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Found 84 results

  1. History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. The Bridge Hotel in the 50's Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. Pictures-
  2. It's always a great experience for an explorer like us, to visit places that we previously knew. This hotel is not really far away from where i live. When i was young, we usually went here on the lasts sundays of autumn for a walk... Surroundings are really beautiful and this small town is really charming. In the middle of it, this massive and luxiourious hotel / restaurant. Time flies, and this place getting really outdated... This place is now closed for 3 years, but we saw inside that he will be open again in few months. Enjoy !
  3. The Barbican Hotel in Lincoln was originally opened as a gentleman’s club in 1867. During the 1870s the building became the Albion Hotel, and was quite a prestigious place to stay in its time; an important early hotel which still retains original external features. During the 1980s the hotel was renamed to the Barbican. In 2006 eight people were rescued from a blaze started in a bedroom on the second floor. The Barbican Hotel closed during the 2000s and despite being purchased by developers in 2008 has stood empty ever since. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The entrance hall was quite nice... Note the dome shaped roof lantern in the bar... Some areas were suffering the neglect... And other areas were in good condition, and very hotely...
  4. UK Newport Towers Hotel

    Went back to see this place after i first visited a few years back and was sad to see the sorry state its in now (Apologies for me talking and the video was shot on a camera phone) http://www.urbanexboi.co.uk My Videos
  5. History Bridge House Hotel is a Grade I listed building, set alongside attractive gardens adjacent to the River Swale. The building was constructed sometime in the 15th Century and therefore provided a historic atmosphere inside and out. After being redeveloped into a hotel in the 1900s, the lower floors were converted into dining, bar and lounge areas. The upstairs was divided into bedrooms, and ensuite bathrooms were installed in each room. The hotel was popular as it is located close to the A1 road and Catterick Racecourse; it is also relatively close to the Yorkshire Dales National Park and the vibrant city of York. Unfortunately, however, a fire destroyed part of the building in 2014. Six fire crews were called to attend the scene after flames were spotted coming from the roof. The cause of the fire remains unknown, but no one was injured during the incident as the premises was closed as it was undergoing renovation. Our Version of Events For the past few days, Bridge House Hotel has been the cause of a wee bit of drama in the North East of England. So, sit down and we’ll tell you the story before someone else steals it and tries to make a film out of it. A couple of photographs of the Bridge House Hotel popped up several days ago on Facebook and, despite knowing the person who posted them, he wouldn’t spill the beans as to where we could find the building. He’s under the impression all yobs, thieves, vagabonds, unsavoury sorts, hooligans and graffiti artists regularly monitor 28dayslater 24/7, all biding their time as they wait for new locations to ruin. As far as we were concerned, the fact he didn’t want to share details was fair enough, he wasn’t obliged to share anything with us after all. As for posting on 28days, we tried to explain that these places get trashed eventually anyway, regardless of posts on the forum; of course 28days posts probably speed the process up occasionally, but so do snaps on Facebook and every other social media website... Even if you don’t post the name of the site, or the specific location, people will find it eventually. The person concerned is also under the impression that all 28days forum users are ‘egotistic dickheads’, and we’re part of that crowd apparently because we post on the site, so we’re not permitted to hang out with ‘proper’ explorers who prefer to ‘protect’ abandoned places. After that brief incident, we spent the next day or so researching the damn hotel, trying to find every single abandoned one in the North East and North Yorkshire (we guessed the pub was somewhere around these parts), mostly to prove the point that all locations are discoverable without the name and place; as we said before, the photo on Facebook is enough. There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to protect these places, but posting publically and then heavily criticising 28dayslater folk for revealing the name is, in our opinion, wrong. Posting images of any building on any site without a name doesn’t ‘protect’ them, it shows the world it’s out there and makes it desirable. It also doesn’t preserve the site for other explorers – one of the other arguments that was thrown at us – it does exactly the opposite. If anything, many more 28days users have their hearts, and mind-sets, in the right place when it comes to exploring and sharing amongst likeminded people, because they are willing to share and converse with one another. Anyway, eventually, after much internet trawling, we found the blasted place! It dawned on us at that point that we’ve driven past the fucking thing quite a few times, but we’ve always fobbed it off for being a shitty pub. We quickly grabbed a couple cameras and torches; whatever was lying around really, and immediately bombed down to the hotel in a rushed effort to beat the fading daylight that was hot on our tail. In hindsight, this wasn’t the best plan, as we only ended up bringing one SD card along, and half charged torch batteries which would inevitably run out during the explore. As we pulled up outside the hotel, we expected the ‘Facebook Clan’, armed to the teeth with cricket bats, spears and potato guns, to be guarding the premises. In anticipation that we might have a wee bit of confrontation (we all know how exploring folk like to hang around new explores they think they’re the first ones to ever enter), we recited the classic Braveheart speech: “they may take our lives, but they’ll never take our freedom…” and decorated our faces with blue stripes. Our efforts were all in vein, however, because, as it turned out, the place was silent when we rocked up. It only took a minute or two to find a way inside. A moist but pleasant derpy smell greeted us. At first glances, the place looked mostly intact and just as awesome as the photos had depicted; the bar and dining rooms were virtually untouched. Even more interestingly, though, the beers taps still worked, proving free glasses of slightly dated beer, and the wine cellar was still partially stocked. Having said that, there were far fewer bottles than the ‘Facebook Clan’s’ photos show. This could mean only one thing, the Greenpeace styled protectors weren’t protecting the place at all, they were drinking the bloody booze! Of course, this theory is entirely speculative, we have no evidence to support these claims – other than the diminished stock in the cellar and half empty (or were they half full) pint glass everywhere. Back upstairs, it also occurred to us that various objects had been moved around; the place almost looked as though it was staged, with armchairs, sofas and plant pots arranged in nice places. We’d assumed that professed protectors of sites like these might have put things back where they left them, to ‘preserve’ the place, but it seems this is a bit of a grey area. Again, however, our claims are entirely speculative; yobs could also have moved the furniture to make a temporary drug den or a brothel of some sort. Upstairs, most of the bedrooms were still in situ, and there was plenty of fresh linen. You could easily still grab a good night’s kip at this hotel. All the toilets still have their pipes too, which was a nice surprise. Unfortunately, though, it appears the yobs – or is it in fact the ‘Facebook Mob’ (a little rhetorical question right there) – have moved in, discovered what a Sharpie Permanent Marker can do, and started to tag the place. We found a fair bit of graff in a couple of rooms, especially in the kitchen. Caught in the moment ourselves, we must confess that we too became ‘wild hooligans’ for a moment, when we decided to rub the chalk board with the ‘Facebook Clan’s’ names on it a little bit with a Kleenex tissue. To our surprise, all the names rubbed off. It’s fascinating how easily chalk rubs off a board. After that, we may then have, purely accidently of course, scrawled our name in chalk over the top a little bit. Anyway, to move things along a bit, this little jovial act seems to have pissed a few exploring sorts off in our parts and subsequently shit has hit the fan, so to speak. As a result, anyone exploring in the North East may come now across some anti-WildBoyz graff, or graff that looks like it’s by our hand. To be clear, it’s not us, it’s ‘Facebook Clan’ ‘propaganda’. The moral of this story then folks: Thou shalt not piss off thee Clans of Facebook, or they shall feel the almighty wrath of the three Flickr, Twitter and Facebook kingdoms. Finally, to conclude this rant, we were originally going to post this report in a non-public thread, out of respect for certain people’s desire to keep it under wraps, but it hardly seems worth it since it’s all over Facebook now… Nice one ‘Facebook Clan’! As for the rest of you, go take a look at this place while it lasts if you’re in the area. All in all, while it’s certainly not worth a massive drive up, it’s a decent explore and we’d rather people saw it than pretend to keep it under lock and key. As we said to ‘the Clans in the North’, in a bit of an online dispute, exploring is about capturing a bit of history and sharing places with one another, it’s not about bitterness, jealousy and inhibiting everyone else from seeing them. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Box and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  6. The good old Ivy Hotel has finally bitten the dust..thee closest explore one could wish for being only a stone`s throw from my house.Some history to fill you in.... A charming not so little hotel in the village of Wroughton,that started out as Bed&Breakfast concern and went on to become rather large with 32 rooms.It went into administration in 2013 and has first suffered from squatters living there during 2014 to early 2015,then having the local morons go in and trash the place.I tried to gain a visit legit with the new owners but as per usual they hid behind Elf n Safety so I have waited and waited for the opportunity to see inside and today was that day so two fingers up to you new owners who plan on demolishing everything to build yet another Macarthy Stone luxury residence for wealthy peoples. The lovely frontage Master Bedroom The Conservatory now filled with squatters junk We check in at reception,well at least the battery does Harvey`s Bar how it used to look And today Dining Room in better days And today The Kitchens..very sticky and rank! Not too bad bathrooms One of the other 32 bedrooms In-House porno Out the back now..this car was originally put here to give the impression the site had security..it worked!!! In the grounds is Ridgeway Hall,a purpose built bungalow used for actual wedding ceremonies and receptions Inside Ridgeway Hall many years ago And today Well,that was the poor old Ivy Hotel..if you want to go room by room,have a look below but only if you are bored.Thanks for looking https://klempner69.smugmug.com/The-Ivy-Hotel-nr-Swindon-2016/
  7. A bit of history: this beatifull hotel has been built in 1936. it used to be a very luxurious place during pre ww2 times. It was an infamous place, with guests like: the british queen, Bjorn Borg and the belgian national football team. During the second world war it's purpose changed, no more fancy hotel, it was converted to the headquarters of the Germans up until 1944. After being retaken by the Americans it was used as a headquarters and barracks for nearby stationed reconnaissance pilots, who would coordinate the attacks against the v2 missile installations and sites. After the war it reopened an hotel, but 1978 the hotel closed and the ministry of education bought the place to be used as an all girl boarding school. The place closed down in 2011. my visit: it was a nice day in spring when i went there. After almost giving up hope on getting in there, i tried one more option. i had looked at it before, but i thought to myself that would have been impossible to open. Anyways we got in, started looking around, taking the pictures of what used to be the restaurant part of the hotel. nothing to fancy, but still nice. above the fire place used to be a plaque honoring the merits of this place during the war. they removed it so it wouldn't fall prey to vandals. next we ventured into the lobby. the bar and one of the other rooms. as you can see on the old picture, it used to be quite cosy. After these pictures we went upstairs, but i didn't have the chance to take more pictures. we saw 3 other men walking up to the place so we had to hide in the cellar. Turns out it was the real estate agent who would show people around. we didn't take any chances and just stayed hidden in the cellar. luckily the one shined there flashlight in the cellar while explaining something and then continued with their tour. We had to stay hidden for one more hour before we could make our escape. But, to be honest, the other levels of the building were a bit trashed.
  8. A 4 star hotel than left to shine, was used as a presidential suite shelter for Muammar Gaddafi in past. Today, is one of the firts stops for sirian citizens trying to enter Europe. Welcome to Jerma Palace Hotel. FULL REPORT: http://the-lostsouls.blogspot.com.es/2016/02/jerma-palace-hotel_8.html
  9. History: The Grand Hotel is a Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks St Philip’s Cathedral and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012. Before the 1870s, St Philip’s churchyard was surrounded with Georgian terraces. However, as a result of the Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861, the buildings were to be cleared for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. As the leases on the buildings on Colmore Row began to end in the late 1860s, demolition began. Barwick Street was constructed in 1870 and several plots of land bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street were acquired to create the site of the hotel. Isaac Horton, a major Birmingham land and property owner and his architect and builder, Thomson Plevins, were very active in the acquisition of the land and developing it in line with the 1861 Act. Plevins issued three separate contracts for the Colmore Row range of the hotel and construction work started in 1875 on the corner of Church Street. The hotel opened on 1 February 1879, with 100 rooms and a further 60 unfinished at the time of opening. Other facilities included a restaurant with an entrance fronting Church Street, two coffee rooms and stock rooms. The stock rooms were an exhibition space where businessmen could demonstrate their new products and were built as the hotel aimed to attract most of its clients from commercial visitors from out of town. The hotel was let to Arthur Field, a hotel operator from Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1880 the hotel was extended, when the corner of Church Street and Barwick Street was built. The Explore: So we took a spontaneous trip up to Birmingham to check out a few rooftops and we then remembered that the grand hotel was in fact, 2 roads away from where we were planning on going. So we decided to pull an all nighter and find this room; anyway we got in at around 4am and spent a good hour looking for the ballroom (actually it was a nightmare to find); anyway, once we had found it a few of us fell asleep leaving just 2 of us to enjoy its architecture! I find it shocking that this kind of building hasn’t been restored, my photos do it no justice. Anyway we spent about 3 hours taking our photos before stumbling to McDonalds for a well earned bagel and coffee. 100% would revisit. Being tired and hungry we didn't bother checking out the whole site and instead just went straight to the ballroom! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking!
  10. Interesting explore this “local†one was, I was amazed to find majority of the furniture and appliances still stored inside! Unfortunately our visit was cut short after setting the alarms off one too many times, so not many picture… not that anyone actually arrived, however we thought we had pushed our luck a little too much already. Here’s what little history I can find on the place. Set in a 17th-century country house, this conservative hotel is 2.2 miles from Harlow Mill train station and 7.3 miles from the Rhodes Arts Complex. The traditional rooms feature TVs, en suite bathrooms, and tea and coffeemaking equipment. There are 8 function rooms, verdant gardens and a restaurant with garden views on-site, plus a spa and leisure centre with a gym, an indoor pool and a sauna.
  11. The Visit Visited with redhunter on a lovely summers evening... on reflection I cant believe I actually got in there with the crazy things required to get in and get to the ballroom... Apparently lots of areas internally have been sealed now which made our path to the ball room very dangerous, anyone that attempts this in the future will know what I mean when they meet a big locked gate inside.. but once in I was literally speechless, what an incredible room that is !! The History The Grand Hotel is a Grade 2 listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1874. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012
  12. Belgium Chateau D'ambiance

    My first repo on here! Once upon a time, near a big city there was this big wealthy hotel/restaurant, full of chique guests, expensive food such as lobster and glamorous rooms. After the business went bankrupt, the owners couldn't find anyone who had interest to buy it from them. So now, nature is slowly taking over the grounds again. The exploring itself: After tumbling into the basement (I'm gracefull like that.. ) , we came into this huge wine cellar. Now let me tell you, I absolutely don't like basements, I always try my best to avoid them when I don't need to be in there. When we finally got upstairs, I was kinda suprised how dark some parts of the building were, while other couldn't be more open and alight. I absolutely loved what was left of the old glamour. When we were about to leave the building, the rest of our team wanted to go down the basement one last time, so I moved along on my own a little bit.. they came out a little bit creeped out but still laughing, apparently they came across another man down there; whose only words there: This would be perfect for SM. And disappeared Loved this part with the little wedding-ish look! Detail from the ceiling of the previous picture The corridor to the guest rooms. And last but not least; A picture of the wine cellar!
  13. Just one of those places i had to go and see for myself... copy n' paste history courtesy of historic england HISTORY: The Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861 cleared the way for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. The Great Western Railway had built Snow Hill Station in 1853, close by, and this was rebuilt in 1870. Leases on the Georgian properties in Colmore Row began to fall in by the 1860s and demolition started in 1870. A new road, Barwick Street, behind Colmore Row, was constructed in the 1870s with frontages which were mostly of brick and stone. Several separate plots of land were acquired to create the site of the current hotel which takes up the greater part of the block bounded by Colmore Row, Barwick Street, Church Street and Livery Street. Isaac Horton and Thomson Plevins, who was to become his architect, were both active in acquiring land and developing it in line with the improvements in the 1861 Act. The Colmore Row frontage was theirs by 1875, although the right hand portion came fully into their hands a little later. Thomson Plevins was architect and he issued three separate contracts for the building of the Colmore Row front and work started with the pavilion at the corner with Church Street. Next it extended to the right as far as the central pavilion. Lastly the balancing range and corner pavilion completed the symmetrical composition. The hotel opened in 1879 and a contemporary advertisement referred to "Commercial rooms, stock rooms and every convenience for commercial men... large rooms for dinners, weddings, breakfasts, meetings, arbitrations etc." There were 100 bedrooms, with 60 more unfinished at the time of opening, a restaurant with separate entrance in Church Street and 2 coffee rooms. The inclusion of Stock Rooms, where businessmen could demonstrate their products to each other, shows that the hotel was directed towards this market. Placed near to Snow Hill Station, the hotel aimed to attract commercial visitors from out of town. In the early 1880s the corner site on Church Street and Barwick Street was added to the hotel with a building of four storeys plus basement which was extended in 1894 by another 3 storeys. Also in the 1880s another large plot of land facing on to Barwick Street and Livery Street and turning the corner to connect with the Colmore Row facade was developed with a 5 storey block, called Great Western Buildings, of which a 4-bay section now survives on Barwick Street and is part of the hotel. In 1890, before the end of the lease the hotel appears to have failed and the building was handed back to the landlords. Hortons' Estates decided to re-order the interior of the Grand and newspaper reports spoke of £40,000 spent by the prominent Birmingham architects, Martin and Chamberlain. The Birmingham Daily Post recorded the hotel as "entirely reconstructed, decorated and furnished" and the Midland Counties Herald wrote that "although the external walls are retained, there is practically a new building on the old site, and all that remains of the old building is the facade on Colmore Row". The contractors were Barnsley and Son of Ryland Street North and the building was furnished and decorated by Norton and Co. of Corporation St. There was electric lighting to the public rooms and gas in the bedrooms. As well as the Stock Rooms and an arbitration suite there was a series of reception rooms called the Windsor Suite and a banqueting and ballroom. The grandest of all the reception rooms was built in 1894 when Martin and Chamberlain were asked to fill the remaining gap along the Barwick side of the site. They built a large new ballroom called the Grosvenor Room, together with a Drawing Room, arched internal colonnade and crush hall. The architects' drawings show that the ballroom was designed as a shell and the elaborate decoration was entrusted to decorators [perhaps Norton and Co. once more]. Five upper floors contained 75 new bedrooms. Other alterations at this time included 2 additional billiard rooms in the hotel basement. In the 1970s the architects Harper and Sperring undertook a modernisation of the interior and the exterior stone work on the Colmore Row and Church Street fronts was painted with a cement wash. The inclusion of rooms designed to appeal to businessmen was paralleled at the City Terminus Hotel, Cannon Street, London and the Caledonian Hotel, Glasgow. Amongst listed hotels in London, the Grosvenor, Buckingham Palace Road, the Russell, Russell Square are comparable in date and in their provision of grand public spaces, as is the former Midland Grand Hotel, Euston Road [grade I]and the Midland Hotel, Peter Street, Manchester [grade II*]. The Grand Hotel block forms one of the largest C19 buildings in central Birmingham. Within the overall urban context, and most particularly within its immediate neighbourhood, it makes a very positive and well-mannered contribution to the townscape. Placed in close proximity to James Archer's magnificent Church of St Philip [now the Cathedral], it achieves the difficult task of not dominating its smaller neighbour but still retaining individuality, most particularly by its distinctive skyline. The Barwick Street façade of the block designed in 1894 by Martin and Chamberlain is a fine work by this noted practice and shows an assured and interesting handling of masses. Inside are some especially fine original interiors including the principal staircase and, most notably, the rich and impressive French style decoration of the Grosvenor Room, Grosvenor Drawing Room and Crush Room. Elsewhere there is evidence of the Stock Rooms, which were an essential part of the original commercial accent of the hotel, as well as the rare survival of the shop interior at the Anatomical Boot Co.,25 Colmore Row. The special qualities of this building merit its listing at II*. oooh how original, a corridor with lots of light/dark contrast Even the building work that was never seen was cooler back then! seriously awesome studwork and this was the main reason for being here - The Grosvenor room needless to say the black and white below isnt my shot! these however are mine. one last look on the way out thanks for looking, take it sleazy kids.
  14. Another place I visited a year ago with Obscurity and 2 non members, an old hotel with a huge car lot and garage for repairs. Don't ask me why it's called Hotel B, I have no idea. Access was ridiculous, how nobody called the police on us is beyond me. Some nice features in this hotel and a few interesting bits and pieces out the back in the parking lot. Oh and a dead cat, like really really dead! No idea about the history, I'll let the pics tell the story. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Miaaaoooowwwww
  15. This is somewhat of a peculiar one! When this huge building was constructed in the middle of the 20th Century it began it's life as a hotel, in a great location by a beautiful river. As time went on and the fortunes of the city changed, the hotel business dried up due to declining clientele and it was bought by a nursing home company who decided to transform the former hotel into a sprawling 178-room care facility for the elderly and adults with special needs. In the basement were office and conference facilities as well as local TV and radio studios, and these vacated not long after the nursing home shut down. This place has rarely been explored before, it's always been sealed tight whenever my friend has checked it out. We were walking past it on the way back from somewhere else late in the afternoon and took a little detour through the site and the first thing I spotted once off the street was a wide open access point. It was too late and the building too large to explore with the daylight we had left so early doors the next morning we headed back inside. It's got a lot to see inside but as you can imagine with the size of the building and it's use it gets quite samey after a while. There is also evidence of recent squatters living inside in a couple of the rooms. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157659760861955
  16. So 2014 ended rather well exploring wise for me. Last day exploring of the year and I cracked this, the fails later didn't really matter History blatantly stolen from Wikipedia: The Grand Hotel is a Grade ii listed hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks the cathederal and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin and Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. I had come up with a couple of rather nice leads one you may of already seen on here a few weeks ago. I felt that my luck was in so I gave this lil beauty a shot. 3 am on my own I took the long drive to Birmingham. Upon arrival I wandered round and realised this was certainly no walk in!! Eventualy I was in unsure if I had full access as the heating was still on I went for a wander. I couldn't believe it I was in!! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. I am wandering around and for the life of me can't find what I came for, stripped room after stripped room. I take a seat on the stairs I need some help. Who else to ask but Google. I work out where the room is only to find padlocks and boarded up doorways. Eventually going up and down stairs I reach my goal. I give you the Grosvenor Room. 7. The problems not over yet. This is a tiny balcony and I am unsure on the strenght of the metal decoration. I have another wander and have no luck on finding any access. Heading back to the balcony I find some rope. I tie a few hoops into it and tie it to the balcony. Finally I am on the floor and I can enjoy this stunning room properly. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.
  17. History The site on which the Park International Hotel now sits on was originally occupied by a footwear warehouse, for Freeman Hardy & Willis Ltd. The site, like others across the city, also included lodgings for the company director and caretaker. By 1940, however, the warehouse had been completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe, after one of the heaviest bombing raids Leicester would ever experience during the war. Since much of the city was damaged in the aftermath, and more important redevelopment projects took priority, the site remained an abandoned wasteland up until 1955. The area was purchased and cleared of debris, although it wasn’t until the early 1970s that the main tower would appear on the city’s horizon. Like others at the time, such as Hallam Towers in Sheffield, the new property was designed to be a modern development that paid tribute to an era of prosperity. Nonetheless, as with most hotels, it changed hands several times throughout its lifetime and each time it was renamed accordingly. It is estimated that it remained as the Park International Hotel for the longest period of time. Over the years the hotel was a popular venue and it attracted many guests from other parts of the country. It was perhaps for this reason why the lower levels of the hotel were used to house the Leicester Exhibition Centre from the 1980s onward. The building finally closed down in 2009 owing to its declining reputation and inadequate structural integrity. During the 2000s there were several incidents where concrete had fallen from the structure onto the street below. Despite plans to repair the decaying premises, so that it could perhaps be converted into residential or student accommodation, no plans were ever approved. As the building has stood in a dilapidated state for many years, it has become too dangerous for property redevelopers to enter. Future plans now involve demolishing the site, to make way for new innovative city projects. Our Version of Events With only a few hours before Punk had to retire for the night *curfew – cough*, we decided that we’d still have time for a quick raid on the old Park International Hotel site. We’d heard rumours that access was particularly interesting so it caught our attention almost instantly. We’d also been itching to see Leicester from somewhere high. On the whole access wasn’t particularly difficult, but it was definitely entertaining. Inside, the hotel is absolutely fucked, so that was a little disappointing. Nevertheless, the rooftop view from the tower didn’t disappoint at all. From up there we could see for miles; it was just a shame we weren’t able to see it with all the lights switched on. Explored with Ford Mayhem, KM_Punk and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  18. Did this location on our trip in august through North Italy. One of the highlights on our trip, we did it in the very early morning, because we had a tight schedule that day. Could have easily killed a few hours in there, but after two hours we had to go... Thanks for watching
  19. Italy noms. On arrival here we began to doubt if we'd gain entry as it looked like things had changed around the perimeter of the building. Our original access wasn't looking possible, but persistence paid off and we got to see this gigantic place The main highlight of the hotel is the ballroom and there are also a couple of nicer rooms Around there too. I spent most of my time downstairs, didn't really bother to shoot the rest as I'd expected it to be repetitive and boring as most hotels are once above the lower floors. Anyway, photos: Cheers, SM
  20. The large hotel with several accommodation wings and surrounded by an old park was built in the nineteen-twenties. The spa centre in the hotel used water which was particularly rich in mineral salts. The Hotel was closed about 2007. It took a while until we found an open access. After about four hours, workers (or whoever, two men in white coats) came into the building and we had to get out quickly, but we have not been seen. But, unfortunately, therefore we could not explore everything inside. Part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  21. Keeping this one quiet, though has been closed for quite some time sitting in plain sight for a lot of Hertfordshire folk. That’s the only clue I am giving 😉 I checked this place out twice a while back and found no access points, but after returning with the usual urbex family and finding a somewhat rickety ladder, we found our way in! Once again on the same day as our QE2 splore, another one with power still on!
  22. Yup thats right ANOTHER alla italia report, same ceilings, same pillars, same copper bath rar rar rar. always loved the look of this place and was fairly near the top of the list for our little roadtrip, have to say as beautiful and grande the place looks its a shame its all fake as shit!, on the way over raw told me about the "painted ceilings" peeling away at the corners which says its obviously a print, the balcony railings are plastic and the pillars are marbled plaster-which to be fair faux marbling is a skill in itself, basically its a painting technique which involves applying the paint with a feather to imitate the veins in marble. fake or not it's still a very photogenic building, unfortunately i was wielding a pissed lens so i had to make do taking pics at weird angles until jane was done and could lend me hers to do some symmetrical stuff. previously a health spa in the centre of a rather posh town in belgium, as far as i know plans are for it to be turned into a hotel. -highly recommend the gorgonzola steak at the italian joint over the road on with the picturegraphs thanks for looking kids, rave hard but rave safe.
  23. Germany Mini rooftop hotel Germany (visit 2015)

    Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr
  24. Germany Hunters Hotel (June 2015)

    I visited this place 3 times now and every time I saw new spots Maybe because the keeper is always moving things... Anyway, it's a good place to visit for a few bucks He is a really friendly guy and he always give you something to eat after your visit. You also can rent a room for a night! So here are some pics
  25. Deep in Germany we found this beauty sleeping. The color of decay are so awesome .

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