Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Lincoln'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings,Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 21 results

  1. Canwick Cemetery Chapel The Explore One from March last year. This place has been derelict for a number of years and I had been keeping an eye on the place for probably 2 years previous to that as I regularly had to drive past the cemetery. Around once a month I made a point of stopping, pretending to visit some dead-relatives' grave and when no one was looking used to hop the heras and check the doors. About a billion times they were the same as always and I cursed the local kids and drunks for being crap, until finally one day myself and @Urbexbandoned were on a stroll through the cemetery and noticed some fresh beer cans near the heras and the door looking ever so slightly ajar.. winner!. Couldn't have a look that day as a groundsman was busy astro-turfing a rectangle nearby but returned the next day for a solo visit, then a few days later with @Urbexbandoned. I don't think the assumed-drunk had entered as I had to push a layer of pigeon shit about 2 inches thick behind the door. No-one had been in there for a very long time and also it was a shame the wooden staircase up the bell tower had completely rotted away and collapsed at some point. A few people visited in the coming few months, then I noticed the door got boarded up again. The History Pair of former chapels, now disused. 1856. By Michael Drury. Coursed and squared rubble with ashlar dressings and plain tile roof. Gothic Revival style with pointed arched windows and Geometrical tracery. EXTERIOR: chamfered and moulded plinth, sill band, moulded eaves, coped gables with crosses and finials. North side has a central gable with an archway and shafts, flanked by single gabled buttresses. Beyond, single blocked 3-light windows. To left, the octagonal east chapel has angle buttresses and 3 gables, each with a 4-light window. Roof gablets. Fleche removed. To right, west chapel with apsidal end and buttresses, 3 bays, with six 2-light windows with hoodmoulds. In the north gable, a 5-light window. Square north-west tower, 3 stages, has to north a gabled doorway with shafts. Above, a trefoiled vescia piscis and to east, a 2-light window. Third stage has a foiled corbel table and to north, a rose window. On the other sides, 3-light windows. Spire removed. INTERIOR: east chapel has an arch braced conical roof with collars forming a corona. West chapel has a moulded stone arch to the apse, and an arch braced double purlin roof. Both chapels have foliage corbels - I have no idea what they are.. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Coffin shape on the ceiling.. 13. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  2. The Barbican Hotel in Lincoln was originally opened as a gentleman’s club in 1867. During the 1870s the building became the Albion Hotel, and was quite a prestigious place to stay in its time; an important early hotel which still retains original external features. During the 1980s the hotel was renamed to the Barbican. In 2006 eight people were rescued from a blaze started in a bedroom on the second floor. The Barbican Hotel closed during the 2000s and despite being purchased by developers in 2008 has stood empty ever since. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The entrance hall was quite nice... Note the dome shaped roof lantern in the bar... Some areas were suffering the neglect... And other areas were in good condition, and very hotely...
  3. ello again chaps and chapettes, i've already harped on about a load of nonsense nothing to do with the explore on my carlton theatre report so if you want some sort of personal intro and explanation about how the explore came about then id say go read the first paragraph of my carlton report and then come back to me diving straight in with the explore. The explore. Landed in lincoln about 20/30 mins before the other guys and proceeded to drive an oap special fish and chips with curry sauce into me before going for a wander around the perimeter of the site and getting an idea for what we were looking at once the other lads landed. the recce told me half the site is a building site and half the access to the site is tucked away at the back of a row of housing estates gardens, during my recce i also walked straight into the secca, i wasn't anywhere i shouldn't be but at the same time i had no good reason to be where i was with a camera and tripod hanging off me if you know what i mean, he defo knew what i was here for and didn't take his eyes off me as i pretended to be on the phone and looked like i was looking for house number along the row of houses opposite the main entrance. shortly after the lads landed aswell and we proceeded to wander the perimeter fence together, sods law as soon we walk within 20 feet of the fence mr secca strolls around the corner, just as im pointing out a potential weak spot in the fence, again we weren't anywhere we shouldn't be but now there was four of us wandering around looking rather suspicious, we walked around the public footpath and the whole time the secca staring at us, we walked into the housing estate to discuss our options as by this point secca was stood on top of a mound of earth on us like a hawk. we decided to cut through the housing estate and make our way around the front, once we had done a loop we were back where we started with no secca so swiftly over we went and in no time we were in, it was getting pretty dark pretty fast at this point but luckily we were armed with torches so wasn't too much of a problem apart from the potential for being easily spotted wandering around with torches of course! quite enjoyed the mooch in the dark, wasn't as creepy as you'd want an old asylum in the dark, think the place has lost a lot of its vibe through the building project but still has nice features in there. All in a nice little mooch and a good start to the weekend History St John’s Asylum in Lincolnshire, in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s. It was originally built to house just 250 patients, but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates as they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service. The asylum finally closed it's doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats. on with the picys thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy
  4. The Official sales chat - taken from the website Offering breathtaking views, first class facilities and superlative living accommodation in a location of international status, Lincoln Plaza is set to provide one of the most prestigious and sophisticated new landmarks on Canary Wharf’s iconic skyline. Soaring up to the 31st floor, Lincoln Plaza comprises two principal apartment towers - Franklin and Greenwich - together with a 12-storey international brand name 100-suite hotel which integrates with the two towers, allowing residents access to a fabulous array of lifestyle facilities. Adjacent is a 10 level ‘rotunda’ apartment building complimenting this striking new landmark against Canary Wharf’s dazzling architecture. Each apartment has been meticulously designed to create the perfect equilibrium of luxury quality and style, featuring comfort cooling, individually selected stone tiled flooring, SMEG kitchen appliances and Hansgrohe bathroom refinements. With all the exclusive facilities of a world class hotel, Lincoln Plaza is also set to deliver a comprehensive health club complete with spa, pool and fully equipped gymnasium, opulent entrance foyer with 24-hour concierge, business lounge, private cinema and four storey winter garden ‘sky lounge’ on the 22nd floor. The explore I got into the docklands area in the late evening looking to do a couple of roof top explores. After parking up at my usual car dumping spot (thanks Asda), I made my way across to the first location, which the last time I checked was completely abandoned & an easy one to say the least. Things had changed somewhat, with the site being live & from the looks of things, pretty active. The vantage point from there is somewhat mediocre from what I saw from other people’s past visits, so I decided to forget about it & moved on to the next place. The second location was pretty well guarded with cameras pointing at the most obvious entry points. The area was still pretty busy by this point, so I circled around the perimeter & took a walk over to my third potential location, Lincoln plaza. I had given this a look when I was in the area a few weeks back, & it looked pretty secure, & with lots of nosey bods about I decided against it. This time the situation was quite different! It was still quite lively, so I decided to take myself over to the dockside to take a few leisurely night shots, & more importantly kill some time. After a while I decided that I had frozen my arse off enough & decided to make a go for it. I waited until there was nobody around, then took my moment & snuck in, pausing momentarily behind the portaloo while a car zipped past. After a bit of fast pacing into the building I was at the core staircase. It soon became apparent why it was so easy to get in, because on every floor there was a shiny dome camera watching. They must have thought no one is dumb enough to proceed with all of this surveillance here, right? Wrong! I proceeded to make my way up, & getting tired of ducking my head down each time I passed one of these things I got cheeky & gave one a very sarcastic wave. I noticed soon after that there was a sound other than me moving. I stopped & listened through the central gap in the stairs, & sure enough, there was the sound of someone high tailing up the stairs after me…….obviously they didn’t take kindly to my brazened attitude! I picked up the pace & made it to the top floor, I stepped through the doorway & immediately paused. I heard the sound of either someone’s phone or radio playing music. I made a slow retreat back down to the floor below, & hid in a dark corner. I stayed there for an hour, waiting & listening to someone systematically opening the doors to each floor in search of me. I thought it was only a matter of time before I got caught, & I started to get a bit concerned as I was doing it lone wolf. But to my surprise, after a while whoever was on the lookout had buggered off & I was left to explore again. After checking the top floor once more, I concluded that whoever was camped up there wasn’t going to be moving any time soon. I admitted defeat & decided to call it a night. I felt a bit deflated, as my goal was to get to the roof & take some vista shots, which I obviously couldn’t do. So I began checking floors at random to see if there were any other vantage points to be had. I eventually came to a floor that had a door leading to a roof terrace, I immediately did a mini fist pump & thought “it’s back on!†I raced up the opposing tower core until I reached a skylight, & within about a minute I was on the roof. The views were pretty awesome, as are most high rises in London. One thing that became immediately apparent was the wind. I was totally exposed up there, & while trying my best to take long exposures I was getting absolutely battered. As a result the shots I got weren’t the best, but I think we’ve all been in that situation before! After soaking up the scenery for a good while, I decided that it was time to make a hasty retreat. I retraced my steps back to my original accent & made my way back down. To my shock there was no one around to greet me at the bottom, which was a big relief. When I stepped back into the public realm I was met by a passing couple on their way home. They looked pretty puzzled as I passed them, obviously from an outsider perspective it’s a bit weird for someone to be coming out of a building site on their own in the early hours of the morning! Let me know what you think of the shots, I’m pretty new to night photography so any CC would be appreciated. Note; the internal ones are just taken from my phone, as I wasn't really bothered about the inside tbh. Pinkman
  5. I didn’t think I would get the chance to see this place again, and this was one of my favourite explores… I was very keen to go back. And man was it worth it – I saw 4 times more than my last visit three years ago. It was a real privilege to see the cells, the hall, the grand staircase; and some more those iconic honeycomb ceilings. The building is extremely dicey in places – a lot worse than I remembered. Some floors are wonky, some floors are rotten… and some floors are missing altogether. That said, the natural decay in here is awesome. The site is being converted for housing. A lot of the foliage has been cleared, building work has begun, and the water tower controversially demolished. Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960’s it was known as St John’s Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main building. the cells the main hall the grand staircase Sorry its a bit pic heavy; but this was an awesome explore. One of my favourites
  6. RAF Stenigot Home Radar Station The Explore I’ve lived in and around the Lincolnshire area now for a good few years and always fancied taking a look at these massive dishes but they always seemed to be on the backup list if all the other backups failed. A friend had just received his shiny new 6D in the post and was eager to get out and have a go at some night-time star trail shots and we decided that the isolated, non-light polluted Stenigot site would be perfect for this. So last Friday night, instead of heading into town to drink Jager-bombs till our eyes bled in the hope of later finger-blasting some Uni students, we went to Morrisons instead to buy some sausage rolls and monster for the short drive to Stenigot. After completing the Lincolnshire Rally stage we carefully selected our parking space in the middle of a field The History (robbed) RAF Stenigot was opened in 1940 as an east coast Chain Home radar station. Stenigot provided long range early warning for raids from Luftflotte V and the northern elements of Luftflotte II along the approaches to Sheffield and Nottingham and the central Midlands. After the war, the station remained operational as part of the 'defended area', a line of chain home stations running down the east coast from Flamborough Head in Yorkshire and along the south coast to Portland Bill in Dorset. The equipment and buildings were removed in 1996 although the four parabolic dishes can still be seen lying on the ground close to the old chain home receiver block. All the other buildings connected with Ace High, including the police house have been demolished with only the concrete bases remaining to indicate their former positions. The Pictures 1. 2. At this point I said to my mate, "If there IS a bull we can easily jump up onto the dishes, it'll never be able to get up there".. He then showed me a YouTube clip of a bull jumping about 12 feet into a crowd and killing loads of people.. thanks for that.... 3. The one (originally four) remaining mast used for training by RAF Digby to the right... 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Then it started to get dark.. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Beam me up Scotty.. 15. 16. An edit my mate done with multiple hams, find all 9 if you can As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  7. I currently live about 2 miles from St. Johns and I've been driving past this place for almost a year now. Access has eluded me on a few previous failed attempts, but recently got lucky and spent 5 1/2 hours exploring the innards. I was conscious that this location has been reported on a lot so that day I tried to capture some different angles/areas that you may not have seen before. Some history shamelessly robbed from another user, coz that's how I roll mwahahaha... "Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960’s it was known as St John’s Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main building." I like to keep the history part short and sweet so that you all don't flatline before getting to the pics.... Some externals, including a few "externals from the internal" Thankfully they didn't.. Ventilation holes The curved ceiling which features throughout a lot of the hospital. Some say for it's sound-proofing qualities for noisy residents.. Peely delights Outer walkway Stage left Nursery In my element Taking the Pee We liked this flappy door Me, wondering how i'm going to condense 320 images into a report... Thanks a lot for taking the time to read my report, any feedback always welcome and appreciated. If you're planning on visiting here i'd do it soon, big plans kicking into action this summer on the redevelopment side.
  8. Lincoln Cathedral Roof The Explore A considerable amount of planning, recce'ing and good old fashioned snooping went into this one. Myself and Matt_Inked had been chatting about the possibilities of pulling this one off for quite a while. During a recent recce trip we were only expecting to confirm that it couldn't be done due to the immense about of CCTV around the place and rather high barricades. Literally 5 or 6 hours of walking around the Cathedral over several different days and a lot of time sittting in the car just staring up at the roof almost was enough send us on our ways defeated. But no, an oppurtunity presented itself and we returned a few days later for the entry and climb, then the ass-twitching descent.... The Recce's Western Elevation Brief History Lincoln Cathedral is a cathedral located in Lincoln in England and seat of the Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England. Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549). According to the cathedral website, over £1 million a year is spent keeping the cathedral in shape; the most recent project completed has been the restoration of the West Front in 2000, and a matrix of tall scaffolding is slowly making its way around the building... Top 'o' the scaff 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9/10. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  9. Visited With Hamtagger and Session9 Now Public thanks to the wonderful world of Social Media. After a successful morning in York and Leeds we decided to head for our "Main Splore of the Day" We decided that this weekend was the time to get the old girl done before it becomes impossible to enter or destroyed by the youths of Leeds. And getting inside was not an easy task, after checking all of the obvious spots and Hamtagger falling off a roof into a pool of 8 inch water. We decided that the only way in was potentially suicidal. So we went for it. And it was worth every second! Inside, the school really is a beauty, it feels like 3 different locations in one. A modern School, an Old School and a Hospital. I just wish we went there earlier because it was hard to get anything decent in the dark so we had to rush around in the last hour of daylight we had. History LGHS was founded in 1876, at a time when female education was limited but expanding. Frances Lupton and other members of the Ladies’ Honorary Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education decided that campaigning for access to the universities was of little use without better all-round education for girls, equivalent to what boys received at traditional academic grammar school. Established interests prevented the use of existing charitable funds, so Lupton and her colleagues created a new way forward: a joint stock company. The school motto was Age Quod Agis, which means "do what you do". While seemingly tautological at first glance, it is in fact a corruption of the Biblical exhortation, "whatsoever thy turn thy hand to, do it with all thy might". The pupils were divided into four houses, named after the four patron saints of the United Kingdom: Andrew, David, George and Patrick. Girls were placed into the houses that their families had been in before them. There were various house competitions throughout the year, mainly sports and arts orientated, the main one being the house music competition during the spring term. Pictures 1 Classroom 2 The Green Corridor 3 Fake Hospital Sign For the ITV Drama "Monroe" 4 Bathroom in the dark 5 Science Class 6 Classroom steps 7 Hallway steps 8 "Hospital" Props 9 Mattie's Cafe 10 Time to leave? 11 Darkness Falls 12 When you suck at night photography, light paint As always, Thanks for looking
  10. Today was my second explore, and I was accompanied by hamtagger It was however cut short by some of the lovely locals who were drinking at 11am and swinging a bat around. Most likely trying to strip what little copper is left in the building. (We didn't fancy having to go all Jackie Chan on them or risk getting our arses kicked and losing our cameras) So unfortunately we left a lot earlier than expected. Here's a bit of History on the place. Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI) was established in 1810 on land formerly part of Derby's Castlefield estate on land near what is now Bradshaw Way and the A6 London Road. It was known as the Derbyshire General Infirmary at the time. In 1890 a Typhoid outbreak sweeped through the hospital, and the buildings design was blamed. The hospital is entirely demolished, a year later Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone of what would become Derbyshire Royal Infirmary. The neo-Jacobean building was completed in 1894, and its main features were its 'Onion' shaped domed towers and its central corridor which ran the length of the hospital. The hospital was expanded at several points in the 20th century, the most visible being the still used Wilderslowe Tower and the now disused A+E building built in 1970. The DRI as a result is an architectural mish-mash with the original hospital at its heart. Buildings aside, the DRI was a pioneering hospital, the UK's first Flying Squad was set up here in 1955, in 1976 George Cohrane set up the first National Demonstration Centre for Rehabilitation and in 1992 the Pulvertaft Hand Centre was opened by the Queen, her grandson William was sent here seven years later following a rugby injury. In the late 90s, the NHS Trust's for each hospital in Derby merged, and drew up a dramatic plan to consolidate the services of both hospital's on one site. The so called 'super hospital', soon to be known as the Derby Royal Hospital is one of the largest in the region. There are no official plans to redevelop the now redundant Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, the land is covered by a large regeneration plan which will expand Derby's city centre southwards into what is known as Castleward. The 1987 built part of the hospital shall continue to provide medical care, providing the services of the closed Aston Hall and Grove Hospital's south of Derby. One of the corridors just as you walk in. I'm assuming all power is out in the Hosptial because after ringing the bell for a Uniform, Nobody came... I was quite shocked that these weren't smashed like every other bit of glass in there. Some doors through a hole I was also shocked that the locals hadn't taken this to Cash Converters Someone needs to work on their aim, this looks quite fresh too. A pressure...thing Window Close-up Someone has actually taken the time to smash each and every window. Did anyone on here leave the bottle of water? I'm assuming it was explorers by the size of it. Corpse is watching you. Creeping through the windows General Manager Door Sign I liked the look of this one That's all until next time. We're hoping to go back in a bigger group incase of another run in with the local doleys (Safety in numbers) Thankyou for taking time to read my report. I really enjoyed the short amount of time we spent here and can't wait to re-visit and get a better report and some more impressive pictures.
  11. Hello From Lincoln

    Hi my name's Matt, I'm from Lincoln and I've liked the idea of Exploring for about 4 years now. I've only just got around to doing it due to looking at sites like this and knowing that a lot of other people share my passion. My first explore was today. I went to Nocton Hall. I'm planning on tackling the rest of Lincolnshire as soon as possible too. I'll post a report on it asap.
  12. I wasn't sure about Nettleham Hall to begin with because I heard it's just ruins and not worth it, but it's not a bad place for a nice chilled out explore. It was impossible to find on Google maps but once I got to the gates I knew where I was. It would have been a nice place to visit when there was more of it left. It does have a kind of Tomb Raiderish feeling to it though. Although I found no ancient artifacts or snakes/tigers ect... Just ruins... History Lesson Nettleham hall was the home of the Hood Family, a very popular family within the village of Nettleham. The famliy decended from John Hood who was the first of the Hood family to occupy Nettleham Hall. John Hood whom accompanied General Monk from Scotland on his way to restore Charles II in January 1660. The main entrance is a magnificent set of wrought iron gates, these gates came from the demolished church of St.Peter at Arches Lincoln and were designed by Francis or William Smith circa 1720 with piers and flanking walls being dating from around 1890. The house had an underground system of tunnels to allow servants to move around the house. An old auction catalogue for the sale of the residence describes it as a charming stone built Georgian House with views of Lincoln Catherdral, it was sold with 3 acres of garden and 1,500 acres of shooting lands. Nettleham hall burnt down around 1937 in mysterious circumstances The Iron Gates Close Up of the gates Interior Walls Nature is taking over This tree coming from within the building shows how long it has been derelict Was this the old entrance? I felt like Lara Croft without boobs when I walked into this room. This building would have looked incredible from the inside years ago. This one's a bit dark The tunnel/cellar/basement part. There were candles inside on the concrete shelves. Shame this is out of focus a bit An old chimney? Not the nicest wallpaper I've ever seen... A cottage window Window Number 2 As always, thank you for taking time to read my report.
  13. Visited with Hamtagger After a recce 2 days previous we were itching to scale the Cathedral walls like ninjas. With cameras surrounding the building and nosey neighbours in every house, we knew we needed to be careful. The fact that the building is 700 years old made me a bit paranoid that if we used any part of it for support we would damage parts of it. I didn’t realise how high the building actually is until we were at the top! (510 feet above sea level) Climbing additional ladders at this height was enough to make my bum-hole twitch a bit too. The climb went well and it was nice to finally have got up there but I broke my toe on they way down with what was probably only a 6 foot drop. (I felt like a retard) :banghead History Lesson Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the TALLEST building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549). The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was never rebuilt. There are many legends and myths about the Cathedral and it's surroundings and it was also used in the movie "The Da Vinci Code" which is pretty cool if you haven't seen it. Finally, The famous Lincoln Imp - the little devil perched high in the Angel Choir overlooking St Hugh's shrine. He was turned to stone, according to the legend, by the angels because he caused mayhem in the Cathedral. He is now the symbol of Lincolnshire and the Lincoln football team (the Imps) External Jesus has been poo'd on Disturbing Headless Statues A skull eating a coin (This looks more modern than the others) A Fire Breathing Dragon (That scratches walls) No Admittance Almost at the top The Arch Me and Hamtagger Looking Across the City (I think thats the Priest/Organists house I really wanted to take pictures through these windows but didn't want to risk damaging the roof Probably shouldn't have used my flash at midnight Thank you for reading my report. This is definitely ones of my favourite places so far, shame about the lack of pictures (Some were taken on my iphone) but we had to be careful with people walking past every 5 minutes and walking on a 700 year old building.
  14. Well having seen Silent Hill's report I thought I'd chuck upsome of my photos. I'm with Silent about this place - it's a fabulous building and explore and I love it lots. it's one of the places that got me into Urbex. Once I saw "that" staircase I had to see it for myself and photograph it. Our first attempt saw us politely escorted off the premises by the Polish Man mountain but we vowed to return and so we did. On with the graphical representations: That Staircase Ghostly goings on An explore that towers over others a few more frames to come yet A few more shots of that staircase Time to say goodbye to the old place and there you have it folks - thanks for looking. If ever you needed evidence that it's the photographer that matters not the equipment ... these were all shot with a Canon G10 COMPACT camera
  15. The day began with hamtagger and i en route to Derby Royal Infirmary. There were a few undesirable chaps there weilding bats so we left after an hour or so. I still got an alright partial report out of it though (Feel free to check it out ) On the way back home to Lincoln we decided to make the most of the sun and head to Nocton to finish the bits we hadn't seen before. I'm struggling to find any pictures of Nocton back in the day, I'd like to do a comparison and see how it used to look... History Lesson RAF Hospital Nocton Hall was a 740-bed RAF hospital serving the predominantly RAF personnel based at the large number of RAF Stations in the area. It opened in June 1947. It was used by forces personnel, their families and local civilians until it closed on 31st March 1983. . The Hall was used as the Officers' Mess. It was also used by the USAF during the Gulf War and over 1,300 US medical staff were sent there. The chair with two legs, probably quite hard to keep your balance on this one. The arrow to nowhere, I'm curious to where it would have pointed to The end of the line The longest corridor I have ever had the pleasure of walking down The basement fireplace with some light from the window The place really is falling apart but I like the look of this one I have no idea how or why this room is full of tyres. Cobwebs on a door knob (That sounds like a song title) This room is called the "Sterile Area" I'm glad I wasn't a patient I've been told there were two of these. I wonder where the other one is And finally, my favourite photograph I've taken so far. I think it looks awesome personally and it was an accident Thankyou for taking time to read my report. To anyone considering Nocton for an Explore, go for it! It's a good place with a lot to see. The areas quiet too. Thanks to hamtagger for driving us there. I'll have another report up as soon as possible.
  16. Visited on a very cold, early morning during a Lincolnshire road trip I went on last winter. I was so cold and tired on this particular morning that I managed to forget to put on my shoes before leaving the car, so ended up doing the whole explore in my slippers! However, it was very much worth the numb feet, and I found it hard to drag myself away from the place. This really is a stunning example of a British Victorian Asylum. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed, keeping them safe from demolition. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.
  17. Ok peep's moving away from the schools for a while, we had a mooch around this place and to say it was dirty would be an understatement An iron foundry in North Hykeham, with a production capacity of approximately 80,000 tonnes of castings annually, they manufactured high quality iron casting components in nodular and grey iron for the international automotive, tractor and construction machinery industries. It closed in 2007
  18. Just thought i would pop in here to introduce myself before i begin spamming your lovely reports I'm currently living in the lincoln area (as the title hints towards hah). I've always been into the exploring side but usually just for the fun of it, the interest in old buildings, but sometimes just plain old nosey-ness. In the last year i've become more and interested in the photography side of it so on my last few explores i took my new camera and grabbed some pics. Still the amateur photographer/pic-taker, but i love exploring new places . Lincolnshire is pretty rich in locations so looking forward to this summers expeds! I'll spend a while familiarising myself with the layout of the forums, then i'll chuck up a few reports to see what ya's think! My favourite colour is black, my shoe size is 8 3/4, and i once ran into a really clean window in KFC thinking is was an entrance. Cheers for reading my blurb
  19. A little wonder around the St johns Asylum in Lincoln So close to getting inside but to many people around which i was Gutted but at least i got to see the external Maybe some one could take me in the future eh A bit of History, The Asylum (St John’s Mental Hospital) closed down in 1990 and was sold a few years later to a property developer who has constructed nearly 1,000 new houses in the village. The original hospital buildings themselves are classified as Grade III listed buildings and are protected from demolition. During the redevelopment of the hospital site, a number of these protected buildings were refurbished and converted into flats and offices. On with the pictures hope you like. Thanks for looking
  20. Oldish report from November last year. Got caught by some contractors in here and they weren't best pleased. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats.
  21. I thought I would put up a report to warm me up on here. You all know the history, this was my second time round the place-this time with Shatners and Skanky. Good times. And those stairs.... Full set including my shots from first visit on my Flickr. Thanks

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×