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Found 13 results

  1. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  2. Our original plan was to spend Christmas here but weather forecasts were dire and we didn't want to die a watery death so we binned the idea off and went to Wales instead! Planning our summer road trip and this place cropped up again and it was game on! We'd do the island before heading off to foreign lands for a couple of weeks. After spending the previous night watching an awesome lightning storm we were hoping for good weather! Waking up a few hours later in the back of the limo to see rain I snuggled back into my sleeping bag and went back to sleep. When I next awoke the sky was grey and it was drizzly, and with an uncertain forecast we decided to check out a few alternative locations instead. A few fails and some epic jungleering through the undergrowth later, the sun decided to come out and we bit the bullet and decided Operation Island Infiltration was back on! A few hours later and we were busy unloading gear (lots and lots and lots of gear) by the sea and Riddlers was busy blowing up his dingy ready to take us out! There appeared to be quite a bit of interest in our little escapade but throwing caution to the wind the first three intrepid explorers set sail and it wasn't long before all 7 of us were safely on dry land. We set up camp and then went for a bit of an explore, its a lovely little place with lots to see and I proper enjoyed just mooching about whilst the boys played with the cannons and drank beer. We had fire and food before heading to bed for an early night, the Merry Prankster set up his projector and fell asleep to South Park, The Riddlers got shouted at for playing shit music and keeping people awake and me and Jobs had a hammock fail and ended up on the floor! In the morning we were getting ready to leave but when we looked out across the water it was bedlam, the police boat, RNLI and Lifeguards were out in force, initially thinking we had been spotted we awaited their arrival, but much to our bemusement they appeared to be clearing the harbour!! A quick google later and we discovered there was an airshow just about to start and for safety reasons they were clearing the public from underneath the display area. Well almost all the people, we had the choice seats directly underneath as bi-planes looped and dipped across the skies, dropping low enough for them to see us and give us a friendly wave as they passed by! After enjoying the show we got ready to leave, with The Riddlers at the helm, Bigjobs and Motionless Escape were the first to go. We watched them bobbing across the waves until we saw them land but an age passed and there was no sign of them returning. One phone call later and we discovered a pin had broken on the boat and they were frantically trying to fix it. So with visions of having to be rescued by the Lifeguards we waited and waited and waited, then boom across the harbour we spotted him! THey'd fixed the boat and The Riddlers was making his way back Not long after we were back on dry land chattering like excitable children on a school trip planning our next stop! History Located in the heart of the harbour lies Drake Island. The island was originally called St Nicholas' Island and later St Michael's Island before it was renamed and dedicated to Sir Francis Drake in the late Tudor period. Originally is accommodated an artillery battery, this was followed by a larger garrison and during the Civil War, the Island played a key role in the defence of Plymouth against Royalist Attack. In the mid-sixteenth century, the first fortification was commissioned as a result of the war with France. A stone and turf wall built and a garrison was installed in 1551. In 1580 a disagreement between the people of Plymouth and the Government over who had responsibility for paying for the defence it was taken into state ownership. By 1590s a garrison of 100 men and 40-50 guns were installed, increasing further as the war with Spain continued. After the restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War, the island was used as a prison for notable Parliamentary prisoners. Major General John Lambert, the successor to Oliver Cromwell, was held here from 1670-84. Also incarcerated here was Colonel Robert Lilburn, one of the regicides. The defences visible today mainly date from the mid-nineteenth century when the large casemates were constructed complete with supporting magazines and accommodation. Finally, the Island was garrisoned by just under 500 soldiers for much of WWII supporting coastal defence and anti-air operations. In 1963 Plymouth Council obtained a lease from the Crown and a youth centre was opened in 1964, coming under the custody of the Mayflower Trust until they surrendered the lease in 1989. The Island was bought by Dan McCauley in 1995 with a view to building a hotel and helipad. Initial plans were rejected due to the nesting egrets on the Island but as of April 2017 a further plan has been submitted with protection plans in place and work is expected to start in the not too distant future. Hope you enjoyed looking
  3. Germany Bauernhaus S. - 2017

    One of only a few of my discoveries which I have exclusive (at least I didn't find any pictures on the www). I spotted this small farmhouse a few years ago on one of my rides but unfortunately there was no way inside. But happily I decided to keep in mind. This year I detected an open window. Have been in there twice since. #1 DSC09261-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09282-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09283-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09314-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09268-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09266-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09311-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09267-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09269-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09312-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09285-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC09273-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09274-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09292-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC09295-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09278-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC09275-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC09302-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC09276-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC09277-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC09299-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC09304-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC09281-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC09272-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC09271-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC09307-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  4. So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with. It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!.... The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140. The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining. Anyway here are a few pics Thanks for looking
  5. Crank Caverns have been on my radar for a while, with its mythical history of child eating dwarves, oddly shaped body bags, cannibalism and a hidden chapel who wouldn't want to go and take a look? With a history like that, we decided to brave the night and risk life and limb to go in search of the evil creatures of the caverns. Meeting up with some friends we scurried through the dark to the edge of the woods. Wondering what awaited us we made our way through the trees to the cavern entrance, listening out for the scurry of tiny angry dwarf feet! Much to our disappointment, we heard no such thing so made our way in! It was a little damp and muddy in places but We explored every nook and cranny possible, with one of the lads crawling through some that weren't even possible! He is like a crawly ninja of small holes and gaps that do not exist! Despite our extensive searching, we didn't come across any dwarves or a single human bone and with no evidence of a secret church we called it a night and went our separate ways. Was a fun night out with a cracking bunch of people History Sandstone quarrying began here as early as 1730. As the quarry expanded, the cost of purchasing land to open cast mine it increased, so it was decided to opt for a different method. Instead of quarrying out the stone, they would mine it out, following a seam of stone until it ran out. This resulted in the network of caves, tunnels and shafts we see today. Rainford Delph is listed as a Colliery by 1854, under the ownership of Charles Howarth or Yorkshire Charlie as he was known locally by 1880. Mining finally ceased and the woods and caverns were used as a game reserve by the Earl of Derby until 1939 when they became a storage facility for ammunition for the anti-aircraft position at Crank. After the war, the caverns ceased use as a game reserve. Myths and Legends Child Eating Dwarves "Vicious dwarves" were once rumoured to inhabit the labyrinth of caverns in Crank. In the late 18th century four children decided to explore the sandstone caverns and vanished. One child survived and told a terrifying tale about small old men with beards, who talked in an unknown language, they killed his three friends and chased him. The petrified child stumbled over human bones in the caves and finally managed to scramble through an opening to the surface as a hand was grabbing at his ankle. The authorities became concerned because a number of people had gone missing in the area near the cave entrances and apparently they sent in the army to install gates and bars. It is apparently undecided if this was to keep people out or keep something in. Oddly shaped body bags Apparently about 17 or 18 years ago two young lads entered the caverns and got lost, they had told their parents where they were going and when they didn’t arrive home their parents informed the police. After a couple of days searching the police sealed off the area and removed to body bags from the caverns. This is where it gets strange, they were also reported to have removed 7 more body bags from the caverns, one of the bags was said to have not been in a body shape but was square. Cannibalism There is a story about some scouts who went down the caverns for a look around and at the end of the day one of the scouts had not come back out. Eventually, they called out Cave Rescue to try and find the boy. After a long search they found him or what was left of him, allegedly the boy was partly eaten. The parents of the child wanted it all kept secret so the press didn't get hold of the story and they could give their son a peaceful send-off. Another story tells of a child's head found in a cave, along with evidence of cannibalism. After a second investigation, the caves either collapsed or gunpowder was used to seal them. Church Cavern Two heavily armed soldiers descended into the caverns with torches and claimed that they not only found a heap of human bones, they also found the ruins of an ancient church of some unknown denomination. The interior of the church was lit by three large candles and grotesque gargoyles formed part of an altar. Throughout the exploration of the underground, the soldiers said they felt as if they were being watched, and also heard voices speaking in an unknown language. Anyway enough of this rubbish here's a few pics to look at instead...... Thanks for looking
  6. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  7. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  8. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  9. History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  10. The chateau is one of the many large abandoned houses that can be found around France. Built in the 1700s by the lord of the village it is within, the house has been modified and expanded over the years. The vaulted basement contains a full size snooker table below the original arched ceiling. A large stone fireplace is the centre-point of a sitting area to one end of the basement. The front entrance opens directly to a small stone staircase, leading up to the main living areas which are slightly raised from ground level, or down to the basement. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  11. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  12. Moreton in the Marsh District Hospital - September 2017 Visited a few weeks ago with Mookster and two other non-members for one of their bithdays. It was a very relaxed explore as you'd expect; pretty trashed and stripped of most things, but still retained some photographic merit. We were caught on the way out by a friendly and incredibly confused security guard who didn't really have an awful lot to say and just smiled a lot! Moreton-in-Marsh Cottage Hospital was a small Victorian hospital built in the Cotswolds. It's closure in 2012 came about after a new much larger facility opened just outside the village. Moreton Cottage Hospital was built in 1873 by private subscription. Lord Redesdale gave the land at the north end of the town in Back Ends. The first small stone building had seven beds, but this was extended in 1879 following a £3,000 request by Dr. William Sands Cox, the founder of Queen's College, Birmingham. In 1886 The Joseph Phipps Charity donated a further £1,000 stock to the hospital in and an operating theatre was built in 1900. By 1919 the hospital was extended further, when £2,000 was given to the hospital, and again in 1935. Moreton in the Marsh Cottage Hospital; which had been managed by trustees, eventually came under the authority of the Banbury and District Hospital Management Committee after 1946. There are a several buildings within the site, the main hospital and a much more modernised outpatients clinic. After the hospitals closure, bits of the hospital have been used by a prop hire company as storage but now the whole site remains disused. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157686204703971
  13. I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson. As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun. I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust. The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site. Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
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