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  1. A large hospital,build in the 60's and will be demolished soon. It was one of the hospitals where they also removed the lamps and tables in the OK room. But still a nice location for a Saturday with a nice staircase. More can be found on my flickr page. http:// https://www.flickr.com/photos/94301594@N07/albums
  2. Found this place by comparing a vague YouTube video and some info I've found here and there, then confirmed with Google maps satellite. Place was pretty big, but unfortunately pretty destroyed by vandals over time. Here are some pictures I took on my scouting trip there. Will go back for more/better shots.
  3. Hi everyone! This is my footage of Battle Hospital in Reading. I visited in May 2018 and the explore went extremely well as we managed to search the entire site without any interruptions and oh my what a place to explore! A Little History The site was created in 1867 as a Workhouse which went on to be known as the Reading Union Workhouse. They added an infirmary to the site between the years of 1889 and 1892 which added the space for an extra 185 beds! Amongst the First World War it was then known as the Reading War Hospital. It was then in 1930 that it became Battle Hospital but it's not over quite yet as in 1952 they built a new maternity unit which was known as Thames Block and then in 1972 they built a new block called Abbey block so by 1993 Battle Hospital was able to accomodate 280 beds however this was not great compared to the 760 beds at Reading's other hospital, the Royal Berkshire Hospital. It was then in 2005 that Battle Hospital closed it's doors for the final time with all the patients being transferred over to the Royal Berkshire hospital in a new block which would be known as Battle block. Thanks for reading! Hopefully you found something of interest
  4. Red Morgue Hospital History I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. Visit Visited with @darbians on a weekend trip to Belgium. I was really keen to see this one after finding out about it and seeing a few photographs. It was great to see an old hospital in fairly good condition with some items still left, combined with a nice bit of decay. As always, hope you enjoy my photos 😄 (Spot the rookie error 🤣) If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  5. I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  6. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  7. History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients. The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute. During World War I, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital. During World War II, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, US Army and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients. On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. It continued to be used through to the mid-1980s, when care in the community began to reduce the number of resident patients. The decision was made to close the hospital as it was no longer deemed suitable for patients. Closure of the hospital is today, 29th April 2016. The Explore As always, explored with my better half @hamtagger . This place had become a little bit of a fixation to us. Knowing as most of you probably did that closure was imminent we decided to pay it a visit. The hospital recently had an exhibition showing the history of Whitchurch and it had finished a week before our visit, only downfall is we would have got to see the hall but where is the fun in being allowed in somwhere! This place had 10 wards, they are huge wards, built on 2 floors. When we visited only 2 of those wards were in use on the East side and they were the secure unit which were moved to the new Llandough Hospital earlier this week. 90% of the site is disused. On site there is a funeral home and a hospice both of which are still and will still remain active now that the hospital has closed. The whole site is pretty vast, the corridors are long and echoey, we never saw a single person while walking around the main sections. The wards were all closed and padlocked off inside but this didn't really bother us too much. We just enjoyed sneaking round capturing it like it is now. HT said to me wouldnt it be nice to look back on these pics in years to come and see what it did look like. A severalls in the making if nothing happens with it. As you can see not a lot was accessible but it wil give you an idea of what it is like. Parts of it reminded me of Goodmayes Asylum in Essex, it had that feel to it. Especially with working lights and the colour of red on the windows and doors. The place hadn't been looked after which was a shame really. Decay had allready started. Some corridors were closed off due to colapsing ceilings. The water tower was locked off because of Aspestos. Reading a story online, millions had been spent renovating one of the concrete rings on one side of the tower only a few years ago. The building is beautiful. Red brick with a single line of yellow brick right through the middle. The grounds are just as nice, old flowerbeds now overgrown but still spring flowers coming through. On our way out we were met by Security at the main desk, we explained to him that we were just looking at the buildings. Luckily we were on our way out and he told us that he didn't mind us taking externals so there was our chance to walk around the whole site externally. I got chatting to him and asked him about his job. He explained that he had started working for the gardens when he was 17 as a stopgap before he found something else to do, 44 years later he is still there. I could see the bond he had with this building with the closure ahead. He was emotionally attached to it, you could see the sadness in his eyes when he talked about it. He talked to us about the cannabis factory that was found a few years back in one of the derelict wards. He laughed when he said that staff thought he was behind it. All in all really nice to speak to him, someone with knowledge. So really a maze of corridors to see and a lot locked down, this place has a mortuary but I am led to believe that it's 50/50 as to wether there is a slab inside it still. I am told that it is stored for gas bottles. The main hall is amazing but I only got to see it through cracks in the doors. Currently being used for storage of medical records and equiptment it was heavily locked. Whitchurch has a lot more to offer but for us its a waiting game until it becomes more accessible inside. In particular I loved the Matron's door. This place had a lot of original features left and this was one of them. Anyway enough of my waffle, I am sure that many of you will vsit this place in time. On with the pics Externals An aerial view of the whole site, arrow plan. 1 : The Main entrance 2 : The Pavillions had seen better days 3 : Westside, Innit bruv! 4 : One of the smaller villa's on site, more recently being used for admin 5 : One of the secure Units for the higher risk patients 6 : 7 : East Side 8 : Some more of the East side 9 : The external of the curved corridor 10 : 11 : The Internals 12 : 13 : 14 : 15 : 16 : 17 : The corridor Kink 18 : A bit of artwork from a former patient 19 : 20 : The corridor which led you to the Mortuary & Tower, sadly closed off 21 : Sad times for Whitchurch 22 : The main entrance 23 : A little history from when it was a military hospital Thanks for looking!
  8. I first visited this former mental hospital back in June 2012 and alot has changed since that time ...some good some bad. This hospital started it's life in the 1920's and closed in 1994. At it's largest capacity it had 5,818 patients. Like many other state hospitals in the U.S it had it's own farm , laundry, bakery, refrigeration plants etc and various other buildings were built in later years such as a chapel and larger separate hospital built in 1966 for infirm patients which had, an operating room, laboratory, diagnostic equipment, clinics, medical library and mortuary. When I first visited here it was overgrown with poison ivy, tall grass....just unkempt and relatively easy as no one seemed to be watching it. There were plans to convert it to senior housing but that never happened and in 2013/2014 a group bought it to convert it into a college. I had planned to visit about that time when a friend who visited said they'd already taken out the morgue contents of the larger building. He also said they'd oddly started fixing up the auditorium but other things left untouched. He also discovered had started doing illegal abatement and word got out and they were shut down. It still sits partially abated which gives a new look to what I'd seen before but it also took away some of the charm. I of course wanted to see the big morgue when I went back...whenever that was I wasn't sure. Well last summer I was able to get back and the place is much trickier to do since there's a damn security guy 24/7 who seems to make usual rounds. All the doors have been screwed shut with the exception of a few....of course way out in the wide open. We got there very early in the morning so I took a few night shots. I might add the old morgue thankfully is still there in the older hospital building although all the doors have been taken. I would like to add that this place is sheer hell due to the tunnels which I didn't need to use in 2012 (since we were able to freely walk around) and is most known because of these horrific tunnels LOL. You basically are crouched in some while going down or up very steeply (depending on how you enter the campus) and are narrow as well as filled with the white crap (most likely asbestos) from the pipes that have fallen on the floor. I did not enjoy them at all and we actually left earlier than I wanted because we were both exhausted from carrying the heavy backpacks and navigating the tunnels trying to find a new way out so we didn't go back up the tunnels. I plan to go back though and get pics of things we missed. So here are some pics from my early visit which are crap. I can't re-edit them due to losing them via the cat who knocked the external HD to the floor a couple years ago. I was not a good photographer of buildings back then as I came from nature so this "architecture" was a whole new game for me. I struggled a bit with composition and lighting.....and used a fisheye at times Unfortunately I don't have the same pics of old trip of auditorium to compare with how it is now. I never edited and uploaded the old ones Forgot to add I stopped by in the winter last year to take a few exteriors hence the snow pics
  9. One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  10. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  11. Ida Darwin Hospital, Cambridge, September 2017/Jan 2018 Another year, another one of Landies big backlogs! I first did this site back in September with a non-explorer friend. It was pretty boring overall and the one building which looked any good, turned out to be inaccessible. I later heard the warped door round the back needed a bit of extra tug; but was open! Doh! I kept hold of the photos until I returned in January of this year with another non explorer and went for the more intact building! Sadly upon arrival; we found the nice part of the hospital to be completely trashed! Double Doh! Still, it was a day out and good to be in somewhere. The hospital is partly live, but seems to be closing at a fair rate of knots. Way back in the late 19th century; people with brain injuries and single mothers were referred to as "feeble minded" and local authorities were to provide public asylums to house those deemed to be "pauper lunatics". Fulbourn Asylum was opened in 1858 for the feeble minded people of Cambridge to be kept in as it was considered that those people should be segregated from the rest of society. By the 1960s, the need for provision of dedicated care and support of the mentally handicapped people in the area was noted. The below site was chosen by The East Anglia regional Hospital Board; next to the Fulbourn mental hospital. The then new hospital site catered for 250 residents and the aim was that the facilities would enable each resident to maximise their greatest potential. The hospital was named Ida Darwin and has been slowly closing down over the last couple of years. There was also a weird poo room where someone had turned a table on its side and had been going behind the table turned over. Perhaps someone living rough here. #1 #2 #3 #4 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 As Always, thanks guys! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693924924014
  12. In this video we are exploring an abandoned asylum which opened in 1930 and closed in 1997. I hope you liked the video!
  13. First did this location couple of years ago its a real nice spot as we were in the area it would have been rude not to revisit ..... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 18. 19. 20. 21. Cheers for looking Oldskool ..............
  14. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  15. This is Manicomio Di V (Mental asylum). The hospital was built in 1930 due to growing demand for mental support in the region. The hospital closed in 1991 due to new laws. [ The overgrown church [ The entrance of the theatre The decaying theatre The old projector Fences to prevent patients escaping or committing suicide The overgrown roads through the facility The entrance of the shower building The shower rooms Decaying bathroom Picture of one of the patients This was the section were alcohol addicted people would be taken care of Old poster of a Lancia Prisma Backstage the theatre The stockroom One room were the patients would sleep a couple of phones thrown in a corner Thanks for looking!
  16. A bit of a pain in the back side to get in this one, they have really made an effort with those fences! There was no security though, once you find a way past the doubled up security fences it's smooth sailing. We did find one particular part of this place rather creepy, there is a rotten bed in a dark basement that was quite eerie and had a different feel than the rest of the decaying building. More information will follow on our website in a day or so.
  17. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  18. What a beautiful old girl. Managed to get a few pics before the bulldozers came. Wish I had gone sooner and had a sneaky peek inside.
  19. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  20. We visited St John's Hospital in Lincolnshire on Sunday, here is our video. Although we were told the security at the hospital was extremely tight we didn't actually come across any security at all! They must have been having a day off lol.
  21. Lovely buildings, could only get a look at the wards etc that are still open. But still managed to have an internal walk areound. The older building still stands but no access was possible. Note the padded seclusion room at the end.
  22. OK, I said on the other thread I would add the older pics of B Block. I also have ones from admin the year before as well. No point boring with history yada yada as it was on the last thread. Visited with DK and IO a couple of times. Admin: DSC02755 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Where admin used to be DSC05467 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC02713 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Window DSC02724 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Large Ward DSC02731 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Side Room DSC02733 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Top of the Stairs DSC02736 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Theatre DSC02741 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Little Room with lovely Window DSC02744 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The Dark Ward DSC02747 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Map DSC02750 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External DSC02754 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr B Block: Looking out to A Block DSC05427 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Festering mounds of Pigeon Shit DSC05428 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward DSC05429 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr 'That' Doll DSC05431 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stuff DSC05445 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr TTW DSC05452 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Empoty Room DSC05458 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The O2 Can DSC05462 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Chair DSC05463 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Klaus Wunderlich DSC05469 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Retro DSC05470 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr One Last External DSC05475 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  23. Ok, first post on here, so hope you enjoy. Just a small explore from middle of last year but an interesting little one one nonetheless. The Royal Victoria closed bit by bit over the last few years, finally becoming empty last year. Each time we pitched up there was always something still active so we accidentally left it a bit too long without checking. Big mistake, the neds burnt half the place to the ground and a sh!tload was demod to make it safe. Anyway, we managed to explore a good but of it but only took photos of the main block. The old Victorian building despite looking externally brilliant - has been so modernised inside there is no hall anymore - just a bunch of admin rooms. Enough babbling - on with the pics Main Entrance _DSC2237 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Inside the Main Entrance _DSC2229 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Staircase _DSC2228 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Sink anyone? _DSC2227 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward _DSC2224 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spotless Ward _DSC2222 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spine Corridor _DSC2221 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Mural _DSC2216 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Bed _DSC2214 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Smashed Ward and Bed _DSC2205 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External _DSC2239 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  24. Found a few more of St.Ebbas, nice to see these again, lots peeling paint and random bricks coming through doors lol:- Enjoy Just found this pic and I luv it lol:-
  25. Just a few pics from here, this was a great day out.
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