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Found 364 results

  1. Visited with a non forum member - This hospital is part of a large former military camp which was taken over by the Red Army in 1945 until they left in 1990. Since then it has sat empty, slowly decaying. In my time I've happily wandered around many abandoned places with no bother including 4 different asylums on my own but, I'm not kidding this place really gave me the creeps. Evidence on the walls of the unmistakable Soviet presence once here - Till next time....be seeing you!
  2. History The first written record of a workhouse in Hexham, which was more of a prison by contemporaneous standards, dates back to 1777. It was a relatively large establishment for its time as it was capable of housing up to fifty-five inmates. In the report it is noted that the governess was named Mrs. Hutchinson, and that she supported every pauper at the weekly rate of two shillings and six pennies (approximately twelve and a half pence in today’s currency) per head. However, following the founding of the Hexham Poor Law Union in 1836, a new Hexham Union workhouse consisting of three parallel two-storey buildings was constructed in 1839, by J. H. Morton, on the south side of Dean Street. Like most other workhouses, the daily regime was brutal and the establishment was feared by those outside of its walls (this was to deter able-bodied people from applying). Everyone, regardless of age or sex, was required to work, doing jobs that would often lead to exhaustion and ill health. What is more, the food, uniform, medical care and education tended to be inadequate, and once incarcerated inside the workhouse families were often split up and punished if they attempted to communicate with one another. The Hexham Union workhouse underwent major alterations and refurbishment in 1863, when detached schools were built. Conditions for children gradually began to improve from this point on, with an 1866 report noting that ‘the boys dig and plant the garden; the girls sew and knit’. Further development between 1880 and 1883, at a cost of £8,000, saw the construction of an administration block, a Master’s house, a dining room (the room with the murals from 1885 which may be attributed to E. Swinburne) and sick wards on the eastern end of the site. Standards within the accommodation blocks were improved, although people were still separated and divided into various classes of ‘inmate’, and the capacity was increased to accommodate 300. The finely carved stonework of the Master’s house, which is positioned just above the entranceway, still exists today. After 1930, the workhouse became Hexham Public Assistance Institution, following the abolishment of the workhouse system. As with a large number of workhouses at the time, Hexham workhouse became more of a refuge for the elderly, sick and infirm, rather than the able-bodied poor. In other words, it became a kind of municipal hospital. Nevertheless, during the Second World War part of the site was appropriated for military administrative use. After the war, though, in 1948, the site became part of Hexham General Hospital, and was used as a hospital up until 2004, when new modernised buildings were opened nearby. The hospital continued to use part of the site to store equipment and paperwork, but the rest was sold to Helen McArdle Care Ltd. and later leased to The Therapy Centre in 2013. Today, however, all of the buildings across the site have been abandoned. Since they were rendered derelict at different stages, some parts of the site have deteriorated badly on account of vandals, metal thieves and water damage. As things stand, local residents have launched complaints surrounding the poor condition of the site. Some have called for the former workhouse to be demolished as it is said to pose a risk to the general public. So far two serious plans have been proposed: one by Lidl who are interested in demolishing the site to provide space for a large supermarket, and a second by a housing company that promises to build affordable homes and private residential units for elderly people. It is rumoured, however, that the council are open to further ideas, particularly ones that look to salvage some, if not all, of the former workhouse site. Our Version of Events After hearing about a potential explore over in Hexham, we decided to go take a look. Assuming it was going to be an average sized site and that we’d be able to cover it in a few hours, we headed over late one evening after a bit of tea (not the drink). As it turned out, though, the explore was a former workhouse, so it was fucking huge. It was also a bit like a maze trying to work our way through the buildings because we had to content with locked doors, boarded windows and lots of discarded shit lying all over the place. This meant we didn’t have time to wander round the entire thing on our first visit, so we finished it off on a second trip a couple of days later. At first, despite being satisfied with the age of the building, the old workhouse proved to be a bit of a shit wander. The first few rooms we poked around in were beyond stripped. For example, even the floorboards in the corridors seemed to have been knicked! But, things started to improve once we stumbled into the middle section of the building which, as records suggest, was part of the new 1883 development. From here on in there was plenty of stuff to take photos of. We entered the dining room first and quickly discovered the old murals on the wall to our right. As for the rest of the room, it had been transformed into a medical records room, according to the sign on the door. From the dining room, we found we had to traverse across part of the roof, which was a bit of a sketchy experience as the whole thing was covered in ice. This was the only way to reach the third part of the site though. The other route was blocked by a room brimming with old zimmer-frames, mattresses, chairs and other bits of medical equipment. It’s no wonder the NHS have shortages – half of Britain’s medical apparatus is in that room. Anyway, back to the explore. We skated our way across the roof to reach a smashed opening on the other side. It led into a stairwell, and since we were quite high up from the steps we had to lower ourselves inside and drop in. The building we’d entered was noticeably different from the rest of the site, in the sense that it was fairly modern and had clearly been refurbished in recent years. But, before we could take in the surroundings any further, the pair of us heard something. It was the subtle sound of a ‘beep’. Then, two seconds later, it suddenly went ballistic, even though we’d not moved from where we were stood and couldn’t see any motion sensors. A little confused, we proceeded down the stairs to find out what the fuck was going on. As it turned out, the alarm must have been triggered by the last visitors – the fuckers who appeared to have walked around smashing the place to bits – and it seemed that no one had turned up to sort it out. The alarm continued to go off sporadically the entire time we were there anyway; it would randomly stop, then start again regardless of whether we walked past a sensor or not. What we did find amusing in all of this, though, was that the previous visitors to the site had tried to cover up some of the sensors with pieces of paper and leaflets, presumably to stop them from being detected… We spent less time in the alarmed section that we would have liked, but we did manage to get around the entire thing without anyone turning up. So we felt pretty successful in that respect. After that, however, we made a hasty exit, just to be on the safe side. We exited the same way we managed to get in, and to finish off decided to get a couple of external shots. And just in time too, or so we thought, since the police decided to rock up. Nevertheless, as it turned out they didn’t seem to be after us. Later, after having a chat with a local, we learnt that police presence has been increased in the area because of vandal and thieves and subsequent complaints from residents. So, rather than attending to the alarm, they were probably just doing the routine rounds to keep the local populace happy. Explored with Meek-Kune-Do. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  3. History Wheelbirks is a small rural part of Northumbria, located to the south of Hadrian’s Wall. According to several historical books, there have been farmsteads in the area since the 16th century. It was David Richardson, though, who would have the greatest influence in transforming the area. Richardson, who was a Quaker and the owner of some of the largest tanneries in the country, moved to the area in 1882. The family has a long history as tanners, tracing as far back as the mid-16th century to a site based at Great Ayton, Cleveland, so they had a considerable amount of wealth and influence. In 1902, Richardson started work on replacing the original farmhouse at Wheelbirks with a Restrained Gothic style farmhouse and several small cottages. By 1911, the area was completely transformed, having changed from a small farmstead into a fully-fledged estate. Further development was prompted a few months after completion following an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) inside Richardson’s tanneries. During the early 1900s, for instance, the works located at Elswick were reported to have a high incidence of the disease. The sanatorium itself is a cruciform construction of steel-reinforced concrete, white engineering brick and glass. It was designed to appear as if it is standing on stilts in a hollow; three bridges attached to the main entrances of the building helped to create the illusion. The design of the structure, which is reportedly American-based, and its chosen setting is said to have comprised a fresh-air method of treatment whereby patients would be surrounded by countryside and a clean, unpolluted environment. Unfortunately, Richardson never witnessed the completion of the sanatorium because it remained unfinished at the time of his death in 1913. In the end, the building was never used to treat TB sufferers because developments in antibiotics led to important changes in how TB was treated, to the extent that the use of isolated hospitals was rendered unnecessary. Today, the sanatorium is in a dilapidated condition. The interior is badly damaged and almost completely stripped, and the outside is clearly showing its age. In addition, one of the entrance bridges appears to be missing; there is some evidence that one existed on the western side of the building. Despite its condition, there is evidence that a local farmer has commandeered the space, using it as a storage site for various pieces of farm equipment and a random collection of boats. Our Version of Events Prior to visiting the Wheelbirks TB Sanatorium, we were warned that some stealthy moves would be required as there is an active farm overlooking the premises. With this is mind, we parked several miles away and decided to have a wander through the woods, to approach the building from the rear. Taking the necessary precautions, we camo’d up, slapping on a few streaks of black paint across our cheeks that we happened to have lying around for full effect. The walk that followed was itself quite pleasurable as we navigated our way along the side of a stream that runs close by the sanatorium. If anything, with tripods in our arms it felt a bit like we were stalking a predator (the extra-terrestrial kind, not a paedophile). Thankfully we weren’t, though, because if one really had been skulking around alongside us our attempt to fend it off would have been a very shit addition to the sequels. The building appeared all of a sudden, lurking behind a thin cluster of trees just ahead. It was just as everyone has described it: American. It was certainly different, but I can’t say it struck us as the most aesthetically pleasing building in England. However, before we could stand in awe for any longer, as we were peering out from the treeline, we suddenly noticed that the pre-warnings about the farm next door and there being lots of activity were quite accurate. The farm was a veritable hive of activity, with cars coming and going and a hardened sentry equipped with a set of heavy-duty binoculars sitting on the roof. What is more, just ahead in the next field there appeared to be a shooting party. It wasn’t very clear what they were shooting at, but they all looked the business with their flat caps, tweed jackets and 4x4s. Taking care not to get shot, we crept up to the old sanatorium waving a fresh Kleenex tissue for good measure. From there, choosing a point of entry wasn’t particularly difficult as all the doors were either missing or wide open. Once inside, it was immediately apparent that local farmers and the nearby ice cream parlour are using the site as a makeshift storage facility. Unfortunately, they don’t seem to be storing any ice creams in the big freezer though. That’s right, we checked. The main floor, which I would assume is the ground floor (the design of the building is a bit odd having been constructed in a hollow), is filled with bicycles, boats and farm equipment. Downstairs is being used in a similar way, although a lot of the gear down there appears to be quite dated. As for the upper floors of the building, they are absolutely fucked. With the sheer number of holes in the walls, it would appear as though the guys over in the field are in much need of some target practice. There is only really one room that might be of interest to anyone passing through, and that is the one filled with old-ish whisky bottles and newspapers. We decided to call it a day after taking a quick look around the upstairs rooms. There wasn’t much left to see, and the group of would-be mercenaries in the field opposite seemed to be packing up to leave. The first few land rovers were already leaving the field and forming a Mad Max style convoy. The last farmer who was closing the gate even seemed to have a large speaker system mounted on the back of his Toyota Hilux. We ducked beneath a window ledge for a moment as the convoy roared past us, then when everything went quiet again headed back towards the woods to face our trek back to the car. Explored with LightSaber. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  4. Back again for my third visit! This one was definitely the best and as such the most worth sharing on here. This place is huge - I'm certain there's many bits that I haven't seen yet. Visited with @TheVampiricSquid @Biebs and @MrObvious I'll spare you the history as it's very easy to find and cut straight to the explore story... Well basically I was wanting to do another revisit for a long time, but never quite got round to it. It had been 11 months since my last visit, so I was itching to get back - especially seeing as it was so much fun last time playing hide and seek with the Police and such! I got chatting to Squid one day, he asked me if I was free and I just ended up going for it. It was one of those spur-of-the-moment, opportunist situations and the whole thing unfolded beautifully and we ended up having a great night! I reckon we must have spent about 14 hours on site in total, give or take an hour or so when we got pinched, grabbed a kebab and went back in again! Shots I got were a bit mixed in quality, but different nonetheless... First stop, the labs... Having a look at the gym on the way through. It was all pretty stripped compared to my first and second visit. God knows what it's like now. Scanner. Onto the roof. At this point in time the explore is taking it's toll a bit and we're all getting rather drowsy, so we go to the "Chill Room", have a couple of beers and start pondering whether to get some shut eye. Then Biebs mentions the X-Ray area and we decide to march down there and get some more shots. We crash out soon after that and wake up feeling reasonably fresh. Video: More general pics can be found on my Flickr. On our way out we bump into Squid's secca nemesis Brian who remarks "I suppose you think you're clever do ya!?". I was hoping for more of a confrontation for the LULz, but to my disappointment he just stood there and gave us the evils Fantastic night on the whole. Many thanks to Squid, Mr.Obvious and Biebs for showing me around and helping me out Thanks for looking.
  5. Germany

    Finally, my third visit was successful! A nice little loophole down a light shaft enabled us to enter the maze of corridors... The typical "hospital smell" is in the air. Stale air, mixed with the smell of sanitizers. Involuntarily, I hold my breath. After all the years of abandonment, that smell in particular makes the former hospital life tangible. We start exploring the bowles of the giant. Blinking lights and silent noises accompany us. Suddenly - in the cellar - the predominantly silence is killed by a comparetively deafening noise - the airing is still working very well. All these aspects still revive the old complex simply add to the haunting atmosphere. Personally, I permanently expect stumbling across a doctor, a nurse or a patient around every corner. Yet, nothing happens. All the people who once filled the walls with life are gone long time ago. Only the noises of the building, which is still kept alive like a last patient, are still there. It´s still working in its bowles, although its days have already been counted. Consequently, the heat in the former and still working heating plant hits you as soon as you open the door. Here, too - noise and blinking lights as far as the eye can see. A bizarre view in a building, which no longer serves any purpose. Also very strange to feel is the severe difference in temperature in the former pathology department with attached dissecting room. In comparison to other parts of the hospital, it´s very cold in there. For some, the journey ended here once. Here, in the cold and pitch-dark cellar at least our journey ends for the day. We take some more photos and leave the coldness of the basement through the heat of the boiler room. At the end of the day, find ourselves in the pleasant spring sun and breathe fresh air. [/url]
  6. Build in the late 80's, "The Hopital Batman" is lost in the middle of the french campaign... Due to a huge deficit - 5 millions euros -, this reeducation center was closed in 2009. It was suppose to be renovated and to create a extension of 70 beds. All the employes and the patients was moved in another hospital in a bigger town.
  7. USA

    This ominous building once served as the power plant for the Central State Mental Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  8. The Hospital was founded in 1831 & by 1929 special feature available included Turkish, Russian & medicated baths & electro-medical department. The Infirmary was also approved for the treatment of Veneral Diseases The New Road Campus has been home to it"s various named College incarnations since the 1967 when the College paid £105,000 for the site. New buildings were opened in 1967 with the main block being opened in 1971. By 1978 they were 8,000 Students attending the college. The site which now consists of 10 linked buildings totaling 342,000 sq/ft over a 6.1 Acre site, which includes the original Grade 2 listed Hospital buildings, with it"s impressive original sandstone columns identical to those on the nearby Railway Station. With the statue of Edward the VII now looking over the car park. The College has recently moved into a new purpose build waterfront development for £60M which will welcome @20K Students. The old site has been purchased by Oldham based Wiggett Construction Company for an undisclosed sum Suggestions for the site include a Supermarket, a Care or Medical Centre, with the final potion un-allocated. The local Lidl has confirmed it will move to the new location from it"s local site. The area is not a place i frequent often. I find it too much like Bradford, all doom & gloom & full of Druggies who ironically, had curtailed my first trip prematurely when i"d previously recce"d this place in the Summer . I"d completely forgotten about the place, so thanks go too @albino-jay for bringing this location back into the limelight, with his quality recent night-time report And thanks for the pointers mate Called down one typically Yorkshire gloomy day for a recce & met up with @The Amateur Wanderer later on & decided to return on another much more gloomy freezing & wet day (nice too meet up again mate had some laughs & frights along the way The site itself is vast combining old & new construction techniques & buildings, so one minute you"re inside a modern day facility the next you"ve stepped back in time. The only thing they both share is the fact they"ve been well trashed. It looks like the Metal Fairies have been very busy over the last 3 years & is very reminiscent of DRI / Clayton Hospital with added Razor Wire on top. But has lots of hidden nooks & crannies to keep you occupied for a few hours at the least. I should mention that lots of rooms etc have been modified for Filming purposes from what we could ascertain, paint schemes similar to smoke & soot damage over the walls and curtains and strategic placed old beds & equipment .....which obviously been strategically re-positioned lol As always, thanks for looking ] Merry Xmas
  9. Gledhow Grove, built in the 1820's was designed by architect John Clark in Greek Revival style. Chapel Allerton Hospital was opened in may 1927 by HRH Princess Mary, It was run by the Ministry of Pensions and cost £130,000. It replaced the old military hospital at Becketts Park in Leeds, catering for patients who had been injured in the Great War, specializing in the fitting of appliances and false limbs to war veterans. The hospital closed in 1994, the old hospital buildings were demolished and the Grade II listed mansion has been left derelict with new housing built in the grounds. In early 2008, filing cabinets containing patients' details were found inside the basement of the hospital after it had already been sold on. As most of this place has already been converted I only got to explore the mansion part of it. What's unique about this building is how different the layout is to your average hospital, and it still had lots of character despite being so wrecked. Some of the floors that we saw above had completely fallen through with the entire carpet hanging down, probably one of the most far-gone places I've seen.
  10. The History Clayton Hospital was opened in 1854; after Thomas Clayton, a former city mayor donated buildings to the Wakefield general dispensary, an organisation set up to provide healthcare for the poor. It provided much needed healthcare long before the NHS was formed. The hospital was later abandoned in 2012. Specialist eye services have moved from Clayton to the more modern Pinderfields Hospital and its sexual health services will be based at King Street Walk-in Centre. The Explore Explored with @plod and a member from 28. (shot out to the 3 kids we also met there ) It's a shame to see that the place is in such a state, I tried to make the best of it despite not having much battery power left in my camera from the previous explores of the day. The main building was pretty disorientating so I'm sure I missed some of it but I'm quite satisfied with what I did get to see, given how trashed the place is anyway. We were interested in finding the morgue and we managed to locate it but it was very well boarded up, and there is anti-climb paint covering the fences that surround it as our friend managed to find As we were searching for a way in to another building in the center of the site, the security guard showed up while @plod was down the tunnels looking for a way in from there. Security gave us 2 minutes to get him out before the police are called but plod had wandered so far in that he couldn't hear us calling him Luckily he showed up in time after no luck finding anything; the security guard wasn't happy but he gave us no trouble as he didn't really seem to know what he was doing.
  11. Evening Scabies and jelly spoons, hope everyones settling back into work alright. This place is on my doorstep but was never really fussed with it, as we all know its been major 2015 tour bus destination so you know what you're in for. Was kinda always saving this place for a rainy day when i fancied some exploring but couldn't be arsed to drive to far, so yeah that day came and i popped up selly oak hospital with a couple of young bloods who are new to the forum, they had been firing reports up on 28 from all sorts of old brum derps and clearly putting the effort in and getting out exploring stuff so i teamed up with them for selly oak, originally i wanted to do the river rea but needless to say what with all the rain it was a bit of a raging torrent so that's been back burnered, that word looks like bummered from where i'm sat, it shouldnt say bummered. the explore- the explore was pretty straight forward, no craziness, no swat teams, no russian mountain dog chases, not even a sniff of secca. Thank you to the lovely lady (you know who you are) who hooked me up some details on what's what access wise at the minute, pretty straight forward mooch, still plenty of nice bits left to see, a lot more than i was expecting to be honest, couldn't believe there's more to this place than a morgue!! morgue pics seems to be the only thing i've seen from the place, don't get me wrong there is a whole load of bugger all here as well but there's a few interesting bits dotted about, my fave was the bed with the leather worn off in the shape of a person and then mould has started growing through the worn material, who doesn't want to see some fungus feeding of the moisture of years of embedded human perspiration and growing in the shape of a person! fookin gross right generic wiki history The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King’s Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601.[1] The rising costs of poor relief had become a national problem and the new act sought to address this. Throughout the country, parishes were formed into larger unions with the power to raise money from rates on property to pay for the poor. King’s Norton Poor Law Union was formed from the parishes of Harborne, Edgbaston, King’s Norton, Northfield and Beoley. Each of these five parishes had individual workhouses. These were replaced in 1872 by the new, much larger one at Selly Oak. It was built to accommodate 200 pauper inmates. Central supervision by the Poor Law Commissioners in London ensured that all workhouses were administered similarly by a set of rules and regulations. How humanely these were interpreted depended entirely upon each local board of Poor Law Guardians, who were local worthies. They were elected annually and gave their services voluntarily. The aim of the Poor Law Amendment Act was to deny any form of relief except through admission to the workhouse. Generally it was assumed that the able-bodied poor could find work and if they did not then they should be forced to work within the confines of the workhouse. It was thought that if conditions in the workhouse were really bad then the poor would be deterred from seeking relief. However, by the late 18th century it became apparent that the majority of workhouse inmates were the most vulnerable people in society; the young, the old, the chronic sick and the mentally ill. Various Acts of Parliament ruled that separate provision should be made for children and the mentally ill. The sick poor were to be accommodated in separate infirmary blocks. These were often built adjacent to the workhouses and were the forerunners of many great hospitals of today. Commemorative plaque recording the opening of the King's Norton Union's Infirmary at Selly Oak, on the "3rd Day of September 1897" At Selly Oak, a separate infirmary was built in 1897 at a cost of £52,000. It was the subject of much heated debate as the original estimate had been £18,000. It was a light, clean and practical building, and generally a source of much pride. The Guardians took great care and gathered information from other infirmaries to ensure that the final design, put out to a competition and won by Mr. Daniel Arkell, was up-to-date and modern. The Infirmary accommodated about 250 patients in eight Nightingale wards and smaller side wards and rooms. There was also provision for maternity cases. Between the two main pavilions were a central administration block, kitchens, a laundry, a water tower, doctors’ rooms and a telephone exchange. There was no operating theatre or mortuary and, in the workhouse tradition, the internal walls were not plastered, painted brick being considered good enough for the sick paupers. The workhouse and infirmary were separated by a high dividing wall and were run as separate establishments. The population of the King’s Norton Union increased dramatically, and in 1907 extensions to the infirmary and the workhouse made provision for the growing numbers of poor people. This doubled the size of the main hospital building. The Woodlands Nurses’ Home was built at the same time to accommodate forty nurses. A small operating room was added to the infirmary. There was a resident nursing staff of eight trained nurses and nineteen probationers who were supervised by the Matron. She also had responsibility for the resident female servants. The Steward managed the infirmary, governed the male servants, kept the accounts, ordered provisions, and recorded births and deaths. There was a Senior Medical Officer who attended three times a week between 11:00 and 13:00. A Resident Medical Officer attended at both the infirmary and the workhouse. In 1911, King’s Norton – no longer a rural area – left Worcestershire and became part of the City of Birmingham. The Birmingham Union was formed from the unions of King’s Norton, Aston and Birmingham. The King’s Norton Workhouse Infirmary was renamed Selly Oak Hospital. Over the next two decades facilities improved with the addition of an operating theatre, plastering of internal walls, and the introduction of physiotherapy, pathological and X-ray services. By 1929 there were seven full-time members of the medical staff, and the medical residence was built at this time. The Good Samaritan (1961), by Uli Nimptsch, in front of the Out-patients Unit at Selly Oak Hospital Attitudes to the poor changed gradually and measures to relieve poverty, such as old age pensions and National Insurance, were introduced before the First World War. By 1930, the administrative structure of the Poor Law was finally dismantled. Selly Oak Hospital and the Workhouse, renamed Selly Oak House, came under the administration of Birmingham City Council. Selly Oak House was administered separately and used for the care of the elderly chronic sick. Selly Oak Hospital continued to grow, new operating theatres were added in 1931, and the biochemistry and pathology laboratories opened in 1934. Nurses had been trained at Selly Oak since 1897, but it was not until 1942 that the School of Nursing was opened. In 1948, when the National Health Service was introduced, Selly Oak Hospital and Selly Oak House were amalgamated. Since then many changes to the site have resulted in the institution we see today. Recent developments[edit] The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening [2] On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best[citation needed] burns units in the country. It was also home to theRoyal Centre for Defence Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans.[4] The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war.[5] There were also difficulties[clarification needed] when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman.[6] A report published by the House of CommonsDefence Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign[7] and praised the clinical care provided to military patients.[8] Picturegraphs MOULD MAN!!! [ thanks for looking guys, always remember to stop look and listen, always wait for the green man and always be aware of stranger danger, take it sleazy kids.
  12. History “This is somewhere that has been on the market for ten years with little or no interest… It has suffered terribly from vandalism and theft over the years and is likely to sit like this for another ten years if permission isn’t granted…” (Ed Alder, Regional and Land Planning Manager). Homelands Hospital was built on the outskirts of the small village of Helmington Row in 1903, as a fever hospital to treat diseases such as tuberculosis, typhus and smallpox. Its isolated location was ideal, and specifically selected to prevent the spread of disease to larger towns and cities. The location was also deemed suitable owing to the fresh air rural surroundings yield; during the early 20th century one of the favoured methods for treating lung diseases was to use nature as a form of therapy, to move patients away from the smoke and smog of industrious cities. A number of trees were planted around the buildings after the initial construction of the hospital, to increase the supply of oxygen and create a more picturesque setting. Today, the vast majority of the trees have preservation orders, protecting them against any planned demolition of the site. In later years, the facility was modernised and redeveloped into a general health care unit. Although the original buildings adhere to a municipal design criterion, the interior features of the buildings were altered extensively; all of the surfaces were covered by more hygienic materials that were approved by health and safety guidelines. Unfortunately, the hospital was closed in 2004. Owing to its rural location and the construction of much larger general health care units in bigger cities, Homelands hospital was deemed superfluous. Since 2004 the facility has remained derelict. In spite of the site costing £20,000 a year to maintain, and although several applications have been submitted to demolish the existing buildings and build houses, Durham County Council have, to date, rejected all plans. The main reason for the stalemated negotiations are down to local residents who have, so far, objected to every development proposal. Many have raised concerns around the trees and potential drainage issues. For councillors, there were further concerns surrounding the lack of affordable housing that would be generated from each of the suggested projects. Our Version of Events A couple of hours before visiting Homelands Hospital we did a little research to see if it had ever been done before. As it turned out, a couple of other reports had been posted back in 2011. To our disappointment, the buildings looked a bit fucked back then, and it also looked as though there wasn’t much inside them. However, since we’d already planned to head over that way, we thought there was no harm checking the place out… Having said that, the reports we did find all suggested that this was a hard place to get in and out of successfully – without getting caught anyway. According to one source, the place ‘[was] PIR censored up to the eyeballs, and set to a silent alarm’. With such censoring in place, we took a moment to remind one another not to use any bad language while out on this explore – after all, the wireless PIRs must have been place to supress all such activity, and we’d taken note that there was a silent alarm to try and catch us out. On top of this, ‘6-8 officers with 3 riot vans and the dog section’ – Crook’s entire police force – seemed to be on call if the alarms were tripped. Other reports made reference to some sort of control room, where guards sit and watch you on CCTV, so we knew some proper stealthy moves were of the essence. After finding a subtle parking spot, right outside the front gate of the building (because it looked like it was about to rain), we hoped no one would notice us and ‘masked up’, preparing our disguises to avoid the hardened security measures that were in place. Just before we hopped the front gate, Box phoned his grandma to arrange bail in the event we got caught. Thankfully, she agreed, and even offered to bring cheese and pickle sandwiches and a flask of tea if we ended up behind bars. Feeling much better that we’d secured our bail, we jumped into the main courtyard and attempted to imitate some classic 90s Power Ranger moves as we ducked and dodged the CCTV cameras. Unfortunately, things didn’t quite work out as well as we would have liked, and very quickly we found ourselves staring directly up at one of the cameras. Knowing that the clock was now ticking, and that we had around ’30 minutes’ left before certain capture, we made a mad dash across the site, frantically searching for a way in. Fortunately, we didn’t have to race around the site aimlessly for too long until we found a suitable way inside. By this point, however, we realised we only had around 20 minutes left before ‘the boys in blue’ turned up. We set about setting our tripods up as quickly as possible, hoping to get a few shots in before they arrived. As the last leg of my tripod clicked into place we could already hear the distant barking of what sounded like dogs – and they sounded pretty fucking big! Inside the central corridor leading to the wards, and, in fact, every other part of the site, security lights suddenly flashed across us, which was very strange considering it was daytime. The three of us quickly ducked and crawled along the old red carpet that’s mostly green these days. It squelched and wheezed, and emitted an incredibly foul-smelling odour, but we didn’t care – the dogs were right outside now, trying to sniff us out. The mossy damp carpet stench would cover our scent perfectly. Loud barks and growls filled the rest of the air around us as we desperately struggled to pull ourselves along the floor without scratching our lenses. At the bottom of the corridor we soon discovered that the PIRs were the least of our worries. It seemed that the previous explorers had failed to notice the ex-Soviet AK48 Russian bear trap that was preventing us from accessing the lowered buildings and, ultimately, our only means of escape. It was only then that we noticed the second ex-Soviet Russian AK48 bear trap to our left. It looked as though it was originally positioned to prevent access to a kitchen area, but another unfortunate urban explorer seemed to have fallen victim to the barbaric mechanism. Held inside the trap firmly at the legs, a fully clothed skeleton was lying on the floor, clutching a dark chocolate KitKat in its left hand. Clearly this explorer had stopped to take a break, and in their excitement to taste the splendid mix of chocolate and wafer had failed to see the deadly trap. It was a tragic sight, and a struggle to fight back the deep sense of sorrow that was welling up inside each of us. However, knowing that we couldn’t hang around long we decided to move on. Fortunately, Mayhem, having absconded from the Soviet Union back in the 80s, had some experience in safely dismantling bear traps, so he set to work disassembling it like a pro. Meanwhile, myself and Box were hungry, so we decided to make use of the leftover KitKat. We shared the last two sticks with one another. There wasn’t enough for Mayhem, and he was busy anyway, so we ate it swiftly before he had time to notice. After that, since Mayhem still hadn’t quite finished with the trap, we had a quick look inside the skeleton’s camera bag. Inside we found a 64gb SD card, which Box wasted no time in swiping, a packet of ginger nuts and a damp wallet. Gripped by a burning sense of curiousity, we opened it and took a peek. Inside there was £4.69 in change, a flavoured condom and some form of ID. A familiar name was displayed prominently on the ID, it read: ACID-REFLUX. The pair of us gasped in shock. Before we could grieve, though, a loud bang erupted from somewhere behind us. ‘The boys in blue’ were there, at least twelve of them too, all dressed in full riot gear. Fortunately, however, and we might add rather conveniently, Mayhem had just managed to diffused the trap, so we all made a run for it. I grabbed the ginger nuts in the brief second before I bolted; there was a chance we might need them for the journey home if we made it back to the car. Not a single one of us dared to look back, we kept running until we reached the car. Box fumbled with the keys for several seconds, but eventually managed to ram the key inside the lock. Everyone jumped inside, and a moment later and the car roared to life. ‘The boys in blue’ were exiting the building now, but Box hit the accelerator and we sped off down the lane. Only a thick cloud of dust appeared in the car mirrors now. Although we regretted leaving ACID’s skeleton behind, cheers and shouts of joy erupted inside the car as we’d managed to evade capture and hadn’t ended up inside a bear trap ourselves. In other words, nothing particularly interesting happened the entire time we were exploring Homelands hospital. Other than finding many toilets and sinks, there’s wasn’t an awful lot else inside any of the buildings. While various parts of the hospital are quite photogenic throughout, it’s probably only worth a visit if you happen to be in Crook or Helmington Row, perhaps visiting relatives? Indeed, we did come across some old CCTV cameras and a few sensors, but, as far as we could tell, none of them appeared to be working. Having said that, we did come across an alarm panel which was still switched on, and the words ‘armed’, or ‘active’ (something along those lines), were contained in the display panel. So who knows, maybe our stealthy skills paid off in the end… Explored with Ford Mayhem and Box. *ACID-REFLUX was not harmed in the making of this report, we did not steal his ginger nuts, and to our knowledge he is still alive and well. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  13. Opened in 1867 as Moulsford Asylum, also known as Berkshire Lunatic Asylum, Berkshire Mental Hospital and then Fairmile Hospital until closure in 2003. I visited solo on a rainy Sunday morning back in September 2010, it was a real tricky place to get around, well guarded with active cctv dotted around the place. The tight security meant that it was in great condition inside with hardly any vandalism, although it was pretty much empty. Access involved getting real close to the security hut but wasn't too bad if you were quiet. I came pretty close to getting caught inside, at one point the guard was only about 6 feet away from me but somehow he didn't spot me and I managed to get out undetected! The conversion was well under way last year, I wouldn't be surprised if there are people living in there by now. I in no way got to see all of it, there was plenty that I missed and unfortunately never made it back to see the rest. Here are some picture of what I did see.
  14. I know, Haslar.... Again! This place has pretty much become a second home to @TheVampiricSquid and I over the last few months, mainly because the place is slowly but surely being torn apart now... The place never disappoints us, and we love giving people tours of the place! On one of our recent tours with a couple of non OS members, we'd realised the X-Ray machines were still there, and in immaculate condition, despite being sat there for 7 odd years! I'd never seen these before as they were in a place we never normally go, and I thought they'd been removed, along with the beds etc. We also managed to get back into the water tower while giving another non OS member a tour and snap some shots inside there, unfortunately I was only equipped with my body and fisheye, so the shots are high ISO. The last 3 shots were taken on my phone, so ignore the quality Cheers for looking
  15. Visited as part of the Scotland tour with @Butters & @R0tt3nW00d After spending a little longer than anticipated at Eastend, we decided to skip one of our planned locations and head here instead as geographically speaking it made more sense than heading yet further North at 4 pm. I'm glad we chose to do this as it would appear there is more here than most peopel realise. On arrival it was rather surprising to find that the whole area was saturated with dog walkers, so most unusually we walked straight past the security house and into the heart of the Asylum. 3 times the secca passed us in their pick up and didn't even look twice at us. There is more to be done here, but for now as i can't see me going back in the near future, this will do History; Shamelessly ripped from Wiki with a few minor alterations Bangour Village Hospital was a psychiatric hospital located west of Dechmont in West Lothian, Scotland. It was officially opened in October 1906 (under the name Edinburgh District Asylum), over two years after the first patients were admitted in June 1904. In 1918 Bangour General Hospital was created in the grounds, but the hospital began winding down in 1989 with services being transferred to the newly built St. John's Hospital in the Howden area of Livingston. The final ward at Bangour eventually closed in 2004. The hospital was modelled on the example of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s, at Schkeuditz, Germany, and represents one of the first village-plan psychiatric hospitals in Scotland. The Bangour institution comprised individual villas which would house approximately 30 patients each. The village also incorporated its own railway connection, a farm, bakery, workshops, recreation hall, school, shop, library and, latterly, a multi-denominational church. The hospital was requisitioned by the War Office during both wars when it became the "Edinburgh War Hospital" and "The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital", reverting to a psychiatric hospital between the wars and after 1945. The number of patients rose to over 3,000 in 1918. Temporary marquees and prefabricated huts were erected to cope with the demand for bed space, for both patients and staff. This led to the creation of Bangour General Hospital in the surrounding grounds, which was to become a world leader in many medical fields, in particular its esteemed burns and plastic surgery unit which was established in 1940. It also had a 1st class Maternity Unit serving the whole of the county. In 1989, St John's Hospital opened in nearby Livingston, and services were transferred from Bangour General Hospital, which closed in the early 1990s. The Village Hospital also started to wind down after the opening of St Johns, with the last remaining ward closing in 2004. The hospital site comprises numerous buildings and structures, including 13 category A listed buildings. An architectural competition held in 1898 was won by Hippolyte Blanc. The villas are domestic in character, while the nurse's home is more institutional. The villas were set within landscaped grounds, and are built in a 17th-century Scottish Renaissance style, with numerous individual variations. At the centre of the site is an Edwardian Baroque hall, and a Romanesque style church, which was designed by H. O. Tarbolton and built 1924-1930.[ When the hospital was built, road access was poor, and considerable volumes of coal and general stores were required for the running of the facility. A private railway line was built, branching from the former Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway line at Uphall. It was authorised by the Edinburgh and District Lunacy Board Act of 30 July 1900, and it was opened to passengers on 19 June 1905. It may have been used before that date in connection with construction of the hospital. The North British Railway operated the line, but the Bangour station was considered private. However there was an intermediate station at Dechmont, which was open to the public generally, and was much used by staff at the hospital who lived at Dechmont. During World War I the road network was improved, and the railway became unnecessary; it was closed on 1 August 1921, although passenger services probably ceased on 4 May 1921. The closed hospital was used as a filming location for the 2005 film The Jacket, starring Keira Knightley and Adrian Brody. During September 2009, the hospital grounds were used as the site for "Exercise Green Gate", a counter-terrorist exercise run by the Scottish Government to test de-contamination procedures in the event of a nuclear, chemical or biological incident. This involved 250 volunteer "casualties" and 400 emergency staff. The site is now also popular with Urban Explorers people who enjoy exploring old and abandoned buildings, taking pictures to document their existence before they disappear due to either severe decay or demolition. The local health board however are not keen and as of 2005 have security patrolling the grounds to stop people entering the now dangerous and unstable buildings. (Shit load of good they were LMFAO) On the 1st of October 2015 Planning Permission for a residential and mixed use redevelopment of the former hospital site is being sought. The application notes some of the listed buildings at the site may be proposed for full demolition in a subsequent application. This may include villas 7,8,9 and 21, with other buildings potentially proposed for partial demolition. Unfortunately we never made it into that spectacular rec hall or the chapel, however what we did find that i hadnt seen before was this; Thanks for looking
  16. Wakefield Maternity Hospital (1935 - 1992) Manygates Hospital (1948 - c.1981) This is the only block left along with the Manygates house. As the contract stated these have to be renovated and the firm wants to now knock them down they have been left.We can only guess what will happen to them soon as it too often the case. Manygates Hospital was formerly Wakefield Corporation Maternity Hospital, situated in Blenheim Road, Wakefield. It transferred to Manygates Park, Barnsley Road in 1935. The hospital closed in 1992 and transferred to Pinderfields Hospital for a short period. Maternity services in Wakefield ended in 2000. Records survive from 1919 - 1977, these include staff registers (1928-1855) patient registers 1919 - 1971 and administration/finance records (1919-1950). Later records for Manygates Hospital (c.1960s - 2000) were destroyed by the hospital trust.
  17. thanks to KM Punk for this one. The village consists of a number of cottages, houses, daycare centres, greenhouses, an admin block & a hall. Not all of the buildings were accessible. Not only was the power on, but I was surprised to find some of the lights were left on in some of the buildings too. Nothing was in a terrible condition, and it feels a shame that it closed. The greenhouses contained some amusingly rotten grapes, presumably from a wine growing project. Apologies if this is a bit bland, But, at least it is fresh; and completely un-vandalised. CARE Shangton was a ‘Care Village’ for people with Learning Disabilities and Moderate Mental Health Conditions. It was established in 1966, but officially opened in 1973. The concept of the community based care provided, was a big step towards today’s supported living. It focused on promoting the independence of the service users by providing occupations that suited the individual, this was mainly in Catering and Horticulture. The company, CARE, also owned a tea room and a had a stall at the market in neighbouring Market Harborough. The service users planted and potted plants and made bouquets of flowers, which were sold on the market stall and all proceeds went to the resident’s fund for day trips and holidays. They also baked cakes, scones, etc and sold them at both the tea room and the market stall. The village was very successful, holding a very good reputation locally. It provided a service to 53 people, at times there was a waiting list to have a home here. One feature of the village that was visibly different from other care facilities, was that it was made up of several houses specially designed for 2-4 people and a more traditional 14 beded unit filled with corridors. With the success of the village and the aging of the houses, it was announced in 2007 that CARE Shangton was to close. However, after an outcry the village was temporarily saved. In 2013, it was announced that CARE had merged with Self Unlimited. Soon after they revealed plans to relocate to the local town, Market Harborough, to ‘help the service users integrate into the local community’. The process of moving people started in late 2013 and was completed in October 2015. The new facility can provide for up to 80 people and can provide for a wider range of abilities. The site has been sold and there has been a planning permission application for new housing. And the greenhouse, with its Skanky Skany rotting grapes! thanks for looking!
  18. History Glamis Private Hospital opened in 1988, to cater for the rising elderly population in Dunedin. It closed during the autumn of 2011, after $18 million was invested in the Yvette Williams Retirement Village (named after the former Olympic gold medallist) located in nearby Highgate. Investment in a new premises was said to be due to the increasing demand for bed space. All of the former staff and residents at Glamis were moved across to the new site, which was described as a ‘boutique retirement village with improved facilities’. All residents would, for instance, have access to an en-suite bathroom at the facility. While Ryman, the current owners of Glamis, intended to sell the site once it was vacant, it still remains empty in 2016. Our Version of Events Back in the barely habited scrubland of the South Island of New Zealand – better known as Dunedin – I decided to follow up a tip off that an abandoned hospital had popped up. Deciding to walk was a bad idea, since it turned out to be miles out of my way, but I still arrived with some daylight to spare. After standing around looking suspicious for a while, waiting for a suitable gap in the pedestrian traffic, I managed to get inside fairly easily. It’s a funny thing that, normally Dunedin is like a ghost town, but when I decide to explore hundreds of people suddenly appear! Inside there seemed to be plenty of leftover stuff, so I set about grabbing as many snaps as possible before it got too dark. To my disappointment, there were no beds in any of the former bedrooms, although there were other medical-related objects – namely chairs, walking sticks and pills – spread around the building. Overall, the place felt as though it had been abandoned only a few months ago, not four years or so. There were still plenty of food supplies leftover for instance; baked beans and what not – so that was my dinner sorted anyway. I had to pass on the bread unfortunately… 1: Glamis Private Hospital 2: Front Entrance 3: Main Reception Desk 4: Main Entrance 5: Behind the Main Desk 6: The Main Hall 7: Kitchen (Room One) 8: Kitchen (Room Two) 9: Stereotypical Elderly Person Tea-set 10: Shared Ward Area 11: Private Room 12: Toilet Seat 13: Main Corridor 14: One of the Communal Rooms 15: More Rooms 16: Former Office 17: Staircase Shot 18: Leftover Personal Belongings 19: Staff Room 20: Staff Kitchen 21: Physiotherapy Department 22: Another Staff Office 23: Hair Dressing Room 24: Bathroom 25: More Belongings 26: Second Communal Area 27: Wheelie Toilet Chair 28: Communal Area 29: Walking Sticks 30: The Piano Shot
  19. History The now derelict Bangour Village Hospital is a large Psychiatric Hospital complex which first opened in 1906 as The Edinburgh District Asylum with an initial 200 patients. The Asylum which was modelled on a German village-plan design similar to that of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s. In 1918 when the Asylum has around 3000 patients it was renamed as Bangour Village Hospital and operated under this name until its closure in 2004. As with many other hospitals Bangour was requisitioned during both World War I and World War II and held the temporary names of “The Edinburgh War Hospital” and “The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital”. Both in the interim years between the wars and after 1945 the Hospital continued to function as a psychiatric facility. A gradual phased closure of the Hospital began in 1989 with the closure of Bangour General Hospital (now Demolished) and the opening of the nearby St John’s Hospital. The last remaining wards closed in 2004. Since its closure, the Bangour Village Hospital was used as a location for the filming of The Jacket starring Adrian Brody & Keira Knightly. In 2009 The grounds were also used as a location for a counter-terrorist exercise named “Exercise Green Gate” which was a large scale training set up with 400 emergency services staff and 250 volunteer casualty actors. The activity was intended to prepare staff for chemical, biological or nuclear attack. Our visit Visited with Baron Scotland and Lowri, I’d always wanted to take a look around this place and was pleasantly surprised at by how vast the site was… the villas just seem to go on forever as you walk around the grounds which are frequented by local dog walkers. We managed to get access to 2 buildings the main recreation hall which was one of the original buildings and the church which was added in 1929 and was in surprisingly good condition with only some relatively minor water damage to one gable wall. Most of the other buildings seemed to be very heavily boarded and in worsening conditions. I don’t imagine there would be a great deal else to see but I wouldn’t mind a look around the nurses block at some point. It’s certainly one of the more attractive buildings externally. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Enjoy
  20. Ok thought i would check this out. Its not been done in a little while so not sure what i was going to find. Explore. Well fun to be had here. Once i was close noticed it was all scaffy up and a lot of workers flying about. Its as you would call it in full flow. So my first intinct was to say fook it has from looking at it its a shell. But after a little nosey a found a nice little way in without drawing any attension from workers or neighbours. Inside was exactly has i thought a bloody shell nothing was left and renovation was in full flow. Bit gutted but having loads of fun watching workers plum about outside. Every single room was gutted no real signs of hospital anywhere. But my sole purpose was the clock tower. After a nosey arround at some rather nice old stairs i found another set of old stairs and knew it was up to tower. And boy it did not disapoint. Really nice views and nice clock well worth it. Shame weather was not the best Then on the way back down found quite a sweet underground section got to see quite a bit of it but was badly flooded to be honest the whole place had water coming down from all sides. Anyways visit was with my missus and was overall a good bit ov fun. Oh the one place i dident get to see was the chapel work on it was well under way and eyes all over lol. To be honest i feel it will be no different. Anyway funtimes avoiding workers etc was had and overall was quite a nice mooch if a little sad nothing really was left. Enjoy this nice little update for birch hill. Thanks all History taken from manchester news. And others A landmark Victorian hospital will finally close its doors to patients next month, it has been announced. Birch Hill Hospital in Rochdale, which was once a workhouse, will shut on January 2, when its remaining services transfer to Rochdale Infirmary. Services began switching from the run-down Birch Hill in 2001, but the relocation of the ophthalmology department will be the final piece of the jigsaw. Bosses at Pennine Acute Trust are spending £1.8m to improve the ophthalmology service, and will house it in a specialist unit at the Infirmary. The development – known as the Eye Unit – includes two theatres, refurbished outpatient facilities and support accommodation. The old Birch Hill site was built as a workhouse and opened in 1877. It had wards for ‘imbeciles’ and ‘fever’ patients, in addition to an infirmary block. A modern hospital block opened in 1902 – at a cost of £30,000 – and part of the site was used by the military in the First World War. It was also used as an emergency medical service facility in the Second World War before becoming an NHS hospital. Developer Persimmon Homes bought 28 acres of the former hospital site, on Union Road, for £21.5m in 2007 for housing – and the site has room for up to 400 homes. The historic clock tower will be preserved and form a centrepiece of the new development. The new ophthalmology service at Rochdale Infirmary will provide planned and emergency eye care for the population of Heywood, Middleton, Rochdale, Bury, parts of east Lancashire, Tameside and Glossop. Tanveer Hashmi, clinical director for ophthalmology at Pennine Acute Trust, said: “We are all keen to improve the experience that our patients receive and this new state-of-the-art environment at Rochdale Infirmary will provide this. “A lot of thought has gone into how patients will move around the unit, which will enhance patient flow and productivity, but, most importantly, provide safe, high-quality care to all patients who are to undergo an ophthalmology procedure. “There has been a considerable amount of commitment from all the staff involved in the development of the new Eye Unit at Rochdale Infirmary and the design will combine outpatients and treatment facilities which represent a significant improvement to both staff and patients.” n 1871, the Union purchased a 24-acre site on the slopes of Birch Hill and Starring Hill at Dearnley for £2,500. The following year, building work began on a large new workhouse. In March 1873, the old Spotland workhouse partially collapsed, possibly because of subsidence due to an old coal-pit beneath the building. However, since the new workhouse was far from ready, the Spotland building had to be patched up and was used for another four yours. Even then its days were not over — in 1881, Rochdale Corporation were forced to rent it for use as a temporary isolation hospital during a smallpox epidemic. The new workhouse, designed by George Woodhouse and Edward Potts, was originally intended to accommodate 632 inmates but by its eventual opening in November 1877, various extensions had increased the capacity to 847, including 29 officers. The total cost of the buildings and land was £85,000. The building was officially opened by the Mayor of Rochdale, Alderman T Schofield, on Wednesday 19th December 1877. Around seventy guests attended the ceremony which was followed by a tour of the premises and dinner at 3pm. Afterwards there were long speeches and a performance by the Orpheus Glee Club. At the centre of the main building were the Master's quarters, with the dining-hall (also originally used as a chapel) and kitchen and bakehouse forming the central block behind. Male inmates were accommodated to the west of the main block, and females to the east. At the rear of the main building were a laundry at the east and workshops and boiler-house to the west. The whole premises were heated by hot water pipes supplemented by an open fire in each room. In 1902, a 172-bed infirmary was built at the north of the workhouse. It had a central administration block with male and female ward pavilions to each side. During the First World War, part of the site was taken over by the military who also erected tents in the grounds. In 1930, control of the site passed to Rochdale County Borough, with the Poor Law Institution being run by the Public Assistance Committee and the Hospital being run by the Health Committee. With the inauguration of the National Health Service in 1948, the site became a single hospital known as Birch Hill. Now run by Rochdale Healthcare NHS Trust, many of the original buildings were in use until the hospital finally closed in 2013. Pics.. The clock tower.. Extra shots from tunnels etc.. And last the reason for all the work and activity Hope you all enjoyed and thanks for looking ...
  21. The first stop on our Italian Urbex tour the abandoned Mono Orphanage aka Crying Baby Hospital. As with quite a few of the locations on our trip this spot had been quite popular mainly because of the huge rooms filled with rows of beds. Sadly by the time we got there the beds had been taken apart and stacked in a room awaiting removal and the building appeared to have been cleaned out a bit internally and the grounds had freshly cut trees in them. This might suggest someone has bought the building and intends to renovate the place, but I cannot confirm this. Despite the beds being gone there were still plenty of things to shoot here including a couple of classrooms complete with children’s stools and desks and a medical room with a dentist type chair and several bottles of unknown liquids. Light was favourable and I’m pretty happy with my shots from here, bit of a shame about the beds and the graffiti but a nice location non the less. Visited with Matt, Andy K and Spider Monkey. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Higher res copies of the above photos and a few more shots on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2015/12/12/urbex-mono-orphanage-aka-crying-baby-hospital-italy-april-2015/
  22. Manicomio di R is a huge hospital facility located within a large town in Italy. Originally opened in 1871 the site consists of multiple buildings within large walled and fenced grounds and catered mainly for insane patients. Manicomio translates to “Madhouse” in English and was a term commonly used for the British counterparts, the county pauper and insane asylums, the majority of which are now close due to changed in attitudes towards mental health care. Whilst I have been unable to find much information about the place I suspect it suffered a similar fate and was apparently closed in the 1980’s. Visited with Matt, Spider Monkey and And de Kay. Another location which has been sat on the to-do list for far too long finally ticked off. I was pleasantly surprised by the lack of vandalism and graffiti in here. The majority of the buildings in the ground appeared pretty well sealed but we didn’t have time to check the rest as our efforts were focused on the largest building on the site. This main hospital building is full of medical equipment and boasts some impressive scenes to shoot and we scrambled around as quickly as we could trying to capture as much as possible before the final light of the day subsided. Only having a couple of hours in the huge site was certainly not enough and I’m sure there will be lots that I have missed but after finding the infamous operating theatre and the rather unusual body tipper I was more than satisfied with the shots I managed to capture. The days are rumoured to be numbered for this place, contractors have been known to be kicking around the buildings over the last few month and I suspect it is only a matter of time before this building becomes repurposed. Until then, it sits empty, decaying naturally for us explorers to enjoy… 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Higher res copies of the above photos and a few more shots on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2016/02/06/urbex-manicomio-di-r-italy-april-2015/
  23. Another lovely abandoned location in Italy, the Red Cross Hospital sits empty, on a hillside in a pretty remote locations. The weather was incredibly hot as we made our way inside and wondered about searching for the chapel which wasn’t as obvious to locate as we had expected. After shooting the famous Red Cross we had a look around the rest of the building which is largely empty except for a handful of wards which contained rows of beds complete with mattresses and a small classroom on the lower floors. Decay was heavy in most parts with trees growing inside some rooms and vegetation ingress in other parts which made for some really interesting shots. Really happy with this place, certainly exceeded my expectations and I was glad to finally have the chance to see if for myself 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Higher res copies of the above photos and a few more shots on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2015/12/26/urbex-red-cross-hospital-italy-april-2015/
  24. Italy

    I found this hospital somewhere in bella Italia. Unlinke many others, this was not a psychatric clinic, just an ordinary hospital... #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 In case you're not yet sick of it, you can see some more on my website: http://www.industriesafari.de/Viewer/Ospedale_SC/index.html
  25. Opening in the 1950s the CHU de Charleroi was a prominent building in the city centre. The purpose built facility had an accident and emergency unit and a large number of operating theatres. Patients were transferred to a brand new hospital a few miles away in Lodelinsart when the hospital closed in October 2014. @SpiderMonkey, Kriegaffe9 and I got over there just in time as the hospital has since been demolished. A proportion of the site had already gone when we visited, including morgue and many of the operating theatres. Luckily for us a couple still remained, complete with operating tables and lights. 1. Operating Theatre 2. Operating Theatre 3. Operating Theatre 4. Clinical Corridor 5. Staircase 6. Reception desk 7. Corridor 8. Glass blocks in corridor 9. Treatment room 10. Seated scales facing window 11. Pharmacy 12. Curved corridor 13. Another operating theatre 14. Operating theatre with farewell messages from ex-staff on the wall

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