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Found 7 results

  1. The Grimsby Swimming Pool, know locally as Scartho Baths and usually pronounced “Scaffa Baffs” opened in 1962. The size of the pool was 110ft by 42ft with a depth range from 3ft to 6.5ft. The deepest section was in the centre, with a shallow end at each end of the pool. A barrier towards one end divided the pool into two – a 25m (half Olympic) area with 6 lanes, and a smaller area used for swimming lessons and specialist activities. To one side of the pool there was a 12.5ft deep diving bay which provided a springboard and a 3m high firm diving board. There also used to be 5m high platform, but this was removed many years ago. A large spectator area could seat 618 people. In 2008 a review was commissioned to examine the current and future usage of swimming facilities in the Grimsby area including both Scartho Baths and the pool at the nearby Grimsby Leisure Centre. The review recommended a rationalisation/replacement programme including the delivery of a single new facility with sufficient swimming pool capacity. A further survey of the condition of all leisure facilities was also carried out and this confirmed the high levels of expenditure required to replace essential plant and equipment at the end of its useful life, and to also maintain buildings over the next 5-10 years. As a result, a new swimming facility was built in Grimsby and Scartho Baths closed in December 2015. The Pool The place became Scaffolding Baths for a while too… Changing rooms and public areas Plant Room and Behind-the-Scenes Areas The plant room is where the water is pumped around, cleaned, heated and chlorine controlled. A tunnel extends from the plant room all the way around the outside of the pool, allowing access for servicing of the pipes that carry water to and from the pool. This tunnel runs all the way around the outside of the pool
  2. Can't really find much history on this place but was used for making ropes.. On with the photo's. Thanks for looking
  3. The Grimsby Ice Factory was built in 1901 to produce ice for the fishing fleets. At the time refrigeration techniques were in their infancy and it was not possible to build chilling units onto a ship. Instead, ice was produced in large quantities on land and distributed onto ships before they left port. The fish they caught could then be packed in ice for the return journey. Initially steam was used to power the factory, however as demand increased and the benefits of electricity were realised, the plant was upgraded to use electrically driven compressors in 1930. J&E Hall of Dartford, Kent undertook the task of replacing the refrigeration equipment and Metropolitan-Vickers of Manchester were commissioned to provide the electric motors. Four of the J&E Hall’s compressors were installed initially, and a fifth unit was added in the 1950s during a further period of expansion. At its height, the Ice House could produce 1,100 tons of ice per day. This made it by far the largest ice factory in the world. A decline in demand and new technologies for ice production led to the factory being scaled down in 1976. The factory closed down completely in 1990. 1. External 2. Compressor Hall 3. Compressor Hall 4. Compressors 5. Compressor detail 6. Compressor 7. Ice Tank Room 8. Ice Tanks 9. Ice Crusher 10. Ammonia Tanks 11. Valves 12. Compressor No. 5 I found some historic photos of the Ice Factory, so re-took the same shots to show a comparison of how it has changed. Many changes were made to the equipment over the years since these photos were taken, and the factory has become a mess since its closure.
  4. The Grimsby Ice Factory is a historic former ice factory that was constructed from 1898–1901 to provide crushed ice to preserve fish stored in ships at Grimsby's seaport. The Factory engaged in operations up to 1990. The buildings still contain some of the original historic machinery from times of the operations' origins. During its time of prime operations, it produced 1,200 tonnes of ice daily. The building is 4,350 square metres in size, and at one time was the largest ice factory in the world. The structure and equipment at the Grimsby Ice Factory site is an important part of Grimsby's fishing heritage.It is a Grade 2 listed building that is presently owned by Associated British Ports.It has been stated that some of the most important and largest refrigeration machinery in the world exists there. The site is managed in part by the Great Grimsby Ice Factory Trust. As of May 2014, the trust has plans to restore and renovate the site into a leisure complex that would include a pub, cinema and climbing wall. Part of the trust's plan includes retaining the machinery on the site for historical purposes. In 2014, the trust attempted to obtain £11 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund, but the request was denied. In March 2015, Grimsby residents suggested that the factory be covered to hide it from view during the upcoming World Seafood Congress event in September, with the rationale that the deteriorating building could denigrate the town's image. Graeme Bassett, secretary of the Great Grimsby Ice Factory Trust, suggested that the building could be covered temporarily or that scaffolding could be erected as a solution regarding concerns about the site being an eyesore. Today its still an eyesore and the building and contents slowly rot away, what happens next is anyone's guess. Information taken from my friend wiki, On with the photos Hope you enjoy the report, Mr T
  5. Did anyone see coast a couple of weeks ago, a worker revisiting a abandoned ice factory in grimsby? has anyone been inside it looks great, here is a little video of it I found on internet. Interesting place. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p017jcd5
  6. Back ground History, The cinema first opened in 1937 as the Regal with 1,966 seats, and was renamed the ABC in 1961. In 1966, the former stalls were converted into a supermarket, with the cinema occupying the original balcony area. By 1980, there were three screens, with 300 seats in screen one, 225 in screen two and 125 in screen three, and it went through a number of operators following that, including Cannon, Classic, and MGM, and was then known again as ABC, before becoming an Odeon in 2001, following a £100,000 rebranding scheme. The Odeon closed in December 2004 and Kwik Save in May 2007. It lay dormant for eight years before Shropshire businessman Trevor Harris renovated it and opened it as the Regal Cinema in August 2009. But it closed just weeks later, with Mr Harris saying it would cost tens of thousands more pounds to properly restore it to its former glory. Relaxing Explore Around for the Derelict Cinema, I had only been to this Cinema twice when it was in use the first Film i saw was Star wars and my very last film in 2009 when the cinema only lasted for 1 month was The Proposal Such a shame just after nearly 4 years this place has gone down very Quick with Water damage,theft & damage In the near future The cinema will be used as something else as the Old kwick save under the cinema is being currently turned into an in door Skate park. Was very dark inside! so some pictures will not turn out Great. ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr DSC02435 by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr DSC02387 by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr DSC02342 by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr ABC cinema Grimsby by simon_sanigar, on Flickr Thanks for looking
  7. Hello From Grimsby :)

    Would just like to take a moment to say Hello! my name is simon and am from Grimsby
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