23. Quite a big place this one with some great decay throughout. Spent a good few hours round here enjoying a relaxed explore. Some parts of the building are worse than others .There has also been some vandalism and shit graff left behind. Not enough to spoil the over all feel of the place though. And like I said, the decay is awesome. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Our Lady’s Hospital first opened its doors in 1868 and was then known as Ennis District Lunatic Asylum. For 134 years it continued to operate on the same site as a mental hospital and indeed until the 1950s very little changed in the manner in which it was run. The hospital was one of the largest public buildings in County Clare and was both a large employer and purchaser of goods from local suppliers.It played an important role in the economic life of Ennis, especially in earlier years when jobs were scarce and pensionable positions were highly prized. Wards were very overcrowded with up to 70 beds per room, with only inches between. It closed in 2002 and there are currently no plans for its development. . . . . . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157662358523548/with/37531708144/
  24. I was not really sure what to expect from this place. It turned out to be a huge industrial playground with loads to have a look at. The size of this spot is awesome and I could not have asked for a better place to give my wide angle lens it's first outing. The workshops where another nice section in here. Some nice old machinery left to see. I really enjoyable explore this one and having a wide angle with me was a great bonus. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Pilkingtons was founded in 1826 as a partnership between members of the Pilkington and Greenall families, based in St Helens, Lancashire. It was originally named Greenall and Pilkington up until 1849. On the departure from the partnership of the last Greenall in 1845, the firm became known as Pilkington Brothers. The Kirk Sandall site came into existence in the early 1920's when the firm looked to establish another site in the UK. Kirk Sandall was an ideal situation. Its excellent waterway and railway facilities were conveniently sited, especially since the Great Central Railway Company had doubled its line in the area. After 76 year producing glass, the factory finally closed its doors in 2008. Not much has changed since it closed, most of it has remained abandoned but some of the site is used by Trackwork for training and storage. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157684315511034/with/35460637944/
  25. This is a spectacular location for sure, surrounded by wonderful dramatic coastline. If you've got time I'd recommend bringing a packed lunch!! You could be watching the waves crash against the rugged cliffs, maybe if you're lucky you might spot a seal or a puffin passing by. Here in 1951 plans were set up to build a plant which would extract bromine from sea water and by adding sulphuric acid would then create liquid bromine. The bromine was then reacted with ethylene to produce Dibromoethane which was a key component of leaded petrol. With the phasing out of leaded petrol in the 1990's the plant diversified into other bromine chemicals. Production finally stopped altogether in March 2004. Many of the buildings have been demolished but there was enough standing to make this high on my wish list - plenty of natural decay and lots of interesting stuff left on site. Its been fairly undisturbed due to a combination of its remote location, CCTV and onsite security. Sadly though a recent fire has badly damaged one of the buildings (not quite sure which one). The photos in this report are a compilation. I had to make a return visit because the first time I somehow missed the conference room and the main attraction for me - the medical area. I really like how much variety there is, hence why there's quite a few pics
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