Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '2018'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Off topic & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 24 results

  1. Dawson fabrics ltd The history Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recentley been re-subbmitted with agreed amendments. The explore This has taken some documenting. We have had everything from Alarms to some very sketchy Security (with authentic teeth missing)... chased around the Mill by guard dogs and the local mechanic filming us through one of the Mill's windows then giving chase up the driveway. But paying frequent visits we are now confident we have documented every part of the Mill. Starting in early 2013 we decided to take a look. Having been denied the first time we were persistent and on returning a further 6/7 times managed to start with some of the Mills out buildings. The repair workshop Typical tools left over which would have been used to repair various pieces of equipment in order to keep the Mill running... we were surprised to see so many of the original materials left behind perhaps not dissimilar to the day it closed albeit with a little more rust. I suppose when your out on an explore like this you know you've hit the jackpot when theres machinery of this nature untouched from vandals or travellers. The roof Offers reprieve when Charlie the guard dog is on the rampage.. The boiler house One of the tricker out buildings to reach which took some careful manoeuvring to enter... The boiler house was a considerable size and housed some pretty impressive pieces of metal. There were quite a few boilers scattered around and we did mange to document a very old looking although perfectly immaculate Ruston & Hornsby boiler... which if we had the time to persevere with the controls would have provided some much needed warmth on the explore. Climbing the boiler The main factory Block A This building forms most of the internal workings of the Mill with huge generators lining the corridor. on previous explores we would have been more than happy with this has the main attraction... It was a little like looking around a museum and we wouldn't have been surprised if a guide had popped out and started talking about how the machinery was used to produce some of the garments. It was one of those buildings that if you had more time you could easily spend hours working out what pieces of equipment do what... maybe a guide wouldn't have been so bad. Block B What we thought was the processing area turned out to be a little more interesting... on entering there was typical garments stored in corridors.. filing cabinets etc. Making our way around we came to what appeared to be a Lab most probably used to test out dye's for the Mill's fabric. There was some wonderful looking pieces of apparatus that wouldn't look out of place on the starship enterprise. we were so tempted to start them up but again time was against us... In the basement we came across a kitchen area which was a little unusual as the main canteen area was in a different location of the site. Block C Separate from the main Mill apart from the adjoining conveyer belt is the substantial finishing area... where guessing that this is where production was finished with garments ready to pack for distribution. standard apparatus consisted of looms ... drums filled with dye ... retro looking PC's and a general supervisors office. natural decay slowly taking over the various leftovers. Supervisors office block C The admin office Beautifully presented and part of the Mills original build was this very well preserved admin block... we felt like we had stepped back into the 1950's with this one all that was missing was a typewriter with someone busy working away whilst smoking an old pipe. Original oak wood entry which expanded to the stairs and the facade. Searching further we came across what looked like a board room i suppose some important decisions will have been made hear over the years and most recently the current owners rubbing their hands in what potentially will make them millions if plans are approved for the demolishment of the site to make way for a housing estate. We've had it all with this explore... a beautiful preserved Mill dating way back. some very heart thumping games of hide and seek... very loud alarms... and a lovely guard dog barking incessantly whilst on site... we even got embroiled with the RSPCA and locals concerned about the health and safety of the guard dog. we're a little reluctant to put this out as the identity of the Mill will probably be compromised... I think though the old girls years are numbered and it won't be long before another part of our history is noted in text form whilst making way for another faceless housing estate. That concludes the explore...
  2. Was reminded that I didn't posted anything yet so, here's a post of a recent visit to this mine. This one is not the safest one :-) . Some parts are already collapsed. There are several levels but the lower did we skip. Heard that the air quality is not the best there and we didn't bring the rope ladder . Was nice to explore. Hope you enjoy looking at this.
  3. Explore This was a fairly easy explore as these buildings are not as protected as the main college and the park relies on tourists to inform security about any vandals. The gymnasium was the hardest to get into as we had to avoid getting seen by any onlookers. So going at a later time of day would be advised. You should be cautious if you get further into the student centre as some of the doors looked to be alarmed. The classrooms are in the open and not surrounded by anything so you are likely to be spotted by security or tourists. We had a run in with security who were quite well mannered and laid back. All they said was that we were not to go near the building as it is a demolition site. Explored with @little_boy_explores History Student Centre I can't believe they left this in the open Gymnasium We didn't need to this door Classrooms
  4. UK Pagefield Mill - Wigan - 2018

    The beautiful post-apocalyptic page field mill - Video Report
  5. UK Coronation Street 2018 - Old Granada Studios

    A post-apocalyptic look into Granada Studios old coronation street set! I felt I had to do this one considering I am a Mancunian and all, but sometimes these expeditions don't always go to plan.
  6. UK The Cold Slabs - Jan 2018

    Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
  7. The Jordanhill Campus is an historic estate within the boundaries of Jordanhill in Glasgow, Scotland. The buildings have stood empty since 2012, until which time it served as the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. Sometimes you just can't understand why no one else has posted a report. This is one of those places! Initially @The Amateur Wanderer and I had a look around the place during our Christmas trip to Scotland, and then I returned a short while later with @SpiderMonkey. We only looked around one building, the David Stow Building which is the main attraction, the original and oldest part of the site. There is also a huge 1960s concrete extension behind, but the sooner that gets pulled down the better - we didn't bother with it! History The buildings date back to 1837 when former merchant and educational pioneer David Stow opened the Dundas Vale Normal Seminary, Europe’s first purpose-built training institution for teachers. Some remnants of the old seminary still remain today – rooms with rows of sinks which were more recently used as storage, and wooden lockers can still be found. In 1913 the Glasgow Corporation agreed a deal to buy the estate, and build both a teacher training college and the associated Jordanhill School on the site. A new building was planned to provide teacher training. With the new school completed in 1920 and the college in 1921, the now Grade B listed David Stow Building facilitated all teacher training provided under the unified University of Glasgow. Centrally funded and with no ties with churches, the college was largely non-residential and its range of work was wider. A shortage of teachers throughout Britain in the late 1950s lead to large scale expansion at Jordanhill. Construction of a new purpose-built facility commenced in 1961, replacing a much older manor house on the site. In 1993, the college was required to merge with a higher education facility. The University of Strathclyde approached the college, and an agreement between both institutions was reached. In 1993 Jordanhill College became the Faculty of Education of the University of Strathclyde. With better use of facilities, and an ageing campus at Jordanhill which was highly protected by preservation orders, in 2010 the decision was made to close Jordanhill campus and move the Faculty all courses to its John Anderson Campus. 2011-12 was the last academic year held at the Jordanhill Campus before the move took place. David Stow Building - Entrance Hall Francis Tombs Hall Staircases and Corridors Teaching rooms and facilities Other areas Hidden Relics There were a few areas around the building that hadn’t been refurbished and contained relics from older uses...
  8. We visited St John's Hospital in Lincolnshire on Sunday, here is our video. Although we were told the security at the hospital was extremely tight we didn't actually come across any security at all! They must have been having a day off lol.
  9. Poland Resort - Poland, 2018

    One of the objects located in the campsite. Why a house is bad. When I was inside, alone ... there was a squeaky door from everywhere and the cracking of the boards against each other. The blame for all this is borne by the wind and frost ... however, when you sit in such an object yourself, different thoughts come to mind. In fact, I was not alone ... my friend was outside ... but the distance between us (at a given moment and situation) was comparable to the width of the Vistula (in fact it was enough to just walk out the window). Great property, amazing atmosphere ... great rooms .... (Translator...sorry)
  10. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  11. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  12. This development is about half an hour from my home in Sharm..never realised it was totally abandoned so only had a look round the outsides but I will return...bit of history for yous: A most ambitious hotel this..a former Five star hotel complex comprising of three hotels,Moon,Star and Sun.Raouf gifted this hotel to his american wife who managed and used her artistic touch to decorate the place.The complex comprised a dozen pools,a casino and cinemas,however,there seemed initially that the business was a success but bookings dropped off and eventually the Moon hotel closed followed by Star then the Sun..now,the beach lies abandoned with parasol umbrellas and sunbeds piled up near a beach bar and the entire complex is now abandoned..even the locals give it a wide berth for some strange reason. Only a few pics of interest so....this is the state of the beach No longer busy Pool bar with quite a view. This water ride ran between two hotels Pretty impressive pool Massage anyone? If nothing else,I have brought a few sunny pics to your shore!
  13. It looks as if someone closed the cinema yesterday after the screening ... cinema room untouched ... projectors in their place, ready to work ... amazing atmosphere.
  14. Poland Civil defense - Poland 2018

    It is a civil defense hall in a large plant that remembers the times of the Polish People's Republic... it was rather ... because the plant liquidated the room In the event of an armed attack, it would protect the civilian population. The room is falling apart. The equipment is rotting. Nobody cares about it anymore. Fortunately, at the last moment I got a tip and I was able to visit and take pictures. Some of the pictures are directed, but only so I could show the entire contents of this room. Translated in a translator
  15. Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  16. UK Eastry Workhouse Jan 2018

    Recent video of the beautiful example of what was the workhouse and Infirmary. On our first visit the seclusion rooms where visible now reduced to rubble.
  17. Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  18. Former puppy farm that was often in the local news regarding poor living quarters,alleged mistreatment of dogs and the selling of dogs that often died after new owners took delivery of the young animals..the RSPCA were always closing down the business,but the owner John Lowe simply ignored them and carried on. On February 23rd 2014,Mr Lowe,who purchased Keepers Cottage in 1966,shot and killed his partner and then her daughter,who tried to flee and get help,but died just outside the cottage.Police arrived and arrested Mr Lowe who was found guilty of double murder later that year and jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 25 years so it is likely he will die in prison.From information on several estate agents websites,it seems the 6 acre estate has been sold but last year planning permission was refused for one plan to demolish the cottage and build 3 dwellings so as of January 2018,I have no idea what will happen.We arrived at dawn and immediately noticed red flashing cameras mounted firstly at the gated entrance then further down the track mounted on a telegraph pole and one fixed on the cottage all flashing busily.We were considering retreating however we decided to skirt round the outbuildings to escape the cameras if indeed that is what they are and not dummy alarms which I suspect they are...I have to say I found this explore both intriguing but disturbing at the same time and was glad to leave..I have not felt this way since exploring Cane Hill Asylum in 2008. My pics are only phone shots so please excuse.. Found this on Google Earth to show how haphazard this place is/was We arrive as the sun is filtering through the trees..this cottage sits within a six acre plot nicely hidden by the woods. The farm is surrounded by shanty type buildings largely held together with telegraph poles. Truly awful animal pens..I cannot imagine this was any better before the old man`s conviction. We skirt round the rear of the house avoiding the cameras Amphitheatre style seating/steps. Living room..very surprised to see that this fire place didnt seem to have been used for open fires. View from the master bedroom. And the enormous conservatory built round two elevations. I am glad I saw all this but upon exiting the house,some strange bleeping noise started so it was our excuse to leave!
  19. The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  20. The old Coronation Street Film set is currently sat, abandoned , waiting demolition. This video shows an explore of the purpose built film set at Granada Studios in Manchester. Although this wasn't the very first film set at the studio it's one of the most well known and remembered amongst fans of the popular soap. The TV show's production was filmed at this location for over 30 years until it was sold to Manchester Quays Its in 2013 to be demolished and replaced with flats, offices, restaurants and hotels.
  21. Another local one that I've been wanting to do for ages, but never got round to it until now. It's filled full of asbestos, so I made sure to bring my good PP3 mask, but even that wasn't enough probably. History During World War 2, the Southern Railway took over the Deepdene Hotel near Dorking in Surrey for its wartime emergency headquarters. In the grounds they excavated an underground control centre taking advantage of a network of existing natural caves that had been acknowledged 300 years before in the diaries of John Evelyn. Because of the natural protection afforded by the location of the caves they were eminently suitable for the development of a bunker to house both the headquarters' telephone exchange and Traffic Control who also had their underground control centre there with underground divisional controls at Woking (South West Division), Southampton (Western Division), Orpington (South Eastern Division) and Redhill (Central Division) The Explore I got a message in the morning saying it's doable and to go soon. So a few hours later I was there and inside. I'd been meaning to do this one for a long time now, especially as its pretty local, so now was a good a time as any. It's actually not a very large bunker, but its nice for its modest size. The infamous 100 steps lived up to its reputation as terrifying. I only went up a few steps, but that's enough. I actually bumped into another explorer here who got the fright of his life as I turned the corner and shown my light at him in a moment of confusion and panic. Turned out to be someone else who got the memo and took a trip down to see it from a little further afield. A nice little bunker, rich full of history. Photos
  22. Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes....... Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know. Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. The 19th century house itself is on a massive estate and parts of the estate are live & lived in. There are 2 floors & a basement, the house has some lovely features, the stairs, the swimming pool & indoor courtyard & there’s plenty to spend a couple of hours there photographing. The basement is quite big & has a drive in access point & (GoonTube Click bait warning time) has a FERKIN PANZER TANK in one of the rooms, that’s the headlines and that’s what the Goons will be selling it as but the reality is that it is a home made & nowhere near finished & is made of wood. A bit meh for me tbh. Just outside the house there is a BMW parked half in a bush. The house is ok, the features are great but there’s more to be offered from this site. There’s numerous buildings to visit & as soon as I had shoot the last bits I wanted to shoot myself, Paul & Curt went off to see what we could find, there were some ruins , out buildings & a pyramid near the house that looked cool & as we were walking through the woods we could hear the familiar sound of guns being shot in the not too far distance. We had a bit of a scout around & found the ‘hunters’ in an adjacent field. Now if this was a GoonTube video we’d have become the ‘hunted’ but as this is real life we just ignored them & went the other way. One of our goals was the indoor Tennis courts, this was pretty hard to miss once you got near it. We opened the door & were amazed, yeah it was a tennis court, but it’s last use had been as a venue to watch the Football World Cup on a projector screen, there was a bar set up & every nations flag was hanging up & bunting all over the place, we found a large number of pint glasses depicting the “World Cup 1996” so it appears that it was the last time the courts had been used other than for a bit of storage. TBH it was quite trashy but among the trash we found (click bait warning) a HUMAN SKELETON!! And what you going to do with a skull on a explore? Yep, put glasses on it & a fag in its mouth, named him Dr McCoy and take some pictures. What... you wouldn’t... yeah I know, Exploring is a serious business but I like to have a laugh too while I’m out visiting. We were in the tennis courts for quite some time before going to the wood sheds & then the boat house. The boat house was the main thing on my hit list & it was ok, I was setting up to shoot & among the sounds of gun shots ringing out we heard someone shouting “YOU IN THE WOODS!! STAY STILL!!” so we done what any self respecting Umbexer would do & we bailed back through the wood to the soundtrack of “STAY THERE!” & gunshots. As we were running I got my foot caught and I went down like I’d been shot, Paul & Curt were worried & frantic, and by worried & frantic I mean pissing themselves laughing, I don’t know if it was a dream or not but I’m sure I heard Paul say “what the fuck are you doing on the floor, get up!” and as I got up I could see that we’d run into the guy who was shouting at us. “What you doing on my land?” the ruddy faced man shouted, “We’re photographing the Red Kites” I replied & he told us to go over the fence & “gerroff moi land” & we left. Well, that was my first report, probably my last too :-
  23. History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
×