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Found 203 results

  1. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  2. When i was a kid this was known as Crazy Marys house...The rumor was she froze to death but had pleanty of money to put the heat on....it wasent true..she was a mean old lady for sure who scared the crap out of me screeching at me when i walked by..Her Husband was a doctor and who killed himself in the house..he was an old fashiong doctor...back in his day you never went to a hospitol you went to the doctors house...he amputated arms, legs, preformed surgury in the basement.. He died in the late 1960s his wife in the 1980s...the house has never see anyone stay there for long..they alway seem to move out After crazy mary died workers came to clean out the house..my friend knew one and he went in..i was still too scared..he came out with an skeltons skull and jaw...old time doctors used to have them...he lured me in and i saw a room filled with sinks and it was all to creepy for me its been empty for years..and looters took the starecase and all the copper.. check out the floors a homless person had moved in an kept himself warm almost burning the house down For such a big house the doctor never had any children th The house is for sale but it needs alot ofrepairs andthe neighborhood has declined so no one can afford it heres my video walkthough i hear a few ghostly voices
  3. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  4. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  5. Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  6. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  7. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  8. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  9. this house always interested me..the yard was filled with junk..old cars..and other junk..it gave the appearence of being abandoned but someone clearly lived there the area became prime real estate..mcmansions went up and taxes went up..i knew this houses wouldent last....i went by and saw it was finally empty the 1st floor was a neat gloomy house rooms that feel like a horror movie all the lights hung poorly..surpised there wasent a fir from them.. see more of that in a bit upstairs' the upstairs was nthing but an attic...no bedrooms or bathroom..this was a single floor home.. basement a wood burning heater...thats an old way to heat a house the last thing still hanging that shows the personality of the owner odd old stained glass not sure what that is... ..the dead and prarie home companion There are a few male voices caught inside one seems like another lanuage
  10. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  11. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  12. The chateau is one of the many large abandoned houses that can be found around France. Built in the 1700s by the lord of the village it is within, the house has been modified and expanded over the years. The vaulted basement contains a full size snooker table below the original arched ceiling. A large stone fireplace is the centre-point of a sitting area to one end of the basement. The front entrance opens directly to a small stone staircase, leading up to the main living areas which are slightly raised from ground level, or down to the basement. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  13. So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  14. An abandoned house along a Belgian road. The house was partly destroyed by a fire and the former owner now resides with family. Some family member comes by occasionaly to feed the stray cats. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
  15. Recently, I´ve visited "Mold House". Of course, more than well-known. When I first set my eyes on pictures of that house with its amazing colours and its state of decay, I instantly fell in love. I´m glad I could fulfill my dream of visiting that place. I especially loved the pink colour of the armchairs being sokaed into the carpet.
  16. Hi everybody! This is a little adventure in a house full of old toys. Hope you enjoy...
  17. I don't post very much here on Oblivion State, So I thought I'd best start posting a bit more. Be warned this is going to be a picture heavy one. History I'm being purposefully vague as this place needs protecting from the cretins that unfortunately will take joy in ruining such a delightful property. 'Punch Lodge' as I'm calling it, was used by a large business as a management training facility. It had accommodation for the people attending the training courses, presumably running for several days or weeks at a time. The Lodge has roughly 20 rooms for accommodation, as well as lounge, bar and dining room areas. It also has a lovely round shed, swimming pool and a tennis court. It was used from at least 1980 and closed down in around 2007. I'm still trying to find more information about it, and I'll add any new information I find as an edit here. The Explore So like many of my finds, this was a Google Maps spot that I decided to go check out on the off chance. Normally with these things its a gamble as it's either been converted, knocked down, sealed up or was never derelict at all. I had a good feeling about this one though. As I approached it I could see a building over the fence, and what looked like a couple broken window panes. Carefully wandering down the overgrown path, I was presented with a big messy courtyard and the front of the lodge. There was a couple fire extinguishers chucked on the ground, the usual sign that kids had been in messing around. Access was simply an open door, so an excellent start already. Exploring from room to room, I was flabbergasted what I was seeing, the house was pristine! It almost was too good, I was expecting for an alarm to go off at any moment and the fuzz to show up. The house has 2 floors plus a 2nd floor loft conversion (with roof access too!). To my surprise the power was still on. Many of the lights still worked. A good amount of the rooms were filled full of crap, almost as if they were using it as storage. I found a few offices with lots of paperwork left. It was mostly tax returns and business related documents. Obviously the house was used to run a business from, but there was quite a few different business names to the address. However now that I know it was used for business and management training it makes a little more sense. I headed outside to explore the surrounding land. After fighting through brambles and trees I found a very full up swimming pool and the tennis court. I did a bit of research once I got home and found that there were numerous businesses that still had this address as its registered office. I don't have a very good knowledge of the inner works of running a business, but to have a registered office as the address of derelict property seems a bit naughty to me. Photos Externals This is the main courtyard area. You can see piles of rubbish and fire extinguishers that have been chucked about. Internals The main lobby area was pristine. This is the main door and porch area. The lounge area. The bar area used as storage for furniture. The dinning room The kitchen with everything left untouched once again. The downstairs office with lots of paperwork still left. Lots of silverware stuffed into a case?! This looks like it was used as a training room Upstairs. The long corridor with lots of bedrooms. A few of the rooms looked like they were being renovated. A few were being used for storage. Most had the same bright orange curtains. Bit of Sangria anyone? Another office type area, except I spotted something interesting in here. A CCTV monitor that was in standby mode. I hit the power button and all 4 cameras had VIDEO LOSS, so either they weren't set up properly or someone has disconnected them. The top floor consisted of a big bedroom with en-suite bathroom. Adding to the fun, there was roof access from one of the windows! Outside area By the corner of the house was a round shed that had a fantastic ceiling. The woodlands behind the house is very overgrown and it was a struggle to fight through the foliage to find anything. Found the swimming pool! Almost stepping right in as rain water had filled it to ground level. The tennis court. Thanks for reading.
  18. Hello, not sure on the full history of the place. I have found a little bit of information from Google. Great little house with a shop at the front. Loads of things left inside. The Butcher’s Home – Belgium An abandoned butchers house in Belgium. There lived a family of 10 people! a father and a mother and 4 boys and 4 girls. The home was abandoned in 1994 and left ever since! Thanks for looking!
  19. I've driven past this place many times but only recently realised it was empty as I passed it on a day out to explore, I know nothing of its history but deduce it's been empty around 5 years according to magazines found inside. It's situated in Mid Wales on a main road and the gardens are quite overgrown, thankfully this time of year the greenery is manageable! All doors were closed but thankfully one of them wasn't locked. There is also an outbuilding next door which I didn't have time to check out properly to see if there was access, next time maybe. Thanks for looking.
  20. I visited here with Brewtal from over at DP. Thanks for showing us around this place, it was great! Hope you like the drone video. This former manor house was used for Chemical and Optical work. The History for this place is pretty sketchy and I can't anything on it. Its being redeveloped into housing and part of the structure has been emptied and will be demolished. The main house is remaining to be redeveloped from what I understand. The roof is completely missing and has been covered completely by a scaffold roof. The top floor is very surreal because of this. The drone video! https://youtu.be/kZJJd8V4OD0 Thanks for reading!
  21. I've read conflicting reports on the history on this particular house. It is said that the property once belonged to Bob "The Bear" Hite, the lead singer of Canned Heat, a band that became popular in the '60s. His band mates and other musicians visited frequently for jam sessions and parties.
  22. Tottenham House is the centrepiece of the historic Tottenham estate in Wiltshire, England. The grade I listed house has 103 rooms and mostly dates from the 1820s when it was remodelled by Charles Brudenell-Bruce of Ailesbury. Set in forestry land that originally stretched for over 100 square miles, the extensive estate was partly used as a deer park and the deer still roam the lands to this day. The estate was the home of Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII, who died giving birth to the future king Edward VI. Henry VIII, a keen deer-hunter, regularly stayed there as a guest of Sir John Seymour, Jane’s father. The Ailesbury family lived in Tottenham House and shared it with the US Army during the Second World War. They moved out in 1946, at which point Hawtreys Preparatory School used the house until 1994. In 1966 the house was designated as Grade I listed, and the 50-horse stable block and octagonal folly in the deer park were designated Grade II listed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. All the walls in this room were lined with marble... The circular music room with ornate dome ceiling is stunning And finally a few externals
  23. Built in the 18th century, Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England. The house has amazing views over the Thames and central London can be seen in the distance. The house is named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786. A 125-foot-long gallery was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. It housed a considerable collection of paintings including works by Titian and El Greco. Both the house and gallery are Grade II listed, and planning permission for rennovation with some alterations has been granted. The house was put on the market in 2012 with a guide price of £15 million. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The Main House The Gallery
  24. A very interesting house but unfortunately in very bad shape. 1 2 3 4 5
  25. A small house with some furniture. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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