Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Durham'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 9 results

  1. History “I was born over the road in Beacon Hill in 1942, and it was run down when I went down for eggs as a kid… It was never a posh place, but it was occupied by some old time farmers – lovely people” (Malcolm Hall of Kirklevington). Although it was originally a village, Little Burdon is a small Hamlet located just outside Darlington, near the village of Sadberge. Most of the Hamlet consists of a Grade II listed farm that was constructed sometime in the 18th century (mid-1700s). It is rumoured that the Little Burdon estate once belonged to the Burdon family; a well-established gentry family who were widely dispersed across County Durham from the late 14th century. The Burdons were originally granted land by the Bishop of Durham in 1337 and, subsequently, they were able to build their first house. Like most families who were given land, they prospered, and before long they had several properties across Durham. The farm was built much later by notable Burdon descendants, but it served well to extend the small Burdon ‘empire’ and the villages that bore their name – Great Burdon, Little Burdon, Old Burdon and Town Burdon. A recent report suggests that the last residents of Little Burdon were two brothers, Harry and Gordon Barron. Gordon was well-known for breeding prize-winning Clydesdale horses; many of the horses Gordon bred won the stallion class at the Great Yorkshire Show. Unfortunately, however, in 1995 a band of masked robbers ransacked the farmstead after tying the Barron Brothers up at knifepoint. This was the first robbery ever recorded at Little Burdon, and it was also one of the last times the Barrons of Burdon were ever mentioned in any form of archive. While both of the brothers survived the attack, they never returned to their home after the incident. Consequently, after the turn of the millennium the farmstead had deteriorated badly. Described as ‘an extensive renovation project’, the property was later sold at auction in 2013, for £175,000, but no work was ever started to try save the buildings. As for Harry and Gordon Barron, sadly two deaths under their names were registered in 1996 (Harry – aged 82 years old) and 1997 (Gordon – aged 77 years old). Our Version of Events Little Burdon seems to be one of those places you rarely ever stop at. Since the A66 runs past, and there’s no obvious reason to get out of the car around this area, you can easily miss the old Grade II listed farmstead that is slowly falling apart. We have noticed it many times before, but have also ignored it on every occasion. This time, however, we decided to have a quick poke around because, recently, we’ve been trying to cover more places that are closer to home. It’s really easy to overlook them, but sometimes the things on your doorstep can be quite interesting and more often than not they are worth checking out. Given that the old farm is in the middle of nowhere, and it no longer has any windows or doors, access wasn’t very difficult at all. Other than an empty car parked outside the main farmhouse, the place was silent too. After stepping over some rubble to enter the site, we chose to start off in what appeared to be the former courtyard. From here we were able to access the stables, old storage areas, sties and finally the farmhouse itself. From the offset we weren’t expecting to find anything amazing. It’s pretty clear from the roadside that the building is absolutely fucked. Nevertheless, as the site has some interesting history attached to it, we felt it was worth a quick look. All in all, some of the rooms are fairly interesting, and there are a couple of photogenic fireplaces, but, aside from that, there’s very little else inside. It was only afterwards that we discovered there is a famous lead firemark positioned on one of the walls inside, which signifies that someone took out an insurance policy with the Globe Insurance Company in the 19th century. Unfortunately, it didn’t appear in any of our shots either, which is a shame, but we ‘borrowed’ a photo of it to show you all and save us having to go back. After spending twenty minutes or so on the site, and pretty much ready to head back to the car, we were suddenly aware that someone else was nearby. We could hear some loud rustling in the grass around the corner from us. This is how it usually goes of course… You’re exploring the worst derps imaginable and someone happens catches you snooping around. Rather than hide or slip away, though, as we might have done on a site that wasn’t falling apart, we decided we’d be sociable and go talk to whoever it was; perhaps they’d know a little something about the place? As it turned out, however, we’d simply stumbled upon the owners of the car parked outside the front of the farmhouse. An embarrassed-looking couple were emerging from the bushes around the back, just as we turned the corner. The guy did a quick check of his fly as he properly clocked us, and his female companion appeared to be straightening her jacket. That’s what it looked like anyway. Both appeared to be very smartly dressed too – not quite the attire you’d expect for walking. We can only wonder what they were up to, hiding there in the bushes together… Explored with Ford Mayhem and Box. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  2. History Tanfield culvert was built in 1723 as owners of nearby coal mines needed a way of moving material from their pits to the Tyne (see Tanfield Railway). From the river it could then be loaded onto ships and transported to large industrial cities in the South. As the surrounding land was not suitable for a canal, and two sections of the Causey Burn had to be crossed, the mine owners were forced to build a wagon way to reach the river. At one of these sections, the culvert was constructed; it was dug out by hand, and the land above was raised higher by manually adding thousands of tons of soil. This ensured it was capable of supporting a railway line. Later, in 1725, at the second problematic section of the stream, a large single span bridge was constructed using the Roman compression arch concept, alongside large abutments to the valley sides. Today, the surviving Grade I culvert and archway are, in effect, open to the public; the former is a road, while the latter is a pedestrian walkway. Both the culvert and the archway were built using the same sandstone. If entered from the Western portal, the first part of the culvert comprises an arched stone section. Further on, wooden support beams, which were placed inside the tunnel to help prop up the rock and earth directly above, are still in situ. The floor is largely uneven and rocky throughout, until the wooden boardwalk section is reached at the halfway point. Finally, towards the end there is a large modern concrete structure, presumably created when the bank required reinforcement work, when the railway was replaced with a road. Our Version of Events Back in the safety of the north, and away from the chaos of London, we decided to return to the Tanfield area and check out an old culvert a couple of us had spotted there many years ago while climbing near Causey Arch. We arrived bright and early (early for us at least) and wadered up in a nearby car park. From there we walked over to the stream. As there were a few walkers around giving us confused looks, we played the ‘we’ll pretend to be fishermen’ card. However, our plan didn’t seem to work at all; if anything, they stared even harder. At the stream’s edge, the sun was beginning to come out from behind the world famous overcast cloud that often seems to be a permanent feature of the North East. It was a pleasant change from all the rain we’d been experiencing of late. Unfortunately, however, our time getting a tan was cut short as the number of people watching us was growing at an alarming rate, to the extent that a small crowd was beginning to form. So, wasting no time, we jumped straight into it and headed directly for the Western portal to get out of sight. The first section was incredibly rocky, so going was slow to avoid falling over and filling the old waders up with water. A couple of sofas also lay ahead and required a spot of climbing; they made a perfect gathering place though, while we waited for the welly-wearers among us to catch up, as it offered some convenient seating. Of course, we did fail to take into account the fact that old sofas don’t fare well in wet conditions, and as we made the mistake of using them for their original purpose we very nearly ended up in the drink. After our near-mishap, we avoided the seating and chose to stand as we watched the others. They were struggling hard to avoid breaching their wellies; the water was millimetres away from spilling over. They almost made it too, until an unexpected drop cause an unavoidable deep area. Once we were all past the sofas, the stream suddenly became much shallower and less rocky, and our progress through this section quickened. From this point on we found ourselves beneath archaic wooden supports. Water trickled from the ceiling and the beams, causing sporadic droplets to fall on us as we walked. It smelt earthy and damp in this part, and there’s something oddly satisfying about that combination, it smells good. The odour continued right up to the boardwalk section, where old wooden sleepers have been lain out perfectly on the floor. We were surprised to find a floor like this; you would have thought the floor would rot very quickly being in a river, and yet, it’s been there for years. The final section of the tunnel finished with the large concrete arch. From memory, the ceiling felt much higher in here and, although it’s modern, there is something about it that gives it a dramatic sort of feel; there’s the sense that’s it’s a bit boring, but somehow it’s also very impressive at the same time. If you don’t like spiders, however, you might find this section less appealing because, for some unknown reason, there were hundreds of them here – all different shapes and sizes, and lots of legs and eyes. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane and Box. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19:
  3. The history The Durham County Hospital was constructed in the middle of the 19th century and began operation as a voluntary hospital. The hospital saw growth in the 20th century due medical advances, the growth of the city and the construction of a nearby railway viaduct. In total 5 major phases of building works have seen new buildings been added to the hospital in the 20th century to keep pace with demand. The hospital closed in 2010 and several proposals to turn the hospital into housing seem dead in the water. The trespassing I wasn't feeling optimistic about the odds of getting into this, after arriving in broad daylight and observing the hi-vis patrolling the perimeter. After a good deal of time ambling around the site and some luck I was in. There isn't much left here, the appeal of the place is probably in the facade of the original stone building, all the external shots that I have were taken from the inside through the windows. Pretty soon I came across indications of past explorers, which include but are not limited too, -Signage laid out in a photogenic way -A tripod left in the middle of a corridor (broken?) -Bloody hand prints that caused me to do a bit of a double take, red paint (I hope). And the rest of the shots,
  4. This is somewhere that has been done to death so I won't bore you all with the history! A complete dump really but seriously one of the most photogenic places I have been to. I quite enjoyed it here, visited the day before and stood watching as 3 teenagers were throwing slates from the roof in to the pool below. Decided to go back the next day. Went back, empty! Had a nice walk around, stood for a minute thinking how beautiful it would have looked in its heydey with tons of swimmers in the pool ad watching from the balconies. A bit dodgy in areas, walked halfway along the right hand side balcony and realised it was sloping towards the main pool. That was nearly a brown trouser moment slowly made my way back to safety. As we were leaving there were 2 girls at the other end of the pool taking pics, they must have been no older than 14, was quite nice. They reminded me of me when I was younger, I imagined they had probably told their mum they were round their mates when really they were in the local derelict playground! They are hopefully the next generation of us. Anyway on with the pics!
  5. Checked this school out on a bit of a whim with a non member whilst doing something else in the area, we wasn't sure what to expect having not done any proper research on it, first impressions weren't good as it's looking very knackered outside, however inside it was a real treat, heavily boarded but despite this what light there is inside was spot on and seemed to add to it making it really photogenic, hence the overkill on the images (sorry) Mucho dead pigeons and their shit everywhere but to be expected the length it's been shut. The School was opened in 1913. According to Kelly’s Directory for 1914 “Easington Colliery School for boys, girls and infants when completed will have cost £21,000 for 1296 children; average attendance 320 boys, 310 girls and 325 infants. However further records show that the sexes were separated with the girls’ school opening 2nd March 1914 and the boys school, a year later on 26th May 1915. In the separate schools the seniors were upstairs and the younger ones downstairs,The boys building was at the top of the bank separated by two yards from the girls’ building which was further down the road, nearer to the colliery. Each department had its own yard with outside toilets. In the senior boys’ yard was a special building,tucked in the corner for woodwork with a matching one for cookery in the girls’ yard.** This arrangement continued until 1938 when the “New School†(always known as this even when it was about to be demolished in the 1990’s) was built. This building was between the colliery and the village in an area known locally as the ‘Waterworks’. The Schools closed mid 90's from what i can gather. .. .. .. .. .. .. Cheers for looking
  6. Was a little disappointed in this, but when I saw the chapel my opinion changed.
  7. Took a trip down to the Durham swimming baths a couple of months ago with a non forum member. Seems the asbestos was stripped out in 2008 after it had closed and has been left to rot ever since. It's clearly in bad shape and a frequent hang out for graffiti artists and UrbExers. It's been reported loads before so I wont bore you with too many pics. Obligatory fire hose shot
  8. This complex of tunnels all run into one another, but are all owned and used by different people with the exception of the Durham Hill tunnel which is too unstable to be used for anything. Up until WWII some of the sets of caves/tunnels existed seperately, but during WWII they were linked up with a single tunnel which intersected them all and also extended to form a second entrance on Durham Hill, hence the name Durham Hill Tunnel for that section. Durham Hill Tunnel This part was excavated in WWII to form a shelter and another entrance to the complex on Durham Hill in Dover. In 1944 part of the tunnel was damaged by an enemy shell which also killed a lady who was in the shelter at the time. The damage still exists to this day as it was never repaired, and the resulting roof fall now separates the durham hill entrance from the rest of the tunnels. This is sometimes refered to as the Cowgate Tunnel, or the Cowgate Street ARP shelter and is very unstable in parts. Right up the far end by the blockage, looking back. This part is concrete lined. From the other end And the very unstable part leading up to it. Soldiers Home Caves Parts of these were also excavated in WWII and intersect all the pre-existing tunnels as well as an old lime kiln on the way. Brick lined section near the entrance just inside the cliff face - this was pre-existing. Section of the interlinking tunnel which was excavated in WWII Part of the old lime kiln which also serves as another entrance into the complex. Tunnel leading up the the kiln. Crouchers Tunnels These tunnels are known as 'Croucher's Tunnels' after the Croucher & Co Shipwrights, who operated from premises in front of the tunnels in the 1960s & 70s, and used the tunnels as a store. Prior to this they seem to have been known as 'Bushell's Caves', presumably after Bushell & Co. who previously occupied the site. The tunnels themselves form the centre section of the tunnels on Snargate Street. These are still very much in use and we were very lucky to see them. Courts' Wine Vaults/Barwicks caves. These tunnels were excavated by Dover wine merchant Stephen Court at the beginning of the 19th Century. They were dug into cliffs at the rear of the Courts' premises in Snargate Street, and along with terraced gardens and a folly shaped like Dover Castle on the cliff face, were a tourist attraction in their day. During the war they formed part of the air raid shelter complex, and after the war local building firm R.J Barwick moved onto the site and the caves have been known as 'Barwick's Caves' ever since. Stuff in storage down there includes loads of silk screens used for printing. And there's some very interesting decorative engravings down there as well. All in all a very interesting set of tunnels. Cheers for looking. Maniac.
  9. After chasing up loads of failures locally, Thompski and I decided to leave the shitty midlands and head up north to hit up a load of sites on a weekend roadtr0p fuelled on relentless and booze. Ushaw college (sorry!) was the first site we visited. History can be found at the usual source here I know this has been absolutely battered recently so I'll keep it brief. Access was fairly straightforward although we made it a bit harder than it needed to be :banghead After successful deployment, we headed straight to the most interesting bit And I engaged in some 50mm faggotry The rest of the place is fairly uninspiring, so only a few shots. That was it for our first site of the trip. The chapel made for a stunning start to a generally favourable couple of days Cheers for stopping by, RJ
×