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Found 24 results

  1. History “As fresh as they get. Vegetables harvested from neighbouring fields and sold in a traditional road side market style. If you are travelling north, through the Kapiti Coast, pop in to sample their seasonal faire.” Sang Sue Limited was a Chinese owned ‘acknowledged expert’ in the fruit and vegetable business. Although there are many other fruit and vegetable suppliers in the Kapiti coastal region, Sang Sue’s was known for its exceptionally fresh produce. In addition to the naturally grown products sold at the premises, Sue also supplied freshly baked bread from a small onsite craft bakery, because ‘good bread is one of the great pleasures of the table’, and beer, spirits, wine and cider sourced from boutique breweries around Kapiti. The cellar was described as being ‘well-stocked’, and the team of liquor sellers were very knowledgeable and passionate about their fully licenced goods. The small business boasted that it sold nearly 800 different subcategories in food and drink; some of these included fresh produce, dried and dehydrated fruits, mayonnaise and salads, delicatessens, cheese and cheese products, and food products machinery. Unfortunately, despite its success, back in 2015 the New Zealand Transport Agency acquired the business and closed it to make way for the MacKays to Peka Peka expressway; an 18 km four lane project that will cost the government $630 million. Our Version of Events Leaving Wellington early-ish, in an effort to reach a town called Bulls, we decided to have a quick break at a random fruit and vegetable suppliers that appeared to be abandoned. Hoping there might be some sort of home brew leftover we decided to investigate. Upon closer inspection it was obvious that the shop itself was fully stripped of anything interesting, so we decided to head around the back. We didn’t expect to find an awful lot around there, but experience has told us to always check the entire outside perimeter of a site; you never know what might be lurking. Bypassing the guard dog warning sign, and a very large barbed wire fence and gate, we crawled through some extremely thorny bushes instead – because that seemed like the least painful option at the time. As we emerged through the sharp barbs, dead branches, and from beneath a large truck trailer that had become part of the bush, we were expecting to find an overgrown back garden; maybe, we surmised, it would have had an old algae-filled pond or something. We soon discovered our assumptions had been incorrect, however, as we found ourselves stood inside a bizarre vehicle graveyard of some sort. There was an array of vehicles: cars, quad-bikes, tractors, trucks and vans. It was quite clear that some had been there for a long time as the ground was steadily absorbing some, and foliage had consumed others; one, which was completely sealed, even had a bush growing inside it. Much more satisfied with our find at this point, we decided to hang around for twenty minutes to grab a few shots. After that, we left. Jobs a goodun’. Explored with Nillskill and Bane. Sang Sue's Place 1: Sang Sue Fruit and Vegetable Shop 2: A Quick Look Inside 3: Sue's House 4: Sue's Bed 5: Sue's Shed 6: Sue's Indoor Garden 7: Sue's Little Runaround Buggy 8: Sue's Other Indoor Garden 9: Sue's Storage Warehouse 10: Sue's Machinery 11: Sue's Till Sue's Vehicle Collection 12: Fork Lifts 13: Quad-bike 14: Standard Van 15: A Bigger Van 16: Tractors 17: Digger 18: A Bigger Digger 19: Farm Equipment 20: Sue's Fleet 1 21: Sue's Fleet 2 22: Sue's Fleet 3 23: Sue's Fleet 4 and Car With a Bush Inside 24: The Beast 25: Sue Has a Dark Side
  2. At last I get to go to visit a train graveyard! I went to Oakamoor for a look round but even the rails have been taken away from there and scrapped. (non-HD people should press the back button and look at some drains ) Anyway, just before it was dark I managed to get pictures from another location I'd seen on Google Maps. I couldn't get up onto all of the carriages because of a bad elbow at the moment I'm surprised it hasn't been sold off for scrap. It was nice to go inside a proper old fashioned passenger carriage which hadn't been vandalized in any way. First some general shots from walking around...... and my favourite carriage......
  3. France 3 Planes... Sept '15

    A small plane graveyard somewhere in France... Just the 3 planes here but we only checked out 2 as someone from the airport kept driving round so we buggered off! As always... Ta for lookin'
  4. France Garage Pousette... Oct '15

    In a small French village, in the middle of nowhere, lies this old garage/car graveyard... ...Garage Pousette... Thanks for lookin' folks...
  5. Visited with Raz & 2 non members. Background; Very little on this place other than that there are a load of Robin (not so) Reliant cars left rotting in what i believe to be someones back garden. The explore; After meeting our local contact (who forgot to tell me about this for 2 years!!!) we hopped the fence and immediately i was in heaven being a bit of a car enthusiast in denial. Red, blue, white and green cars in all states of decay and rust but thats exactly what we like right? Spent about an hour mishing around light painting as we did this at night, probably need to return in the day but it could be a little bait due to it being in someones garden lol. Enjoy Thanks for looking
  6. Explored with Raz & 2 non members (i think) Background Royal Air Force Station Folkingham or RAF Folkingham is a former Royal Air Force station located south west of Folkingham, Lincolnshire and about 29 miles (47 km) due south of county town Lincoln and 112 miles (180 km) north of London, England. Opened in 1940, it was used by both the Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Forces. During the war it was used primarily as a troop carrier airfield for airborne units and as a subsidiary training depot of the newly formed Royal Air Force Regiment. After the war it was placed on care and maintenance during 1947 when the RAF Regiment relocated to RAF Catterick. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the RAF Bomber Command used Folkingham as a PGM-17 Thor Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) base. Today the remains of the airfield are located on private property being used as agricultural fields, with the main north-south runway acting as hardstanding for hundreds of scrapped vehicles. Went early one february morning for a look around and with the ice melting and sun rising we found this little gem, Bedford fire trucks and all sorts, Love it!! Half hour in a jeep and a van came flying onto site and we took shelter behind a 360 degree tipper. Found us and the conversation went a little like this; Imagine Farmer in a heavy Lincolnshire farmers accent Farmer -"Who are you? What are you doing here?" Us - "We are photographers, taking photos of these vehicles" Farmer - "So why the fuck didn't you ask?!?! How would you like it if i came into your back garden and started taking photos of your things" Us - "We didnt think anyone owned it" Farmer - "Oh yeah, because there is any land in the whole of england that isn't owned" Us - "Sorry" Farmer - "No, i can tell your nice lads but why the fuck didn't you ask?" This went on for a while longer and he then eventually told us to "Fuck off cause ive called the plod" Need to revisit Quite gutted i missed out on the amphibious vehicles, i was hopping to get inside a "Stolly" If you got this far, thanks for looking
  7. Visited this site as was in the area. The main house is currently having work done. But still has all these abandoned cars around the back it's a real shame to see them just wasting away. Was a nice stroll around this place looking at the old jags so he's a bit of history from the web and some pics like I say not much to see off the mansion as it is stripped back to bare brick... It's very difficult to dig up much information at all on this enigmatic building but we have discovered that it was built in 1869 by a Mr. Henry Hoyle Hardman. Henry was the son of George Hardman, a successful local businessman, who built Oakhill House - RIGHT - now the Rossendale Museum, in Rawtenstall. In view of the fact that Horncliffe House as it was then known was such a grand home, it is clear that Henry was also a successful businessman just like his father and in fact he owned Hardman Mill in Newhallhey which is just down in the valley and practically overlooked by the house. Henry died in 1888 but his wife Emily continued to live there until she died a few years later in 1896. The house passed to Annie Hardman (their daughter?) and she lived there until about 1903. The house and it's contents were then sold to a Mr. Roland Rawlinson who owned Myrtle Grove Mill in Waterfoot. And now we have a huge gap with no idea who, what or when until we reach the 1960s! At this time Lancashire County Council operated a care home for the elderly at the house until some time in the 1980s. Whilst it was a care home it was still known as Horncliffe House however when it was subsequently sold on in 1993 it was turned into a hotel and function venue, being re-named Horncliffe Mansions in the process. The operators at that time were Horncliffe Mansions Ltd. but the limited company was dissolved on 23rd. June, 2009 and the hotel closed. It appears now that it has passed back into private ownership once again and apparently the new owner, a property developer, is waiting to hear if he is to be granted permission to change the house back to a residential dwelling. An amusing anecdote was quoted in the local paper - apparently the owner started work in his youth as a florist's assistant and used to deliver flowers to the house when it was a care home. He always said at the time that he would love to own the house! To the rear of the building there is a large, modern, single story function room big enough to seat several hundred people, and literature within the house itself confirms its use as a hotel quite unequivocally. Strangely though a document in the conservatory hinted at a prospective change of use to an old people's home but the document does NOT appear to be from the time period when the house actually functioned in that role! A planning application lodged with Rossendale Borough Council in 2008 states that the owner wished to convert the building from a hotel to a dwelling house, but that was during the period of ownership of the house by the hotel company, not by a private individual! Abandoned then circa 2008/9 - just three years - so why on earth has the owner let it fall into such an appalling state of dereliction in such a short time? A further enigma is the number of old Jaguar cars standing on the lane at the top of the grounds next to a very old, and boarded up, cottage and what appeared to be recently deployed flood precautions on that lane. This shows that someone is still going up to the house periodically. So... after a morning of searching on t'internet all we have managed to find out is that Doctor David Bellamy - he of, "Gwapple me gwapenuts" fame - attended a protest meeting at the hotel back in 2004 when the local NIMBYs decided they didn't like the idea of the nearby moors being used as a site for those appalling windmill power stations. His presence clearly didn't do much good though because they just went ahead and built them anyway!
  8. A collecion of old fire engines dating from the 1940s up to the 1990s from various southern counties and in different states of disrepair. I don't know much about them other than they belong to a collector who will apparently sell you one if you are interested. Good luck with that mate! Visited with my dad whilst on a break with my family, he got collared by a local fire engine geek who traumatised him with his extensive knowledge of fire engines while I ran round taking pics. Sadly my dad hasn't explored anywhere ever since Thanks for looking
  9. Belgium Old graveyard - 2014

    Took some pictures on a part of a big graveyard, with graves that are collapsing due their age. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6
  10. 1. Ship Graveyard 03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Ship Graveyard 02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Ship Graveyard 01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Ship Graveyard 06 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Ship Graveyard 05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Ship Graveyard 04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 7. DSC_0432_3_4_tonemapped by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  11. 1. IlluminatiGraveyard08 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 2. IlluminatiGraveyard03 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 3. IlluminatiGraveyardPanorama01 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 4. IlluminatiGraveyard02 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 5. IlluminatiGraveyard05 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 6. IlluminatiGraveyard06 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 7. IlluminatiGraveyard04 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr 8. IlluminatiGraveyard07 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr
  12. During a fantastic long weekend trip to Hungary with my close friend TBM, and after a long list of annoying failures (the secca in Budapest appears to be very good and in even the derpiest of derps, though usually fairly pleasant and accepting but insist they must let you go), we successfully explored this fantastic collection of Soviet and probably pre-soviet trains, most of them COLOSSAL! And all sadly left to rot in this Budapest depot. It was a relaxed day despite being nestled within the live grounds of a train depot, we kept to ourselves and no one seemed too bothered. I myself am not a huge trainspotter but adored this place. Some trains here have allegedly been used in Auschwitz!! Here we have it, the rotting Red Star trains of Communist Commuting. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 [ And finally…. Well it would have been rude not to when we were in an ex Soviet Union country, and many here who saw my Chernobyl report would have seen the Lada! So we rented this TWO STROKE Goddess TRABANT complete with tour guide who was able to assist with the odd column set up, and take us for some exploring! #A1 #A2 #A3 PM me for rental info, it’s cheap and fun! Anyways, more derpage at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157645948142370/
  13. UK Bus Graveyard June 13

    Bus Graveyard Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed
  14. Totally stumbled upon this place... if you hadnt stumbled across it or lived in the very close vicinity, then you would definetley not know this place was here. totally random location for a cemetery! In the middle of a field, surrounded by highland cows! Such a shame as the local "neds" clearly use this as a place to light fires when its cold, or just to sit, drink and wreck some gravestones!! anyways.... Rant over! haha A little history..... The old church of Cambusnethan stood in a most romantic spot at the southwest point of the whole parish, very near the river Clyde. It had certainly been built there for the accommodation of the Baron of Cambusnethan, so near his mansion house, and probably at his sole expense, there being no other heritor in the parish then but himself. The date of its erection is unknown but it was long before the barony was separated, and long before Thomas Lord Somerville gave to Lord Yester his first interest in the parish. It had a choir, and from the remains of it still visible, must have been a much more magnificent structure than the present one. It was, however, inconveniently situated for the parish at large, many of the parishioners, particularly those beyond Redmyre, having to travel from six to twelve miles to attend it. St Michael's Graveyard is the remains of Cambusnethan Parish Church, founded in St Nethan in the 8th Century. It is a few miles away from Cambusnethan Priory (which I did my first report on). The Mausoleum that is situated here was built for Robert Montgomerie Lord Belhaven and Stenton, Baron Hamilton of Wishaw KT. He was laid to rest here in 1868. His wife, Lady Belhaven, was also buried here in 1873. Probably David Rhind of Edinburgh, 1869. 3-stage, rectangular-plan, tall Roman style, sarcophagus mausoleum, aligned E-W. Segmental pediment enclosing deeply carved arms to coffered barrel-vaulted, fish-scale tiled roof. Polished ashlar yellow sandstone. Tall pedestal and roll-moulded plinth, plain rectangular 2nd stage, full Corinthian order entablature with husk garlands to frieze. The building was listed in June 1982, category B. Have no idea how a bike came to be here but never left...... can you picture death?? Wreckage...
  15. UK The Rusting Wolseleys... Jan '14

    I've done this one before but fancied doing it again now I'm on the HDR... A collection of about a ten old Wolseleys, left for the elements to corrode and nature to reclaim... Really nice place to waste an hour or so... 'The Rusting Wolseleys'
  16. I went to visit a local air show to grab a few shots and see what else was there. A lot of nice old cars sadly there wasn't much flying. When I left I decided to leave a different way. I could then see in the distance some old farm equipment. I thought I would take a closer look and this is what I found. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Thanks I hope you enjoyed.
  17. UK Tank Graveyard Oct 2012

    Out hunting and I spotted this through the trees. I think its part of a paintball site, on an airfield. It would of been rude not to grab a few shots 1 2 3 4 I think this was my favourite find.. 5 Sorry not many pics. Not much there, still good fun for an hour though.
  18. Thought i'd throw a bit of history up about the The Triumph Motor Company. (stolen off the net) The Triumph Motor Company was a British motor manufacturer. The Triumph marque is currently owned by BMW. The marque had its origins in 1885 when Siegfried Bettmann (1863–1951) and Moritz (Maurice) Schulte from Germany founded Bettmann & Co and started selling Triumph bicycles from premises in London and from 1889 started making their own machines in Coventry, England. In 1930 the company changed its name to the Triumph Motor Company. It was clear to Holbrook that there was no future in pursuing the mass manufacturers and so decided to take the company upmarket with the Southern Cross and Gloria ranges. At first these used engines made by Triumph but designed by Coventry Climax but from 1937 they started to make them to their own designs by Donald Healey who had become the company’s Experimental Manager in 1934. The company hit financial problems however and in 1936 the Triumph bicycle and motorcycle businesses were sold, the latter to Jack Sangster of Ariel to become Triumph Engineering Co Ltd. Healey purchased an Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 and developed an ambitious new car with an Alfa inspired straight-8 engine called the Triumph Dolomite. However the eight-cylinder engine was not used in the production car with the same name. In July 1939, the Triumph Motor Company went into receivership and the factory, equipment and goodwill were offered for sale. T.W. Ward purchased the company and placed Healey in charge as general manager, but the effects of World War II again stopped the production of cars and the Priory Street works was completely destroyed by bombing in 1940. In November 1944 what was left of the Triumph Motor Company and the Triumph brand name were bought by the Standard Motor Company and a subsidiary "Triumph Motor Company (1945) Limited" was formed with production transferred to Standard's factory at Canley, on the outskirts of Coventry. Triumph's new owners had been supplying engines to Jaguar and its predecessor company since 1938. Following a "considerable argument" between Standard-Triumph Managing Director, Sir John Black, and William Lyons, the creator and owner of Jaguar, Black's objective in acquiring the rights to the name and the remnants of the bankrupt Triumph business was to build a car to compete with the soon to be launched post war Jaguars. The pre-war Triumph models were not revived and in 1946 a new range of Triumphs starting with the Triumph Roadster was announced. Because of steel shortages these were bodied in aluminium which was plentiful because of its use in aircraft production. The same engine was used in the 1800 Town and Country saloon, later named the Triumph Renown, which was notable for the razor-edge styling chosen by Standard-Triumph's managing director Sir John Black. A similar style was also used on the subsequent Triumph Mayflower light saloon. All three of these models prominently sported the "globe" badge that had been used on pre-war models. When Sir John was forced to retire from the company this range of cars was discontinued without being directly replaced, sheet aluminium having by now become a prohibitively expensive alternative to sheet steel for most auto-industry purposes. In the early 1950s it was decided to use the Triumph name on sporting cars and the Standard name on saloons and in 1953 the Triumph TR2 was launched, the first of a series that would run through to 1981. Curiously the TR2 wore a Standard badge on its nose and the Triumph globe on its hubcaps. Standard had been making a range of small saloons called the Standard Eight and Ten and had been working on a replacement for these. The success of the TR range meant that Triumph was seen as a more marketable name than Standard and the new car was launched in 1959 as the Triumph Herald; the last Standard car to be made in the UK was replaced in 1963 by the Triumph 2000 . Leyland and beyond.. In December 1960 the company was bought by Leyland Motors Ltd with Donald Stokes becoming chairman of the Standard Triumph division in 1963. Further mergers led to the formation of British Leyland Motor Corporation in 1968. In the 1960s and 1970s, Triumph sold a succession of Michelotti-styled saloons and sports cars, including the advanced Dolomite Sprint, which, in 1973, already had a 16-valve four cylinder engine. It is alleged that many Triumphs of this era were unreliable, especially the 2.5 PI (petrol injection) with its fuel injection problems. In Australia, the summer heat caused petrol in the electric fuel pump to vapourise, resulting in frequent breakdowns of the 2.5 PI and TR6 models. While the injection system had proved itself in international competition, it did lack altitude compensation for the adjustment of mixture at altitudes greater than 3000 ft (1000 m) above sea level. The key reason for the Lucas system's unpopularity, was that Lucas was not inclined to further develop it on the one hand allied to the unwillingness of Standard-Triumph dealers to attend factory and field-based training courses dedicated to this propulsion method. For most of its time under Leyland or BL ownership the Triumph marque belonged in the Specialist Division of the company which went under the names of Rover Triumph and later Jaguar Rover Triumph apart from a brief period in the mid 1970s when all BL's car marques or brands were grouped together under the name of Leyland Cars. The only all-new Triumph model launched under Rover Triumph was the TR7, which had the misfortune to be in production successively at three factories that were closed - Speke, the Leyland-era Standard-Triumph works in Liverpool, the original Standard works at Canley, Coventry and finally the Rover works in Solihull. The four-cylinder TR7, its eight-cylindered derivative the TR8, and its still-born fastback variant the Lynx, were dropped when the Solihull plant ceased making road-going cars (the plant continues to build Land Rovers.) The last Triumph model was the Acclaim which was launched in 1981 and was essentially a rebadged Honda Ballade built under licence from Japanese company Honda at the former Morris works in Cowley, Oxford. The Triumph name disappeared in 1984, when the Acclaim was replaced by the Rover 200, which was a rebadged version of Honda's next generation Civic/Ballade model. The BL car division was by then called Austin Rover Group which also sounded the death knell for the Morris marque as well as Triumph. The trademark is currently owned by BMW, acquired when it bought the Rover Group in 1994. When it sold Rover, it kept the Triumph marque. The Phoenix Consortium, which bought Rover, tried to buy the Triumph brand, but BMW refused, saying that if Phoenix insisted, it would break the deal. The Standard marque was transferred to British Motor Heritage Limited, along with Austin, Morris, and Wolseley marques. The Austin, Morris and Wolseley marques were later sold to MG Rover Group Ltd, on the 10th December 2003. The Standard marque is still retained by British Motor Heritage who also have the licence to use the Triumph marque in relation to the sale of spares and support of the existing 'park' of Triumph cars. The MG marque was sold to Phoenix along with the sale of the Rover brand images and a licence to use the Rover name. The Rover name was later sold to Ford, with Nanjing Automotive gaining the rights to the brand image. The Triumph name has been retained by BMW along with Riley, Rolls-Royce and Mini. In late 2007, Auto Express, on the back of continued rumours that Triumph might return under BMW ownership, ran a story showing an image of what a new version of the TR4 might look like. BMW has not commented officially on this. thanks..
  19. Well this is the last place I'll be posting up from my trip north - I did visit one other placebut was pretty rubbish so may not even keep the pics never mind do a report. This was a permission visit to the country's biggest breakers of combine harvesters.The guys there were so friendly and charming and just left me to it. They are apparentlydoing very well indeed being very busy. Anyhoo here's the pics. -1--2- -3---4--5--6--7--8--9--10--11--12--13--14--15--16--17-
  20. Yet another little find i found quite by accident, loved this place. The old Fodens and Guy trucks were epic! Splored with Miss.anthrope [ Thank you muchlys for looking x
  21. Came across this field of cars after a day of failed splores, i was chuffed to bits. There is a history behind it but I cant go into to much detail, but by the sounds of it, it was an obsession that ended a marriage. It was a great mooch, loads and loads of cars, some older than others and none of them would ever pass a MOT again. But for me seeing Stasky and Hutch on the bus, made me a little bit happy!! Splored with Miss.Anthrope Thanks for looking x
  22. Not a lot of story behind this one, just a heap load of classic cars amongst the trees on a plot of land. Some of them have been there so long that the trees have grown through them, many of them have rusted so badly that they have collapsed into themselves in a brown mess of paper like metal
  23. The line from Shepherdswell to Eythorne was originally going to be a line running across flat land around a small hill, however due to disagreements with a landowner, the 550 yard tunnel was excavated to make the connection between the stations. Approaching from Shepherdswell, you find yourself in quite a deep cutting, and the tunnel itself has been bored wide enough to accommodate a twin-track, however only half the chalk was excavated inside the tunnel to save on costs. The tunnel officially opened for business in 1912, and closed 75 years later in 1987. The purpose of the line was to serve the freight purposes of the local collieries in and around the area, however passengers were also conveyed between Shepherdswell on the London, Chatham & Dover Railway’s Canterbury to Dover main line, to a junction at Eastry, from whence ran lines to Richborough Port and Canterbury Road. The line from Shepherdswell to Eythorne has subsequently been reopened by a train preservation society, who in the summer months, run trains from Shepherdswell to Eythorne. The train graveyard I presume, houses the trains that the preservation society drive to Eythorne and back. Sadly, some of these trains have seen better days, with grease still covering the wheels, they stand dormant, slowly depreciating hidden out of site behind Shepherdswell Railway Station. Others still seem in useable condition, and one of the trains had scaffolding up the side of it and was getting a new lick of paint. It is nice to see some people are not letting these fine examples of transportation go to waste. I dont think I could ever forget a trip to London as a child, starting off at Dover with the sound of 40 odd doors being slammed all at once.
  24. Not really UE but I thought I'd stick it up Hopefully Jesus will put up his pics too, I would say this was a photography exercise, but it really wasn't most of the time mine was on full auto and i wasn't bothering with the view finder hahaha. Point and shoot in the most literal sense I'm still quite proud of the results...

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