Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Liverpool'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings,Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 41 results

  1. I've got a bit of a thing for theatres and cinemas and this one had been tightly sealed for many years and had the reputation of being a real tough nut to crack. When I heard there was a whiff of a chance I realised that I had to act quick if I was to get inside this rather special place. I'm certainly glad I made the effort! Here's a bit of history n' stuff - The ABC Cinema is Grade II listed. It rounds the corner of Lime Street and is one of the first historic buildings, still standing, that visitors see when leaving Lime Street Station. ABC acquired the building in 1930, known as The Forum, it opened a year later to become one of the finest cinemas of the era. The six storey exterior was designed by A. E. Shannon and its sleek portland stone has very little decoration other than motifs over the entrance. Despite this, the building remains a very distinct feature on Lime Street. The building is listed for its grand interior, which was later subdivided, which is said to remain one of designer William R. Glen's best cinemas. There's a news report from December 2016 reporting that the City Council had sold the building to Neptune Investments who say “The next major phase of Lime Street regeneration is now coming forward with the refurbishment and re-opening of the former ABC cinema building on the corner of Lime Street as a major new music and live entertainment venue for the city.” A planning application is due to be submitted shortly, with an aim of giving the city a venue of "international standing", that will see the former cinema converted to hold crowds of up to 1,500 for live performances in its famous auditorium, with complementary ancillary uses.
  2. History Victoria Tower, which is also known locally as ‘the Docker’s Clock’, is a Grade II listed Gothic Revival clock tower located alongside Sailsbury Dock in Liverpool. It was designed by Jesse Hartley, an eminent engineer who was responsible for the construction of a large number of the docks and warehouses along the River Mersey. Hartley’s design was inspired by the castle architecture of the Rhine region in Central Europe; this is why the structure was built using irregular blocks of grey granite and why it has embrasures that have been cut into the tower’s walls. The tower was built between 1847 and 1848, to commemorate the opening of Sailsbury Dock. It was also constructed to aid ships using the port. It allowed them to set the correct time as they sailed out into the Irish sea (the time ball was apparently controlled by a signal from the Liverpool Observatory) and was equipped with a bell to warn vessels of impending meteorological changes such as high tide and fog. A navigation light encased inside an ornamental structure was originally planned for the roof of the tower; however, a 9 metre flagpole was installed instead when it was agreed that the structure would not function as a lighthouse. An additional lesser known feature of the tower is that the bottom three levels of the structure served as a flat for the Pier Master. These floors were boarded and designed to be much more comfortable than the rest of the building. On account of the decline in shipping along the Mersey, the condition of Victoria Tower has deteriorated significantly, primarily due to water and wind damage. In addition to these problems, the tower has become overgrown with vegetation over the years, and is now also infested with a large number of pigeons. Although it was announced in 2010 that the clock tower, along with several other historic buildings around the area, would be repaired and fully restored as part of a £5.5 billion restoration programme, no work has yet been initiated. Our Version of Events It was getting late on in the evening and we were all keen to get back to our digs for the night to drink beer and play poker, but we also wanted to have a quick wander over to Victoria Tower. We’ve stared at it enough times from the other side of the water, so it seemed about time we paid it a visit. Plenty of fucking around certainly ensued trying to figure out which part of the dock we had to trespass on to get to it; as we were to discover, it’s situated on a piece of land that’s tricky to get to if you’re not very familiar with the area. But, in the end we figured out where we needed to be; right on the other side of a drive-thru movie night. We entered through the main gates of one of the dockyards and wandered towards a small congregation of cars. The plan had been to blend in, but having left the car behind this was very difficult. Fortunately, however, the film was a decent one: Die Hard 1. And we’d entered at the good bit – the scene on the rooftop where Alan is making a last-bid attempt to get rid of Bruce. At this stage in the film Bruce’s vest top was well and truly green. Using the film to our advantage we crept through the cars. We passed a blue Ford Fiesta first, where, much to our delight, the couple inside seemed distracted enough without the film. It looked as though the woman in the passenger seat had dropped her revels somewhere on the driver’s side and was frantically looking for them. She had her head positioned over the driver in a very unusual position. The driver seemed to be helping to force her head down a bit lower too. There must have been an orange flavoured one in his lap or something. A red Volkswagen Golf had to be passed next. The passengers in this one didn’t seem to be focused on the film either though. A rather large flabby woman in her late 50s was pressed up against the windscreen, with both enormous breasts, a cheek and two plump lips firmly plastered against the glass. To our horror she was bouncing up and down a bit, so her folds sounded a bit like window wipers in turbo mode during a heavy downpour. Slightly scarred, psychologically, we made it to the other side of the dockyard. From here to the tower the journey was much less eventful. We had to make haste, however, since the tall palisade gates at the entrance would be closing soon – as soon as the movie was finished. Nothing like a bit of time pressure to spur you on. Unfortunately, though, when we did finally reach the door to the tower we quickly discovered that it was locked up tight. A bit frustrated that we’d already used up some of our gambling and drinking time, we decided to get the ball sacks out and climb our way inside instead. A tiny barred gate wasn’t stopping us from getting into the tower! It was around the halfway mark that we decided the climbing part of the plan was a bad idea. It was a chilly night and much more difficult that we’d first imagined. Hartley didn’t think it through when he designed overhanging ledges on the tower, which are now caked in a fine layer of slippery moss and pigeons’ cloacal secretions. Nevertheless, we’d watched the classic Stallone movie Cliffhanger three nights previously, so we knew we should probably just man the fuck up and get the climb done. Each of us had more than a t-shirt on too, so I don’t know what we were complaining about. We reached the top just as Alan was hanging off the side of Nakatomi Plaza. Everyone gathered at the top of the tower and peered through the crenels as Alan was plummeting to the ground; we were glad we’d made it in time to see the best scene in the film. You know what they say after all, it’s not really Christmas until Hans Gruber falls from a building. A few minutes were spent taking shots from the roof, but it was very a windy evening so the tripods ended up taking quite a battering. In the end we had to make do with the few usable nightscape shots we’d managed to take. Some luck was on our side, though, since some thoughtful chavs, who I presume were wearing Burberry check, had smashed the lock off the hatch. This made getting inside the tower much easier. An explosion of pigeony disease-ridden gas erupted as we lifted the lid. It smelt like thousands of them were down there, slowly drowning in their own shit and piss. For some reason we decided to crack on anyway, as you do. So, we climbed down the several broken rungs we could see into the depths of the festering pit of doom. A very sketchy bendy ladder came next. It was clearly some sort of improvisation to make up for the lack of staircase. At the bottom the situation didn’t improve either, as we found ourselves literally knee deep in shit and rotting carcasses. Pigeon pie was definitely off the menu later that evening. We hastily plodded on, racing down the rusted spiral staircases, trying our best not to disturb the crusted layers of poo. After all, you can’t leave an explore until you’ve seen absolutely everything there is to see. We didn’t hang about inside the tower for long after reaching the bottom, especially since we’d recently discovered that you can catch Chlamydia psittaci from contaminated bird droppings. That’s right, you can catch ‘the clam’ while urbexing! Although, having said that, this type is definitely a lot worse than the kind you’ll get from having ‘protected’ sex with a resealable sandwich bag. Anyway, back to the story. We managed to get back out onto the street just as the credits of the film were rolling down the screen. Thank fuck too, because climbing the fence would have been shit! After that we headed back to the car and, for most of us, this signified the end of the night where the rest of the evening would be spent drinking beer and playing several games of poker and pigeon toss (it sounds like a dirty game, but we assure you it’s quite innocent). Explored with Ford Mayhem, Rizla Rider, Husky and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  3. hello all. just thought I would introduce myself...im 6ft 2 31 years or age male from Liverpool. im a newbee and very adventurous and daring with a great personality. I know Liverpool offers a new world of hidden gems to explore. willing to try anything; even if its risky. i am looking to meet a few fellow explorers. msg back plz $ j
  4. The Explore Another early morning of explores in Liverpool city centre and again tried the Futurist with no luck (one day we will get in there somehow) ended up in the old X in the City strip club.. lets just say this brought back some fond memories Explored with @The Man In Black The History X in the City has now moved from to Wood Street in the city centre, the local council tried its best to stop the move but £80,000 deal was struck and the club moved locations leaving this one abandoned. X in the City is Liverpool’s number one lap dancing bar for stag nights. Hundreds of groups of lads come to X in the City throughout the year for their stag nights and most return when the next stag night comes round. The reason for this is that the atmosphere is perfect for stag nights. Unlike other lap dancing bars, at X in the City you can stand at the bar and enjoy a pint, or watch one of the many stage shows, or sit at a table with the company of a gorgeous girl.
  5. Visited this spot in March with a friend of mine who is not a member of the forum. Rotten to the core this one, dodgy floors that got worse as you went nearer to the section where the roof/ceiling has collapsed taking two floors with it. In this area there is quite big holes in the flooring and parts of the ceiling don't look to great. Parts of the basement where interesting with one section looking like a room had collapsed from the above floor leaving it on a strange angle. Bit of a mad mooch this one, worth a look if you are in the area I'd say. Built around 1800 as a private residence called Kelton with extensive land/gardens and a lodge. Around 1900, the Catholic Church purchased it as a home for "Penitents and Children" and was part of the "Sacred Heart convents", it was also known as the Kelton (House of Providence)". Basically it was a home for "Unmarried Mothers", the children were adopted off and the mothers were effectively in servitude, usually working in laundries. At some time the two hall extensions and chapel were built, another large building was built on the land which may have been a laundry. The convent appears to have closed in the early 1980s. The lodge is now fully restored and is a private residence, most of the land has been built on, there was a developer interested in the convent, planning permission was applied for but he went bust before getting started. FROM 2008 Around £7.5m is to be spent to restore a derelict former convent in South Liverpool into luxury apartments The former Kelton Convent, Woodlands Road, Aigburth, will be converted into 14 apartments and 26 new flats will also be built in two new wings in the grounds to help pay for the restoration of the existing grade II listed buildings. Liverpool councils planning committee heard yesterday that without the new flats the restoration would not be possible as the work will cost £7.5m but the apartments will sell for less than £5m. Five nearby residents wrote to the council to oppose the scheme for a variety of reasons which included protests about the increase in traffic in the area and loss of amenity. Architect Richard Cass told the committee that the building would be restored to its former glory. I guess this is the failed attempt at renovation of the convent. Thanks For Looking
  6. The Explore When I seen a report of this place pop up I had to get back over to Liverpool and check it out.. going to school just down the road the thought of getting inside Holly Lodge as a teenager was like a dream haha... fast forward 20 odd years and I finally get inside although for an entirely different reason Like a buy one get two free explore this with the hospital and police station sets adding to the interest of the place.. all in all a nice little explore with @The Man In Black The History Holly Lodge started out life in 1828 as a detached Georgian house in West Derby, Liverpool. The house became part of Holly Lodge Girls' College, and was in use until 2015 when a new college was built within the grounds. The building is due to be demolished to make way for nearly 60 new houses being built by Redrow. The site includes two Grade II listed buildings, Fremont and Sandheys - which will be saved as part of the proposals. Since its closure, the buildings have been used for filming, including sets for a police station, a prison and a hospital. The sets comprise mainly corridors and only a few other rooms. The School The Hospital The Police Station
  7. The Explore Tried this one a few times with no luck at all so very happy to finally get inside! Quite a personal one for me this as it was were I watched my first movie at the cinema (Superman 4).. strangely the place doesn't look anything like I remember it, only the entrance area seemed familiar to me. The History 'Opened as the Forum Cinema on 16th May 1931 with Clifford Mollison in “Almost A Honeymoon”. It was designed by William R. Glen and Alfred Ernest Shennan for Associated British Cinemas(ABC) at a cost in excess of 200,000 pounds. A massive six-storey curved Portland stone facade remains a distinctive and highly prominent feature of Lime Street – one of Liverpools major thoroughfares. The foyer was lined with Italian marble. The auditorium, in a semi-Atmospheric style, depicted Venetian scenes, contains an amazing proscenium treatment consisting of a vast curved canopy over the arch and the side boxes. Indirect light light was a feature, except for a huge ‘sunburst’ light fitting above the balcony. A shallow stage was provided together with a Compton 3Manual/12Ranks organ on a lift in front of the stage, which was opened by organist Reginald Foort. Because of the relatively small width of the site the 1,835 capacity was achieved by having a huge circle containing 750 of the seats. It was re-named ABC from 17th February 1971 and due to its opulence and excellent location the cinema survived intact until 1982 when it was converted to a three screen operation by installing two mini-cinemas under the balcony seating 272 and 217 seats. From 1986 it had been re-named Cannon. It closed on 29th January 1998 with a special screening of Humphrey Bogart in “Casablanca”, when a special admission fee of 50p was charged. There were proposals to convert the building into a conference centre, but these stalled and the building has stood empty since closing. Proposals were put forward in late-2007 to convert it into a ‘boutique’ hotel and supper club, with plans going to Liverpool City Council in July 2008 and if permission was granted, work could start in late-2008. The building remained unused in April 2012. It is Grade II Listed building.'
  8. The Explore One of them spare of the moment explores after a visit to the Canon cinema in the city centre a friend and fellow explorer tipped us off about an old church in Wavertree so we headed on down.. Surprised to see a fully in tact organ considering how long this has been abandoned! The History The Lawrence Road Methodist Church was erected in 1903 and is an attractive Italianate building constructed of high quality red brick, with plentiful stone dressings and elegant arched stained glass windows. It retains great character and makes a very positive contribution to the quality of the local built environment.
  9. The Explore So after a few unsuccessful attempts in the city centre and a brief visit to Newsham Hospital morgue we headed to meet a friend to explore some underground tunnels. Something very different for me as only ever really explored buildings but the history of this tunnel was a great place to start. The History Running to Crown Street Station, 1829. Built by George Stephenson, a single track tunnel 291 yards long was bored from the deep cutting at the Edge Hill junction to Crown Street, to serve the world's first passenger railway station. However the tunnel is: The dilapidated state of the Cutting today. The left 1846 tunnel is used for parking trains. The others tunnels are disused. The dilapidated state of the Cutting from the air. Looking from the east The 1846 Tunnel at the bottom - looking from the west. The cutting is at the top. The oldest rail tunnel in the world running under streets The second oldest rail tunnel in the world after the very short 1804 tunnel at Pentrebach, Merthyr Tydfil. Being too far from Liverpool city centre, the passenger station was abandoned in 1836 in favour of Lime Street. The area was converted for freight use. An additional two track tunnel was bored through to Crown Street from the Edge Hill cutting in 1846, to increase traffic to the freight yard. The head of this tunnel was initially cut to about 3 metres deep in 1829 and used as a store room. The freight yard was closed in 1972 along with the original 1829 Stephenson tunnel. The Crown Street portal is landscaped over showing no trace of the tunnel at Crown Street apart from an incline of grass near the tall brick Wapping tunnel ventilation shaft, which was initially in the passenger station and then freight yard. The historic 1929 Crown Street Tunnel is partially collapsing at the Crown Street end, due to lack of maintenance, as the subsidence in the street surface above indicates. This is how the tunnels looked back in the day... Things aren't quite as grand now unfortunately... Looking directly up the air shaft And finally the still used track were trains are occasionally backed in and parked
  10. The Visit Quite a spare of the moment visit late one night when an old security guard told us the way in surprisingly.. For the scale and size of the building it was a bit of a disappointment as every floor was stripped bare and just rows and rows of columns.. may visit in daylight to see if it looks any different but heres some pics anyway The History Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, (Stanley Dock, Liverpool, England) is a grade II listed building and is the world's largest brick warehouse. Standing 125 foot (38 m) high, the building was at the time of its construction in 1901, claimed to be the world's largest building in terms of area. The 14 storey building spans across 36 acres (150,000 m2) and its construction used 27 million bricks, 30,000 panes of glass and 8,000 tons of steel. The overall design is by A.G. Lyster, the Dock Engineer, but Arthur Berrington almost certainly played a part. The warehouse was a late addition to the Stanley Dock complex and was built on land reclaimed from the dock. Stanley Dock is accessible from the dock system or by barge from the Leeds and Liverpool Canal which enters under Great Howard Street bridge. With the decline of trade going through Liverpool, the warehouse fell into disuse in the 1980s and gradually into disrepair. More recently the building has featured in the Stop the Rot conservation campaign by the Liverpool Echo newspaper. Part of the ground floor of the warehouse is used for the Sunday Heritage Market. Various plans have been unveiled for the Tobacco Warehouse to be redeveloped into several hundred apartments as part of a larger development of the whole Stanley Dock site. The plans involve hollowing out the centre of the warehouse to create a garden-filled courtyard.
  11. The Visit Having tried this in the past with no luck and wanting to see this building for a while now I had to make the journey back to Liverpool to try, try and try again and luck was on my side this time. Have to say it was well worth the journey. Only hope that no "undesirables" get in this building and cause any damage. The History The Greenbank Drive Synagogue was built in 1936/7 and is the work of the notable Liverpool architect Sir Ernest Alfred Shennan. Most of his other work is also in Merseyside and comprises a diversity of building types. His inter-war designs included Westminster Banks; five cinemas including the listed Forum Cinema on Lime Street, Liverpool; restaurant interiors (The French Café and Arabic Café, both 1933, Liverpool); dance halls (The Grafton Rooms, Liverpool, 1934); hotels and office blocks. Greenbank Drive is Shennan’s only synagogue and is very different to the rest of his oeuvre up to that time which, apart from the banks, was distinctive art deco. To put this building in context: in the first half of the 20th century, Anglo Jewry did not enthusiastically adopt international modern architecture for its new synagogues and community buildings. (This is in dramatic contrast to Jewish Community buildings in Palestine and the emergent State of Israel during the 30’s and 40’s, which produced the most extensive legacy of modern movement buildings anywhere.) Owen William’s Dollis Hill Synagogue (1936, now mutilated) was the only genuinely modern movement synagogue. Though there are some impressive deco influenced synagogues dating from the late 1920s, they are all to some degree exercises in historicism, often combined with exoticism. (See for example the splendid Byzantine art deco of the former Leeds New Synagogue, now the Northern School of Contemporary Dance, 1938 by J Stanley Wright and Clay.) Greenbank Drive is very different as in its design Shennan produced a synthesis of his previous art deco style and other modern architectural tendencies. It directly reflects Swedish architectural influences, both in the exterior of the building, which is clearly inspired by the late fruition of the Swedish national romantic style, and in its interior, which draws on contemporary Swedish functionalism. In consequence, Greenbank stands alone as a synagogue which is really significant in terms of the progressive architecture of its time. Although clearly not ‘international modern’, it was a genuine attempt at a new architecture appropriate for a modern synagogue, and succeeds in these terms. We are for once looking forward, not back to an exotic past.
  12. History: Built in the 1930’s The Ark is not a traditional synagogue, but is certainly in keeping with the Art Deco style of the era. The building incorporated a number of architectural advancements to successfully create a modernised synagogue experience. The amazing space is inviting and has an intimate feel despite being huge – there was seating for around 700 people. The light flooding in from the windows around the top creates a light and airy feel. Explore: This was the second location we visited on my little trip up north, and had the pleasure of visiting here with loocyloo, redhunter and whynotdie. safe to say this was a relativity uneventful explore, but a lovely quiet one nonetheless. I think the most dramatic thing was a hunt for a torch loocyloo decided to loose! Wanted to visit this place for a while, and i'm glad i finally got the chance. The place is looking a little worse for wear now, with signs of graffiti and vandalism present - a real shame for such a beautiful building. As always, thanks for looking!
  13. Can't find any reports from this despite it closing 4 years ago. Demolition now looks set to go ahead so it's worth having a nose around if you live up there.... http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/ogdens-imperial-tobacco-site-set-10076751
  14. Number four of my hundreds of back logged reports to do! Can i first of all apologise for the angle of my images, these were taken on my S5 Visited with -Raz- and 2 non members on our trip around Lancashire. The Explore; At first we were sure we werent going to get into this building as every door, door window, nook and cranny seemed to be well secured. However after a quick stroll we found an access point. Once inside we made our way through what resembled a working mens club but we paid little attention to this until we were leaving, as we were dying to see the main hall. After a quick scope around we found the hall and all went our seperate ways to each take in the location as we wanted. this building has the tell tale signs of small scale looting by either pikeys or other undesirables but is for the most part a very tidy location and makes for a good explore! Unfortunately we only had limited time on this location as we needed to do another before returning to Yorkshire so a revsit is well needed! Bit of background; Greenbank synagogue was built in 1936 to a design by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan and consecrated on August 15,1937. It became a refuge for homeless families in the Blitz. This historic city synagogue which closed after 70 years has been saved for future generations. The building shut for good on January 8 after its congregation dwindled to fewer than 40, with only one service being held a week. But its survival is now assured after its listed building status was upgraded to Grade II*, putting it on a par with Croxteth Hall and the Cunard and Port of Liverpool buildings. English Heritage agreed the change after a plan emerged to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The organisation’s report described the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€. It added: “It has an important socio-historic significance as an inter-war synagogue of 1936-7 that represents one of the last free cultural expressions of European Jewry before the Holocaust.†The upgrading from grade II to II* status puts the former synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the country Now for some photos; Thanks for looking Find more on my page @ www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  15. As Hitler's bombs rained down, thousands of people were forced underground for shelter,about 1,200ft of shelter was built to protect them. The murals were first discovered back in 2005.. Splored in 2011 Thanks....
  16. While doing some research I came across this great looking building with recent images. I noticed lights on in the images, maybe a permission visit or the power has just been left on. I didnt check too much into it I added it to the list and carried on my research in the area. We arrived around midday in what was quite a busy area, it didn't look promising. We wandered around the buuilding to see if there was any possible access. There were people inside. I tried the fromt door with no answer, while trying to communicate with a lady through a closed window I was calld by others in my group. "Its open there is an art exhibition on." We popped in for a quick look and decided it was worth a few shots. We asked about taking photos, it was fine other than one exhibit. Well we didn't want the exhibits in our shots anyway! Founded in 1971 by Edward Rushton, after his sight was impaired when contracting ophthalmia. This was the first school of its kind in Great Britain and only the second in the world after one in Paris. The original building was in built in an neo-classical design and later there was an extension which is more of an art deco style. I know its a bit different but I hope you enjoy. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. I hope you enjoyed you can find a few more shots here The Old Blind School
  17. Beautiful building this is. Such a shame to see it go to waste and ruin. Hopfully it will be saved soon! Shalom! Greenbank synagogue was built in 1936 to a design by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan and consecrated on August 15,1937. It became a refuge for homeless families in the Blitz. This historic city synagogue which closed after 70 years has been saved for future generations. The building on Greenbank Drive, Sefton Park, shut for good on January 8 after its congregation dwindled to fewer than 40, with only one service being held a week. But its survival is now assured after its listed building status was upgraded to Grade II*, putting it on a par with Croxteth Hall and the Cunard and Port of Liverpool buildings. English Heritage agreed the change after a plan emerged to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The organisation’s report described the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€Â. It added: “It has an important socio-historic significance as an inter-war synagogue of 1936-7 that represents one of the last free cultural expressions of European Jewry before the Holocaust.†The upgrading from grade II to II* status puts the former synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the country. Thank You Please!
  18. La Bateau has been closed for a few months, coming on a year, the front looks like shit and they have recently put scaffolding up in order to begin refurbishment of the entire pub/venue. The scaffolding will make it so easy to gain entry as there is open windows on the second and third floors of the building so it would just be a case of gaining access without passersby noticing, maybe get in at dawn and start shooting? If anyone else has any info/previous entries/wants to come with I'd love to get my first explore under my belt!!! La Bateau, Duke St, Liverpool, U.K.
  19. Kelton convent. Been keeping my eye on this place for some time now finally got my chance and would you believe it all I have with me is a old digital camera and no torch witch explains the bad flash photography. AROUND £7.5m is to be spent to restore a derelict former convent in South Liverpool into luxury apartments. The former Kelton Convent, will be converted into 14 apartments and 26 new flats will also be built in two new wings in the grounds to help pay for the restoration of the existing grade II listed buildings. Liverpool council’s planning committee heard that without the new flats the restoration would not be possible as the work will cost £7.5m but the apartments will sell for less than £5m. Architect Richard Cass told the committee that the building would be restored to its former glory. Thanks for looking.
  20. Gateacre Community Comprehensive School opened in 1957,the lower block was the only building there until 1961 when the main block was added. Once completed it consisted of 4 floors A,B,C,D, 3 Gyms,3 Halls,3 Canteens,4 Playgrounds,1 Craft ,Design & Tech wing,1 Swimming Baths & countless classrooms. There were over 300 pupils & only 7 staff at the time before the main block was added.. Gateacre's first headmaster,Mr Hughes laid down the ethos of the school motto, "suum cui que in gen ium" which apparently means "each to his own ability".I Am unsure if he actually designed the school badge but it has remained unchanged since the school was first opened.. A new school building was commissioned to be built in the neighbouring area of Belle Vale. The new building has cost over £35 million and plans have been made to include high tech features such as solar panels, wind turbines and a cyber cafe. The new building can now be easily identified opposite Belle Vale Shopping Centre. The official school website has listed what the building will include: A 300-seater purpose-built theatre to provide a showcase for music, drama, film and dance performances A music recording studio and film studio, music practice rooms, composition suite and orchestral area. A 4-court sports hall, with lifestyle fitness suite, dance and activity studio and teaching area Outdoor hard-courts, sports fields, time-trial and assault course. Complete wi-fi coverage over the entire building for anytime, anywhere computer access. Flexible classrooms which can be cofigured into different areas to enable individual tuition, small group-work, whole class activities and mass presentations. The "innovations suite" which will contain the most up to d ate big screen and interactive technology. A suite of 10 laboratories and outdoor science garden for learning in all sciences. Practical technology areas, graphics and electronics studios and outdoor vocational workshop. An open plan arts studio area providing accommodation for fine arts, sculpture, ceramics, photography and textiles design. The new Gateacre Community Comprehensive School will open on Monday 12th September 2011... I couldnt resist the offer of a last look around as i attended this school for four & a half years & still have many fond memories,it was kinda strange going back after all these years. At the moment the school is half way through a big clear up operation,packing items to be transfered over to the new school. On completion it will become a demmolition site immediately as it is prime land... Few old pics.. Below is a model of the school before it was built. I think there may have been some bits added on and remodelled since then! Main building.. Lower building.. Hall (lower building) Once a canteen area (lower building) Lower building classroom.. LB9 (lower building 9) Lower building.. Lower building gym.. ..& changing room.. Play yard 1 was just in front of the lower building,it has been built on.. Play yard 2 between the lower gym, main hall & canteen.. Craft,Design & Tech wing is just off the Main Building.. Main building hall with canteen area at rear.. Rear of main building play yard 3.. Boys gym off the main building.. Main building library.. B4 - my old form room.. Art class..
  21. What a place, it's practically like a museum with all the religious artefacts, old photographs and documents left behind. The last I heard a local Rabbi has now taken the Torah scrolls to safety so we were lucky to have seen them on our viit. I visited with a non-member. This synagogue was designed by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan, famous for designing many cinemas in the area. The foundation stone was laid on 14th June 1936 by Baron Tobias Globe in the presence of Dr J.H. Hertz, the chief Rabbi of the British Emire at the time. The building was consecrated on 15th August 1937. During the Second World War the synagogue became a refuge for families who had been rendered homeless by heavy bombing during the Blitz. Over the years eventually the congregation dwindled in size until there were less than 40 regular worshippers and only one service per week so on January the 8th 2007, the doors finally closed after almost 70 years. The building was already listed but in 2008 the status was upgraded to a Grade II listing. English Heritage agreed the change after plans were filed which proposed to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The listing report describes the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€Â, and the upgrading puts the synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the UK at this time. The pics, a few the same as everyone else's and hopefully a few different ones: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Thanks for looking
  22. Cains is a brewery in Liverpool, England, founded in 1858 by Robert Cain. The company, with its 200 pub estate, merged with Walkers of Warrington in 1921, with the brewery operation being taken over by Higsons in 1923. Boddingtons of Manchester took over in 1985, and shut it down in 1990. It was reopened by GB Breweries, who became part of Bryggerigruppen in 1991, and in 2002 was sold to Gardener-Shaw for £3.4 million. The Cains brewery was founded by Irish immigrant Robert Cain in 1858 when he was able to buy an established brewery. Cain had begun his brewing career aged 24 when he purchased a pub and brewed his own ales. Within 25 years of founding his brewery, Cain had established 200 pubs, including the Philharmonic Dining Rooms, the Vines and the Central Commercial Hotel, which are currently listed as being of architectural merit. His personal mansion had each window arch inscribed with his monogram. In 1887 construction began on a second brewery. In 1921, 14 years after Cain's death, the Cains brewery merged with Walkers of Warrington becoming Walker Cains. Then in 1923 the original Stanhope Street Brewery was sold to Higsons, who continued to brew Cains ales. In 1985, Higsons was bought by Boddingtons of Manchester. Five years later Boddingtons opted to concentrate on pub ownership and sold all its breweries to Whitbread, at which point the Stanhope Street site was closed. However, not wishing to see the Cains name die, the Danish Brewery Company reopened the site. The new Robert Cain & Co Ltd faced financial disaster in 2002, but was rescued by the Dusanj brothers — the first Asian owners of a British brewery. At the time it had a turnover of £30 million. A reverse takeover of AIM-listed pub operator Honeycombe Leisure plc was agreed by the company’s board in June 2007, giving Cains access to Honeycombe's 109 outlets and their stock market listing. The company was renamed Cains Beer Company PLC. On 7 August 2008 the company was placed in administration following problems caused by an unpaid tax bill. Negotiations with its bank failed to reach a conclusion that would have avoided administration. The brewery and eight original pubs have since bought back by the Dusanj brothers. Cains website > http://www.cains.co.uk/index/articles_view.php?article_id=45&main_cat=0&cat_id=46&first_art=true&logger_name=The%20Story NOW MOTHBALLED....... Robert Cain.. Can room.. Brew house.. Hops room.. thanks...
  23. Info taken from Wikipedia... Littlewoods Business Empire. John, Colin Askham and Bill Hughes were friends who had worked together as Post Office messenger boys in Manchester. It was whilst looking for a new money-making idea that Moores came across John Jervis Barnard, a Birmingham man who had latched onto the public's growing passion for two things: football and betting. Moores had always been an avid football fan from when he was very young. Sports of all kinds had always interested him, He played amateur football himself until retiring at the age of 40. Barnard had devised a 'football pool', where punters would bet on the outcome of football matches. The payouts to winners came from the 'pool' of money that was bet, less 10 per cent to cover "management costs". It had not been particularly successful. Clearly, Barnard was struggling to make a profit, Moores got hold of a Barnard pools coupon and the three Manchester friends decided they could – and would – do it better. They could not let their employers, the Commercial Cable Company know what they were doing or they would be fired, No outside employment was allowed. That ruled out calling it the John Moores Football Pool or anything like it. Moores recalled years later: "Calling it the John Smith's football pool sounded a bit dodgy", the solution to that particular problem came from Colin Askham, He had been orphaned as a baby and been brought up by an aunt whose surname was Askham, but he had been born Colin Henry Littlewood And so, in 1923, the Littlewood Football Pool – as it was called originally – was started. Each of the three partners invested £50 of their own money into the venture and with the help of a small discreet and cheap printer they got to work. In 1923, £50 was a huge sum to invest in what – based on Barnard's experience – was a precarious venture and as Moores himself remembered: "As I signed my own cheque at the bank, my hands were damp, it seemed such a lot of money to be risking". A small office in Church Street, Liverpool, was rented and the first 4,000 coupons were distributed outside Manchester United's Old Trafford ground before one Saturday match that winter, Moores handed the coupons out himself, helped by some young boys eager to earn a few pennies. It was not an instant success & only 35 coupons came back & Bets totalled £4 7s 6d and the 10 per cent deducted did not even cover the three men’s expenses, they needed to take the idea to another level and quickly. So they decided to print 10,000 coupons and took them to Hull, where they were handed out before a big game, this time, only one coupon was returned. Their venture was about to collapse almost as soon as it had begun. In the canteen of the Commercial Cable Company the three partners had a hushed conversation, It was a crisis meeting. They had kept pumping money into the fledgling business but midway through the 1924-25 football season it was still losing money. The three young men were each £200 lighter in the pocket with no prospect of things improving. Bill Hughes suggested they cut their losses and forget the whole thing, Colin Askham agreed. They could see why John Jervis Barnard's idea of a football pool had failed in Birmingham, they expected Moores to concur but instead he said: "I'll pay each of you the £200 you've invested, if you'll sell me your shares", Moores admitted that he considered giving up on the business himself but was encouraged by his wife who told him "I would rather be married to a man who is haunted by failure rather than one haunted by regret". Moores kept faith and he paid Askham and Hughes £200 each. In 1928 Moores' younger brother Cecil devised a security system to prevent cheating, eventually the pools took off & become one of the best-known names in Britain. In January 1932, Moores by now a millionaire & was able to disengage himself sufficiently from the pools to start up Littlewoods Mail Order Store. This was followed on 6 July 1937 by the opening of the first Littlewoods department store in Blackpool. By the time World War II started there were 25 Littlewoods stores across the UK and over 50 by 1952. Later years Moores retired as chairman in October 1977 of Littlewoods and was succeeded by his son Peter, however, as profits fell (Moores remained on the board) he resumed the chairmanship in October 1980. He gave up this role again in May 1982 and was made life president of the organisation even though Moores remained involved until 1986. His family carried on running Littlewoods but John Clement succeeded Moores as chairman, Moore had two operations straight after each other on his achilles tendon and then for an enlarged prostate during the summer of 1986 but he never was quite the same again. At the 1987 League Cup final sponsored by Littlewoods, Moores was the guest of honour. In early 1988, by now mainly in a wheelchair, he was still visiting Littlewoods stores across the UK but he began to lose his speech shortly afterwards and gave that role up., Moores attended Everton football matches up to a few years before his death. On 25 September 1993, Sir John died at his home "Fairways" at Shireburn Road, Freshfield, Formby, where he had lived since 1930. He was cremated six days later at Southport. Two months after his death his estate was valued as being worth more than 10 million pounds. The Littlewoods businesses were sold to the Barclay Brothers nine years later in October 2002. More Pictures here.. http://www.flickr.com/photos/59183113@N05/sets/72157627501865884/ Thanks
  24. Jimmy has done a history somewhere, and in the style of most lazy explorers, you can find it there. This is a massive white Art Deco building that sits a few miles from the city centre, and has laid derelict for a good number of years. There is a proposal to redevelop it, but I think that is on hold. Like most things. So a white edifice is sitting in surprisingly good condition. Interiors A view from the Tower... Top fucking day, thanks to Jimmy (WIMR) for a top day
  25. Hi all A friend recommended this forum to me so I decided to give it a look and liked what I have seen. So just a quick hello from me.

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×