Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Chelmsford'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 10 results

  1. History The Chapel of St. Luke, designed by Elcock and Sutcliffe (two prominent architects at the time), was the chapel attached to Runwell Mental Health Hospital. It was constructed in 1937, alongside the hospital. Once competed the entire site was viewed as a pioneering development in mental health hospitals and the project boosted both architect’s reputations significantly. The hospital was divided into several specific zones, separating buildings and patients according to purpose and diagnosis. The Grade 2 listed chapel was placed at the principal junction at the top of the drive. The chapel, which has a cruciform ground plan, is constructed of white brick with heavy ashlar masonry. Its design is reported to be in an eclectic Mediterranean style with clever positioning of windows to light the alter and nave. Some of the building’s key features include the tiled mansard roof, an apse at the east end and a circular stair tower with a spiral staircase to the north of the apse. As for the furnishings, the altar, riddle posts, organ, choir stalls and lectern are all made of varnished timber. The pulpit, organ and choir stalls are all said to have jazz modern fluted frieze (a particular type of design), and the lights in the main nave take the form of roman lamps. Closure of the hospital was announced in the late 1990s. The entire site was gradually closed down, bit by bit, for many years after this date though. In the end, it did not close until 2010, as this was when the final closure and decommissioning of the site was eventually set. By April of the same year, all staff and patients at the hospital had been moved out. Today, only a handful of the site’s buildings have survived demolition, which started in 2012; these include the water tower, the Chapel of St. Luke and part of the administration building. It is rumoured that the chapel’s bell tower is now the home to a colony of bats, and that Chelmsford County Council are looking into ways of finding alternative accommodation for the creatures so that the building can be reused. Our Version of Events While cruisin’ around one of the new housing estates in Runwell, the Chapel of St. Luke appeared on the horizon. Without too much ducking and diving, or getting impaled on fences, we quickly found ourselves on the grounds of the chapel. At first glance, we thought that the building matches the style of the new housing estate that now surrounds it particularly well. The church has a modern feel to it, but, unfortunately, there isn't much left of it. After a quick sing song on the piano and a failed attempt at playing the organ, it was time to head back to the car and get back on the road! There wasn’t very much to see so it was a quick in-out jobbie. Explored with A-Jay. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14:
  2. History The building this report is based on is the old art deco Filter House. The building housed all of the equipment and tanks that were needed to complete the chemical filtration process. It also contained a laboratory which was used to handle chemicals and conduct tests, to ensure the water was fit for human consumption before being sent to the nearby reservoir. The site on which the old chemical filter building at Sandford Mill sits began life as a corn mill. The timber mill was constructed sometime in the early 19th century, directly over a stream that would run underneath the centre of the building. The stream drove a large water wheel, which provided power to the corn mill. By the end of the century, a steam engine was installed to generate additional power. It is noted that coal used to run the engine was supplied from Newcastle-under-Lyme, which was transported along canals via horse drawn barges. In 1923 Chelmsford Corporation purchased the site for the construction of a new Borough Waterworks. Construction of the new facility began in 1926, around the time milling in the area ceased. The old corn mill was subsequently demolished, save for two cottages which were built in 1905. They are the only surviving remnants of the original mill. The waterworks started operating in March 1929, despite the fact that it was not fully completed until July 1930. The preliminary site consisted of a large red brick building which became known as the ‘Engine House’. Water from the River Chelmer, and from a 650ft deep borehole was both treated and pumped inside this building using electrically-driven pumps. These were powered by diesel driven alternators during the day and the mains electricity supply by night. The capacity of the waterworks was improved in 1956, following the construction of a new building that was known as the ‘Filter House’. The entire water treatment process was transferred over to the new building, and additional pumps were installed in the Engine House. Three further pump houses were also erected across the site, to move the water around the site through the various stages of the treatment process. The largest pump house, positioned over by the weir, became known as the River Pump House. After being treated the water was transported via the Engine House over to Galleywood Reservoir, approximately four miles away, for use in Chelmsford. Although local rumour has it that the building was designed and constructed by the same Scottish architects, Dunn and Watson, who are responsible for the construction of the Marconi factory in Chelmsford, this is in fact not true. Dunn and Watson’s practice closed in 1912, forty-four years before the chemical building was completed. While the Filter House follows a very similar late art deco design, whoever constructed it remains unknown. During the mid-70s, the water industry was nationalised and the site was acquired by the Essex Water Company. To avoid the operating two duplicated sites in close proximity of one another, the water company decided to transfer all operations to a site further down the River Chelmer, at Langford. By 1984, all water pumping at the Sandford Mill site ceased and the facility was made completely redundant. Most of the equipment was removed that same year, and the land was returned to the Borough Council. Our Version of Events At the end of areasonably successfulday of exploring over in Colchester, where we’d ended up finding ourselves in a semi-abandoned hospital, we decided to meet up with Xploring and DRZ_Explorer. For the rest of the evening we fucked around trying to get into a cinema, then in the clock tower of the Britvic site and finally, rather randomly, a cemetery. After that, we arranged to meet up the next night because there was some sort of chemical filter building nearby that sounded like it was a good wander. From what we were being told, the place sounded like it was something a bit different and unique. The following evening came, and we all met up down a small country lane by the side of a canal. Getting onto the site wasn’t particularly difficult; although, finding a way inside the building itself presented its own set of challenges. However, it wasn’t long before we were all inside the building, gathered at the bottom of the main staircase that leads into the main tank room. It was at this point we realised visiting during the night perhaps wasn’t the greatest idea ever conceived. Once we climbed the stairs and entered the large hall housing the chemical tanks it suddenly dawned on us that the room is has windows on every side, and overlooking the building are the former mill cottages and the museum – where there were lights switched on. We did our best to take photos throughout the building, but not being able to light-paint too well meant that most of the shots came out a bit shit. In the end, we gave up and decided we’d pop back the following day, during daylight hours. We returned the next day, and were disappointed to find a white van parked outside. So, for the next hour or so we had to play the waiting game and a couple of rounds of dominos, until the van and its occupants finally fucked off. Thankfully, they did eventually leave, so we made our way back to the entrance we’d found the previous night. Fortunately, it was still open. Once inside, visibility was incredible. Plenty of natural light was pouring through the windows, making our job of snapping up some photos much easier. What is more, now we could properly take in our surroundings. The lads from the previous night had been right, the place looked amazing. With all of the tiles around, it was kind of like standing in an ancient swimming baths, crossed with an old-school batman-styled chemical factory – the type where bad-guys and scientists have a high risk of falling into a vat of unspecified chemical waste. Much to our disappointment, neither batman nor the joker turned up. The only weird thing we stumbled across were a few skeletons of rabbits and squirrels. As others have said before, it looked like a small-scale massacre had taken place. Our theory, then, is that the animals had somehow managed to get inside the building, because, as with all explores, it has been broken into a few times. This means at some point the doors and windows may have been open to the little critters. Since all the skeletons look fairly intact, it looked more like the animals died due to poisoning – they are inside a former chemical filtering building after all, where there is an abundance of chemical residue. How they all managed to end up in the same room, however, is a harder phenomenon to explain. Our guess is that Poison Ivy may have inhabited the building at some point, and she moved all the corpses into that room where she was able to have a bit of a barbeque. We found her cans of special brew; evidence that she definitely cooked something up in that room. Anyway, we’re certain that this theory surpasses all others in terms of its validity and reliability. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa, Stewie and Xploring. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  3. History Chelmsford is the county town of Essex; it was granted city status in 2012 and is now a key location for redevelopment. The City Park West site is one of those developments, located on the land that was home to the Anglia Ruskin University Central Campus. Most of the campus was demolished in 2010 and since then a number of residential and commercial buildings have begun to appear in its place. Three historic buildings still remain and have been completely refurbished: The Anne Knight, Frederick Chancellor and Law buildings. The site was specifically selected as it is adjacent to the train station, and reasonably close to the bus depot. The company, Genesis, managed to obtain planning permission for the development. As far as their plans go, City Park West will be a contemporary mixed tenure build with one and two bedroom apartments on offer, along with three additional townhouses that will be available to rent. The company suggest that the ‘state-of-the-art’ apartments will feature all the style and quality customers are looking for. Some of these features include balconies, designer kitchens and dimmer lighting controls throughout each property. It is expected that over five hundred homes will be available when the project is finally complete. Additional office, retail and community units will be constructed in phase two of the development. Our Version of Events It was a mild night in the City of Chelmsford, just perfect for a spot of climbing. With a decent sized white crane in mind, we met up with Slayaaaa (and his friend), who we’d already arranged to meet up with a few days earlier, and made our way over to the City Park West construction site. Without too much fucking around, we managed to get onto the site and were instantly greeted by thousands of tons of fresh concrete. We did our best to stick to the designated safety paths, but there may be an accidental footprint here and there. We apologise, Genesis, it was dark and we didn’t fancy shining our torches around for fear that you might try to stop us climbing your crane. If it’s any consolation it was a very deep wet patch, so the next day I woke up to find that my shoe had transformed into something that’s now pretty heavy duty. Anyway, after navigating our way through the concrete swamp, we finally managed to reach the base of the crane. Looking at the tall structure close up, it became obvious quite quickly that this was one of the cheaper pieces of shit. The ladders were light and bendy, and once we began our ascent the entire structure felt as though it was moving ever so slightly. After a long, non-stop, climb upwards we emerged at the top, slightly breathless. I always forget about the problems a tripod can pose when trying to climb anything, and as usual it was a right bastard the entire way up, catching itself on every possible piece of metal there was to get caught on. Nonetheless, as we stood for a quick moment, looking over of Chelmsford as we caught our breath, we were greeted by fantastic views, so the all the problems on the ladder were instantly forgotten. All in all, it wasn’t the largest crane in the world, and it was a little cramped on top, but I guess that was to be expected. We set about taking as many snaps as possible for the first fifteen minutes or so. After that we pissed about a bit on the rear ballast (it functioned well as a decent seat) and main jib, and spent a fair amount of time just taking in the view. As always, it didn’t take too long to get back down. Even the concrete swamp seemed easier to traverse as we were making our exit. Explored with Slayaaaa. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  4. So this was my second outing, explored alone. I only managed to get into one building, I think it may have been a residential one. Nothing in the way of medical equipment, which was a shame... I only spotted one way into the main building, but didn't fancy attempting it alone. Anyway, here are some pics. I don't know if this is in the right category, seeing as there isn't really much hospitally stuff. Hoping to return here and have a go at some other areas, see the bits I wanted to see, seeing as I was born somewhere in there! So if anyone fancies it, give me a shout. Thanks for looking.
  5. Once owned by Essex MP John Archer Houblon from 1810 to 1820 and a descendant of the first governor of the Bank of England this has been on the buildings at risk register for several years. The following was taken from The Essex Chronicle. Despite the roof missing a quarter of its tiles and the attic windows being broken and open to the elements, locals say Mrs Jill Rigler still lives there. The Riglers bought the house from agents Cheale in 1995. On several occasions when the Chronicle called, only the growling of a guard dog through a cat flap indicated residency, and the stable block was in use. A neighbour said: "We get a lot of people knocking here to see if the place is for sale. We long to see it reinstated. Mrs Rigler is a very private person." Allen Buckroyd, Baddow's village historian, surveyed the property in 2004 and was shocked this week to see how it has deteriorated since then. Sad place "Compared to the photograph taken in 1925 it is a sad place," he said. "It used to be vibrant then with garden parties around the lake. "Now I can only conclude someone is biding their time to have the whole place covered with houses because there is a plan to so develop a field on the other side of the road." The this from a later edition of The Essex Chronicle THE former mansion home of a 19th century Chelmsford MP has been saved by a property developer. Neglected Pitt Place in Great Baddow - top of the county's at risk register two years ago - has been rescued by Douglas Carroll, who runs property developer Newells in Moulsham Street, Chelmsford. For years the mansion was owned by teacher Jill Rigler until Newells bought it with plans to return to its "regency glory". Baddow historian Allen Buckroyd, who watched the building deteriorate rapidly since 2004, said: "It's a house worthy of a lord of the manor and now it seems it can start looking like it again. "It is the most wonderful piece of heritage, with stately rooms and panelled ceilings. Mrs Rigler's son, John, said: "My mother had owned the property since 1990 but has never been in the position to take care of it in the manner it deserves. "My mother is a very private person who sadly chose to batten down the hatches and hoped the problem would go away. "We would have sorely loved to approach a body for a grant of some sort but would not have known where to start." In the garden near the lake was a thatched single roomed summer house
  6. The Marconi Radio Factory, Chelmsford This was a return visit after getting busted by plod in March after only 20 minutes. Back then we only touched the out buildings but had seen enough for it to be put on the back burner. With my new baby daughter expected within the week then I was under orders to stay near to home so I could hot foot it back if the "head appeared". Little did I know that I would be spending ten hours in a police cell and wouldn't walk through the front door until the early hours of the next morning The History Marconi's New Street factory was built in 1912 next to the Great Eastern Railway. A railway siding ran across New Street into the factory yard and brought materials in one end of the works and took finished radio equipment out of the other. At the South end of the building two huge aerial masts once stood, the 450ft (137m) high "Marconi Poles" formed Chelmsfords most prominent landmark. During the Second World War the Marconi Company employed more than 6,000 people in Chelmsford. Producing vital military communications equipment, the New St factory became a target for bombing and was hit in May 1941 with a loss of 17 lives. In 1920, two years before the BBC was established, the New Street factory made history as the site of the first official British sound broadcasts including the famous concert by Dame Nellie Melba which was heard all over the world. Right, just to let you all know that the place is PIR'd up to the hilt, sec were on the way almost as soon a we entered and unfortunately we ended up here for nearly 11 hours
  7. Visited with Wevsky and Space Invader Ive found a little history on St Johns mainly after reading bits on various sites across the web and other reports gleaned from various other forums. St Johns Hospital built originally in 1837 as an infirmary to a local workhouse, had various bits "added" to it over the years, started closing down in 2005 and finally came to an end 18/11/2010 when all its staff and services were re-located to Bromsfield Hospital. In its 133-year history, more than 100,000 babies were born inside the hallowed walls of the hospital's famous maternity ward. Right on with some pics And some "Inside" shots Im not normally a fan of Grafitti but I thought the above was pretty dam good Ill apologise if my post is a bit "pic heavy" but I really love snapping away Hope to be doing lots more in the future, my thanks to Wevsky and Space Invader for a great day out !
  8. The Marconi Radio Factory Visited with Skeleton Key, Priority 7 and Tstranger1066. This was the 2nd stop on our day trip to Chelmsford. The place looks absolutely fantastic, full of bits and bobs, but unfortunately after only 20 minutes we got nabbed by 4 really amicable members of Essex Plod and asked to leave the premises, so it's on the cards for a revisit The History Marconi's New Street factory was built in 1912 next to the Great Eastern Railway. A railway siding ran across New Street into the factory yard and brought materials in one end of the works and took finished radio equipment out of the other. At the South end of the building two huge aerial masts once stood, the 450ft (137m) high "Marconi Poles" formed Chelmsfords most prominent landmark. During the Second World War the Marconi Company employed more than 6,000 people in Chelmsford. Producing vital military communications equipment, the New St factory became a target for bombing and was hit in May 1941 with a loss of 17 lives. In 1920, two years before the BBC was established, the New Street factory made history as the site of the first official British sound broadcasts including the famous concert by Dame Nellie Melba which was heard all over the world. The workers entrance I learned everything I know about attenuation of radio signals and the impact and mitigation of ionospheric anomalies from this book, not to mention two-dimensional ionospheric tomography over low-latitude regions The Gang Thanks for looking
  9. St.Johns's Hospital Chelmsford Visited with Skeleton Key, Tstranger1066 and Priority 7 The doors of St John's Hospital – where half of Chelmsford's population was born – swing shut for the final time on November 18th, 2010, marking the end of a vast chapter in the town's history. Nurses who have worked at the centre for decades fought back tears as they packed their equipment and mementos into a sea of blue plastic boxes. Pictures signifying a thousand happy memories were stripped from its peeling yellow walls, rows of empty beds pushed through bare corridors and a fleet of trucks delivered everything to the new £148 million wing at Broomfield Hospital. But there are fears the site, now prime for housing, could become a wasteland. Thanks for looking
  10. I wanted to go here more for personal reasons than anything else. My mum grew up in Chelmsford, and she and her mum and a lot of their friends all worked for Marconi at different times. Well what can I say it sure is a mess - pikeys and graffiti artists have been at play here. Having said that if you move away from the factory floor areas and into the other areas, it's not actually too bad. It's totally stripped, hardly anything to show what it's purpose was which is a shame. Also it's huge - it really is a pretty big site, you don't realise until you're inside. There must be 4 very large factory floors, with several other large spaces as well as a 5 story high admin block, which although very samey does get better as you go higher. Then there's the very oldest part right at the front. Visited on the spur of the moment with Obscurity and his misses - cheers for a good day people It has to be said, this bit's pretty bland Amazingly all the glass is intact, but the ceilings trashed. Old meets new There's a few bits left I love the roof of this building. Reception area was pretty good, shame it's no where near as neat as it was in earlier reports, but it could be worse. The main lobby of the oldest part. Although it was trashed in parts, I thought it was a pretty good - it would have been fantastic to have seen it in it's prime. Maniac.
×