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Found 16 results

  1. I've code named this place as Meadows Cottage. This place is a hidden time capsule, with diaries and newspapers from as early as the 1940's. The most recent items had dates around the 1980's so it's hard to say how long this place has even been abandoned for. I actually explored this place back in May but have not yet shared it to the forum so here it is. So this place i understand was owned by a old lady named Mrs Banning, unfortunately when she past away this was past to her nephew that lived in Isle of Man. He had no care or need for the building or his aunties items inside.. it's since become left to decay and nature reclaimed the building and its surrounding area. With the recent sale of the building the new owners plan to demolish and rebuild on the land.. but this is said to currently be on hold due to bats, now taking residency in the cottage. It was obvious the surrounding garden that was once overgrown around the cottage was recently cut back, making for a easy access. I was very surprised to find what we did inside just left and forgotten. Here's some pictures form the explore followed by the Video of the explore. Here's the Video i made from the explore:
  2. The Explore ... Got there after i nice walk from the village and was quite surprised by how big and cool looking it was. And at first it looked it quite good condition. But that soon changed. In i went cam ready first rooms where ok and in fairly good condition. The bar was great and the dome disco room was ok but badly trashed. Sadly the dome and been fairly smashed up. Then the scare. I went into another room with carpet and squish it went. Holy crap looked up and the ceiling to the bedrooms had a huge crack and water was coming through. I jumped back and thought damn explore going to end earlier cause its damn dangerous. However i said go for it but very very slowly. Found a nice staircase slightly away from the crack. Into one bedroom and another. The rooms where awesome and in really good condition well most anyways. Then the truth about the damage came. The metal fairies had indeed been and made so much damage that the floor was very very weak. To make matters worse the roof was starting to give way has water came in destroying all in its path. Even the fairies pulled out . I was to go no further but really wanted the money shot from roof of the dome. What to do. I looked out of the window and tested a few places it was squidgy and was not risking that until i saw a nice beam. I went for it and i will let the pics tell you the rest ENJOY. I know its one of my older things but not sure if on here or not. Anyway its bad there now and deffo dont look like this. Hell it was bad when i went lol. History The privately owned Moorcock Inn Hotel and Restaurant, has closed and reopened a number of times under different management over the past 40 years. It finally shut its doors for the last time near the end of 2010. In 1975 it was put into liquidation after losses of £97,500 were revealed. Later that year, the building was gutted by fire, but was then fully restored and re-opened in 1977. Plans were submitted to turn the site into a development of luxury flats, but after a number of years of wrangling, the plans were thrown out and the hotel became known for fruit machines and discos. In 1984 it re-opened as a quality venue offering fine cuisine and functions. In 1995, permission was granted for 14 new bedrooms and a conference centre. The future of the once popular country hotel hangs in the balance after plans to knock it down and build three houses were re-submitted. Council’s planning committee turned down proposals to demolish it in November last year, saying the size of the houses did not meet local need and were out of keeping with the rural area. Pics. Said risky roof lol The self playing piano. Sadly now trashed On we go What was left of dome. Now wrecked even more. Hope you enjoy this. Remember this was early in my explore days and only with phone lol. Also changed up pics to add a little more exclusivity rather than a replica of other report. Think it means more like that. Anyhow thanks all for reading and looking.
  3. This was my first proper explore back when i didn't have a decent camera. Went back a few times recently with a better camera once solo & twice with Ferox (nice one mate always feels better to have some company wandering about this place), first time we went it was too dark & he didn't get the shots he needed so arranged another stupid o'clock in the morning trip. We didn't hear many unsettling noises which the place is notorious for, been in there solo a few times before at night and in the day and heard many unsettling noises. Something to bear in mind it is kind of in the city centre so a lot of the noises could probably be coming from outside. Found out from a 'friend of a friend' who used to work there as a nurse that the top floor was for private elderly patients & a lot of them talked about the 'friendly nun' who came in & looked after them/watched over them at night, no nuns worked here at that time. She also said there is meant to be a 'secret chapel' other than the chapel in the middle, don't know if there is or not but i doubt it... History "It is a Grade II listed former orphanage and maternity hospital developed as a sequence of buildings from 1872 through to the 1950’s. The original building is a two storey, red brick building in a high gothic style with a tower over the original entrance. The later 1930’s and 1950’s buildings are in a simple modernist style in brick. The buildings are arranged around a courtyard but one that is hidden from view despite its central location." first visit visit with Ferox and when we went back to get better light
  4. Been posting on a few other forums for a few months now, got into urbex after a mate told me about Whittingham & spending ages researching it obviously came across loads of urbex stuff. Didn't get to see her when she was whole but did get to see Whittingham, well half of it anyway. Most interested in hospitals/asylums right now & would really like to explore a school but haven't found any local ones just yet...
  5. Hey again! Visited this one with Goldie, feel really lucky to have done it at this time because many people soon after found it sealed and completely inaccessible. Beauty of a place but at the same time a death trap.. Dry rot central! Only certain areas i could get to to take photos for fear of falling through the floor, doesn't seem long until it fully collapses! History 'n' bits: The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. In 2011, the building still stands unused. The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. The former Empire Theatre in St James’s Street needs urgent repair work carrying out on the crumbling Victorian structure. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building which has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†Sadly not many shots here.. will probably add some when i have time! Thanks for looking.
  6. UK Holdings Lancashire Jan2014

    first report so be gentle and i know my camera skills aint the best but i enjoy getting out there This family affair was started in 1842 by James Holding at a small hamlet called Gaulkthorn, moving to Broadfield Pottery in 1860 where it continued under James Holding’s sons and grandsons until the early twentieth century. In 1900, James Holding, grandson of the founder, became manager at the current site. By 1912, the remaining brothers had joined James at Broughton Barn where they worked together for the next 37 years.
  7. Right, well this place always took my fancy, so me and Cloaked Up paid a visit one Summer evening to fail horribly. He went back a few months later and got in, so armed with a new access point, I rocked up with Sonyes. I checked the new entry and decided it was a bit sketchy, so we went back to the original, to discover additional barbed wire had been added to the mix. Fearful of another fail we walked a bit further and found a much easier walk in. Jackpot. Shame its massively paggered now even more so in last 6 months. Guess I was 6 years too late to catch it in its prime, but its been ticked off the list. St Joseph's was opened in 1872 as a refuge for catholic girls. The orphanage is tucked away in the back streets of the busy town centre and was run by the Sisters of Charity for our Lady Mother of Mercy. The site closed as an orphanage in 1954 and was more recently use as a convalescent home with an onsite hospital including two operating theatres. Despite having received a Grade II listing, property developers are seeking to 'redevelop' the entire complex by demolishing most of the standing buildings which would to be replaced with high rise apartments. I did quite like the way this place has grown organically, bits being added everywhere. Like a maze inside. First hit when dawn broke was the hospital block Then a stroll round the convalescent bit A schlep through the attic and over the roof Into the Chapel Mary had seen better days So I had a quick pray and we found Jesus The End Cheers
  8. firstly this place is massive and is so bland inside as everything in there is white and plain. there are a few things left inside but not a great deal. it has a swimming pool and snooker table and also has its own stables. found out about this place as a friend sent on info he had received and thought it was right up my street! not bad for a quick mooch, but its built strangly! having to go through one bedroom to get to another in one place. Visited with Katia (the girlfriend) the reason for the name, daimler owners car mags scattered around the place the stables
  9. The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. The building still stands unused. The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. The former Empire Theatre in St James’s Street needs urgent repair work carrying out on the crumbling Victorian structure. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building which has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†Fears are the deteriorating state of the Empire could sadly mean the final curtain for the 120-year old building which was once the pinnacle of Burnley’s entertainment scene. Roger Frost, chairman of the Burnley Civic Trust, fears for the future of the Theatre which has stood empty for nearly 20 years. “It has been an absolutely splendid building – when it was in its prime it was better than the Grand at Blackpool.†Pitch black inside, it was a sod to lightpaint, mainly 'cos I'm crap at it. Cheers
  10. Lancashire church that has been unused for a few years. There has been some signs of metal theft, but on the whole the interior was in pretty good condition.
  11. Just dropping in to say hi, been viewing from afar for a while now, and finally got round to registering (thought I had done already) Doh! Have been using DP, but recently have noticed a lot of people switching to this. I am a relatively experienced explorer, and have met quite a few of other members on here, hopefully more to come As soon as I have time I'll drop some reports on. Hopefully within the next day or two. Cheers Carl.
  12. It's been done a lot, but Me, Cloaked Up and True British Metal eventually made time in our schedules to get here. And blimey, they have been busy flogging the rides. Not much left at all, so we had a mooch and took some photos and left. Camelot Theme park is located in Chorley, Lancashire. The park opened in 1983 and was based on the story of ‘Camelot, King Arthur and the Knights of the round table’. Camelot has seen a downturn in attendance in recent years. In 1995, Camelot’s attendance was 500,000 visitors throughout the season. In 2005 Camelot’s attendance was only 336,204 visitors. On the 4th of November it was announced by it’s operators Knights Leisure that it will not be opening for the 2013 season due to the lack of visitors to it’s park. The rides so far have been relocated in Germany, Pleasureland Southport, Gullivers World Warrington and Matlock and Oakwood Park Wales. The Dragon Flyer is the worlds only remaining diesel powered roller coaster and will soon be moved to Pleasureland. Knightmare, a custom built Schwarzkpfy/Zierer roller coaster future is uncertain. But having already been relocated from a closed down park in Japan, and being one of only three coasters of its type, would be a shame not to see this move also. Cheers
  13. Have another one from the archives. It was a balmy August evening, wife and kids had gone out, nothing was stirring, not even a mouse. The architect employed by Mr. Maden Holt was E. Wyndham Tarn of London. The church, 120 ft. long and 53 ft. wide was built in the Early Pointed Gothic style from stone quarried on Mr. Holt's estate with pillars of polished red granite. Seating accommodation was provided for 1,000 people. The tower, which stands on the north side of the chancel, is surmounted by a spire 150 ft. in height. A small transept was built on the south side of the church. It was used originally as a pew for the Holt family but later the font was transferred to this chapel from its former position in the chancel. The church contains a baptistry for the immersion of adults. It is sunk in the chancel floor and is covered by an ornamental grating. When the Reverend Eddie Ashworth retired in 1999 the parish became a joint benifice with Holy Trinity Church, Stacksteads. The Church held its final service in October 2007 and the parish merged with Holy Trinity, Tunstead. Cheers
  14. OK, first post, be nice. This place has been on my radar for a while now. Was bored one Thursday evening, so Mrs NNN told me to bugger off with the camera. Went out and as night fell, thought that I'd have a look at location access. Yep, was easily doable. Went back the next evening, got in, and that was as far I would go by myself. My usual buddy couldn't make it the next week, so a local explorer on another forum joined me. We got in again and then discovered someone else had been in, as a ladder was in situ making life much, much easier. A little, bit of History; Accrington Conservative Club was one the largest ConClub in the UK. On its top floor was an impressive sprung ballroom, again one of the largest in the UK. Its impressive facade belies the rather insignificant location. In later years, it was known as Churchills Nightclub, which closed down in 2004 following the death of a customer. Since then it has been left to rot, a number of arson attacks over the years have taken its toll on the interior. The current owner has plans to demolish the building, keeping the frontage and developing the site into apartments, restaurants and a gym. Have a look; External by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Security by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Accringtons Premier Nightspot by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Going Down by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Ballroom Blitz by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Ballroom B&W by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Attic by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr I've drunk in worse places than this by nicky_nacky_noo, on Flickr Cheers
  15. Howdy from Lancashire

    Morning All, been doing this for approx a year now, still learning as I go regards the photo side. Been on another forum for a bit, time to spread those wings. I'll whack some stuff up in next day or so. NNN
  16. Whittingham Hospital opened officially on 1st April 1873, built by bricks made on site, the source being what became to be known as the "duck pond" but referred to on maps as the "fish pond". The kiln for the manufacture of the bricks was situated, apparently, in what is known "Super's Hill Woods", at the back of the hospital, on the road to Grimsargh. The hospital was built in four "phases", the first being St Luke's (the Main), followed by St John's (the Annex), then Cameron House, and lastly St Margaret's (the New or West Annex). In addition to these 'divisions' there was also a Sanatorium of fourteen beds built for Infectious Diseases, which became known as Fryars' Villa, later to become part of the accomodation for the resident staff. The hospital served the community for almost 150 years, and, in its' day, was a virtually self sufficient community. Proposal for an additional Asylum within Lancashire was called for and, following decisions as a result of the Local Government Act of 1888, it was decided to build an Asylum. The first choice of site was just behind Fulwood Barracks in Preston, but this gave way to a preferential site at Got Field Farm, to be known as Whittingham. This site was chosen, primarily, because there was a good natural supply of fresh water more readily available than other sites, and it was within easy reach of Preston. , ,
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