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Found 5 results

  1. This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  2. Explored with Raz after missing out on the last trip Background; Croda was originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The factory opened in 1855 and the company went from having 84 staff in 1840 to a remarkable 2300. (Borrowed from Coolboyslim who borrowed from Lavino - Hope thats okay lads ) The Explore; We arrived at Sunlight Port after a Macdonalds and a swift drive through Liverpool under the Mersey tunnel, and saw that a demolition company has already started on pulling the place down, and with that secca had been employed to protect the 360's and keep pesky explorers out... Not a problem, makes it more fun Generally the place is a bit trashed but still it has some nice parts as im sure you will see below. Time of year is an issue with this place as the high winds at the weekend were shaking the building all over the place at the top. I dont envy Raz who climbed the towers. Sod that!!! On wit' pics; (Yorkshire Dialect - Need to Translate?) Seccaaaaa Thanks for looking
  3. On a sunny Saturday morning I met my two partners in crime (non-forum members) in Glasgow and set off on what was a "secret explore" they had planned for me. After a not that long drive I saw in the distance our destination that was kept until then hidden from me. But the sight was unmistakable and I immediately got excited. The place we were gonna explore was ICI Nobel Ardeer. For a brief history lesson, as always taken from wikipedia, here are some info: Nobel Enterprises is a chemicals business based at Ardeer, near to the North Ayrshire town of Stevenston in Scotland. It specialises in nitrogen-based propellants and explosives and nitrocellulose-based products such as varnishes and inks. It was formerly ICI Nobel, a division of the chemicals group ICI, but is now owned by Inabata & Co., Ltd., a Japanese trading firm. Nobel Industries Limited was founded in 1870 by Swedish chemist and industrialist Alfred Nobel for the production of the new explosive dynamite. Ardeer, on the coast at Ayrshire, was chosen for the company's first factory. The business later diversified into the production of blasting gelatine, gelignite, ballistite, guncotton, and cordite. At its peak, the factory was employing nearly 13,000 men and women. In 1926, the firm merged with Brunner, Mond & Company, the United Alkali Company, and the British Dyestuffs Corporation, creating a new group, Imperial Chemical Industries, then one of Britain's largest firms. Nobel Industries continued as the ICI Nobel division of the company. ICI Ardeer was commonly known locally as the 'factory' or the 'Dinnamite'. At the time the company generally provided higher quality employment regarding terms and conditions and pension rights than other local firms. The Ardeer site was almost like a community, and there were so many people employed there that a bank, travel agent and dentist were at one time based on the site. The former Western Scottish Bus Company provided tens of buses per day to transport the workers to and from the site, and until the mid-1960s there were even two trains per day to transport workers to a station within the factory. In the late 1960s construction began on a nylon and nitric acid plant, but this had a short life, closing down just 12 years later. In 2002 the division, now named Nobel Enterprises, was sold to Inabata. On 8 September 2007 a major fire was reported at the site when 1,500-1,700 tons of nitrocellulose, stored in an open area, caught fire. There was little property damage and no serious injuries. For more click here There are interesting details about the place in the "Secret Scotland" website too (here). What is great about I.N.A. is also what makes it a pain. Location. In the middle of this peninsula, at the bottom of sand dunes that make you feel you are in Tatooine, the power station lies in a surreal environment and the views from the rooftop are unique. However, getting to the power station is a b***, as you can easily get lost. My two buddies had been there twice before and once they spent more than an hour trying to locate it. As there are no signs obviously and since the entire complex is next to live sites, the section of the power station that one can explore is about 20'-30' walk from the place where we parked, which I assume is the most logical place to park anyway. On a sunny dry day the trek is at least manageable, despite having to work your way around a very annoying bog, so unless you have wellies or waders on, you will have to do a lot of zig-zaging. There are several ways around it as we found on our way back, but especially for a virgin visitor this thing can easily become a nightmare. However, on the way to the power station there are various interesting bits and pieces, in a ruinous state but at least they give you a nice understanding of how vast the site used to be, with huge complexes for storing the material, blast walls, almost hidden under the earth rail tracks and more. Reaching now the top of a relatively steep hill along a fence you can finally gaze at the power station and the entire live site that lays behind it. It also gives you a clear line of sight to watch for the patrols of the security. Once we were sure the road was clear we ran down the sand dune (which is quite fun) and through the open space we reached the station praying we got there unnoticed in such a bright day. It turned out we did and we walked inside. The entire station is quite trashed as the metal thieves and vandals have done their usual "duty", but it still remains a wonderful industrial sight, so if you fancy that sort of thing, you will not be disappointed. Pipes, cables, dials, gauges... We spent a couple of hours in there and seeing that my 2 friends were really enjoying themselves despite this being their 3rd visit, one can understand that I.N.A. never gets boring. After spending enough time on the ground floor, roaming through some back offices where you still find paperwork and logs, I made it up to the roof, through a pigeon-infested area which gave me some great views of the area. Leaving we made a short stop to one of the huge warehouse-like structures with long corridors and stashes of wires that obviously were never retrieved after being ripped off their original location. I.N.A. is definitely worth plenty of visits for the individual who wishes to really see everything there is to see. =====PHOTOS======= At the quarry on your way to the station. Long way to go. Pipes galore. View from above. Pigeon hall. Ripped apart. Stairs. Turn them all. These readings ain't right. Safety. You know it makes sense. More pipe porn. Lovely details all over. And a chair of course. Roof access permit. I forgot to get one on my way up but nobody asked me for one. The boilers. Just beautiful despite its decayed/trashed state. Stairs leading down to offices. One last look. On our way back up the sand dune. Rows and rows of warehouse structures. Inside one of the warehouses. =====THE END===== Thank you for reading!
  4. Norway O'Melt-Down! (Aug. 2013)

    Finally back.. Was out for a few month due to some unfortunate events and haven't had much time till now to do cool things. Anyway, finally finding some time again, so started to work on the loads of pics i still have lying around and doing some new explores as well. The pics below are from (a part of) an enormous steel & chemical plant and this building in particular was used for the production of Cyanamid & Calcium Carbide. Most of the factory was build in 1906 and was operational until 2003.. The majority of the buildings have been demolished by now, but the remaining bits are either re-purposed or preserved as national heritage. This one in particular was quite interesting, as it contains 325 big steel ovens and is officially labelled as heritage... Pretty impressive factory, as well as stunning surroundings, as it's located somewhere in a beautiful fjord... Lighting conditions were terrible. Very harsh sunlight outside and very little light inside.. On top of that, it was really rather dirty and tricky to walk in some bits.. (thick layers of very slippery chemicals everywhere on the floors, especially in the basement.. ) Anyway, not my best set, but it was still a fun explore. Ok, on with the shots: 1# 2# 3# 4# 5# 6# 7# 8# 9# 10# 11# 12# 13# 14# 15# Cheers for looking!
  5. Already covered on forums in great detail but its a first for me , history taken from Wiki.... 1. We are an independent chemical manufacturing company. We specialise in organic chemistry and offer contract manufacturing services and a range of fine chemical intermediates to the crop science, health & nutrition and specialty markets. Hickson & Welch specialises in the synthesis of organic chemical intermediates and has two principal businesses: Contract Manufacture and Fine Chemical Intermediates Both businesses operate from a 74 hectare site at Castleford, West Yorkshire, which has an efficient and flexible manufacturing infrastructure and first-class safety and environmental performance. 2a/2b....typo oopps Hickson and Welsh Probably the very best chemical manufacturer we can recommend. We also supply in organic chemical intermediates and custom synthesis for crop science products. We have the experience, expertise and facilities to produce almost any intermediate no matter how complex it may be. 3/4. 5. 6. 7/8. 9. Examples of our product capabilities include: * Sulfonyl chlorides and sulfonamides * Isocyanates and sulfonyl isocyanates * S-Triazines * Pyrimidines * Pyridines * Thiols and sulfides * Aromatic amines * Nitro aromatics * Acid chlorides 10/11. 80 Years Of Chemical Manufacturing Expertise * 1915 - Ernest Hickson built a plant for TNT and picric acid production * 1920's - Switched production to nitrotoluenes for dyes and pigments * 1940's - Large scale chlorination Largest UK producer of DDT * 1950's - Ceased DDT. Phosgenation to produce ureas. Optical Brightening agents * 1960's - Expansion of nitrotoluenes * Tax Accountants * 1970's - Contract manufacturing investment * 1990's - Expansion of hydrogenation and phosgenation facilities * 2000 - Acquisition by Arch Chemicals 12/13. 14. 15. 16. 17/18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Thanks for looking Oldskool...
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