Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'RAF'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 81 results

  1. This Avro Shackleton is one of three aircrafts situated at Long Marston. After the small aviation museum had sadly closed its doors, the Shackleton MR3, serial number WR985, was among a group of larger airframes that were not relocated, and is still sat at the old World War 2 airfield today. With plans to tear up the old runways (one of which had been latterly used as a dragstrip) and build thousands of new homes on the site, the future prospects of the decommissioned Shackleton seem bleak. WR985 first flew in 1958 and was later relegated to ground training duties under the maintenance serial 8103M. It was disposed of in 1988 and moved to Long Marston airfield. Also there's the Percival Sea Prince T.1 ex WM735 (ex G-RACA) ex Staverton, on display at the airfield entrance. And finally a Gloster Meteor T.7 WL332 ex Cradiff. More Pictures from the explore... Come along on the explore and check out the video i made. If you enjoyed Videos like this be sure to SUBSCRIBE to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/rosswallaceadventures
  2. RAF Church Fenton The Explore 'Twas a nice easy mooch from about a year ago with @Urbexbandoned. Because I'm so far behind in posting reports I always have to go back and read Tracey's report to jog my memory so I can write some shite here as an intro. I can remember it was a boiling hot day and the pollen levels were reading at about 4 billion parts per square metre. After hacking through a shitload of undergrowth for a good half an hour we eventually found something which resembled an RAF base. I was only a few more sneezes away from death. The jungle made it difficult to navigate around and I remember thinking at the time to make sure I returned during the winter so we could actually see where we were going, but I haven't returned since. I bunged my photo's onto my hard drive back then and only just had a look again recently, and to be honest I was pretty disappointed as they're all a bit samey. Derpy barrack blocks and a JR's mess, blah blah peely blah.. the Upwood of the future.. The History First opened in 1937, RAF Church Fenton is the former home of the first American Eagle Squadrons and was formally regarded as one of the UK's most important strategic airfields, offering rapid reaction fighter defence to the industrial cities of Sheffield, Bradford and Leeds during the second World War. Now, after decades of faithful service in defence of the realm, the air station stands as a lonely hostage to both time and decay. On 1 April 1937 the station was declared open and on 19 April the first station commander Wing Commander W.E. Swann assumed command. Within two months, No. 71 Squadron RAF had arrived with their Gloster Gladiators. During September 1940 Church Fenton became home to the first "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers - No. 71 Squadron RAF and their Brewster Buffalos and Hawker Hurricanes. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, No. 242 Squadron RAF and No. 306 Squadron RAF respectively. As air warfare became a more tactical and technological pursuit, the first night-fighter Operational Training Unit was formed at Church Fenton in 1940 and some of the squadrons stationed there began to fly the famous de Havilland Mosquito. After the close of the war, the station retained its role as a fighter base, being among the first to receive modern jet aircraft, namely the Gloster Meteor and the Hawker Hunter. In later years, Church Fenton became the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of 2013 and By 19 December, all units had been relocated and the airfield was closed. Some equipment was be relocated to RAF Topcliffe and MoD security continued to secure the site until disposal. A NOTAM was issued suspending the air traffic zone at the end of 2013. The Pictures 1. 2. 3/4. 5. 6/7. 8. 9/10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  3. History Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. The Explore Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits. The Pictures I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. Thanks for looking. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  4. UK RAF Church Fenton

    Explored with @CuriousityKilledTheCat , @TheVampiricSquid , @Redhunter and a n0n OS member... After driving around for about half an hour, ending up in completely the wrong place, getting eaten alive by mozzies, we'd finally managed to find the correct place ( 2 seconds away from where we were ) Loved exploring this place, although there wasnt much left in what i assume was the Accommodation blocks, the natural decay made for some pretty awesome shots! unfortunately the basement was completely flooded so we couldn't get any shots in there. History! (courtesy of wiki) Opened in 1937, it saw the peak of its activity during the years of the Second World War, when it served within the defence network of fighter bases of the RAF providing protection for the Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and Humberside industrial regions. During September 1940 it became home to the first RAF "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers being No. 71 Squadron RAF initially with the Brewster Buffalo I for one month before changing to the Hawker Hurricane I. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, with No. 242 Squadron RAF for the Canadians and No. 306 Squadron RAF for the Polish Enjoy! Cheers for looking
  5. RAE Bedford 8x8, 3x3 Windtunnels and RAF Thurleigh Tower - Apr/Dec 15 The Explores The first visit was intended to be a quick recce as there had been nothing from the place for a few years, so naturally assumed it was sealed tight... but bloody hell are we glad we checked the place out! Explored with @Session9 and @The Lone Shadow over 2 days last April and accessed the 8x8 tunnel building and the ATC tower at Thurleigh the next day. The 8x8 building complex itself it situated within a live industrial area complete with active security driving/walking around and people/cars generally coming and going constantly. Even the main test area had live offices at one end with PIR’s covering that part stopping me from getting to the bottom of the massive ladders that led to the roof. I found out months later that these were inactive, twat. Various companies have warehouses or office space pretty much encircling the target building so access was lets just say a little tricky! At one point we squeezed and shuffled through pigeon shit and wheelie bins only to find it eventually led back outside again much to our amusement. A bit of perseverance and we were in. The History The origins of RAE Bedford date back to 1944, and Aeronautical Research Committee Report No. ARC 7500 which recommended the setting up of a National Establishment for aeronautical research and development. The Government, in accepting the report, decided to set up the Establishment at Bedford. The NAE became the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Bedford in 1955 1. Authority to proceed with the construction of the 8x8 Tunnel was given in 1949 and it achieved its first run in 1955. Capable of operation at subsonic speeds and at supersonic speeds from a Mach number of 1.3 to 2.5, the air was driven by a 12-foot diameter, ten-stage axial compressor powered from an 80,000hp [60 Megawatts] electrical source. The advanced aerodynamic capability and quality of the tunnel was such that it was extensively used over a period of forty-six years and served many overseas customers, both military and civil, as well as meeting the British need. Finally surplus to requirements in 2002, its 10,000 tons of steel have hopefully been usefully recycled. All that remains today is he empty infrastructure that contained the tunnel and compressor.... Aerial stock image of the now 'Twinwoods' site.. 2. 3. The first control room we were excited to stumble across, a series of blinded viewing windows allowed personnel to monitor the main compressor hall. Hadn't a wide angle lens then so only a couple of iPhone pano's really and i wish i'd spent a bit more time photographing this bit.. 4. 5. 6. So, i took a wander down the hallway and came across a load of empty bland offices on the left and some interesting bits on the right.. 7. Supply area.. 8. 9. Further down the corridor (which myself and @Urbexbandoned found sealed on a visit months later) I got excited when i read this sign.. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Moving on from the main site lies the old RAF Thurleigh ATC tower. The Airfield is now packed full of vehicles, new and old, some of the older ones victims of the scrappage scheme but i wasn't hugely interested in these and we headed towards the tower itself via a few other barrack shaped buildings and a wooden radar pylon... 15. These didn't look worth the effort... 16. The tower... Jumping back to Apr 15…we decided to take a look at the ATC tower which was basically situated on the same site but on the other side of the massive multi-runway airfield. A long walk past some smelly sheep and a few dives into the bushes thanks to some farmer spreading equally smelly shit around the neighbouring field, eventually we were at the tower. On first inspection the place looked like it had been recently sealed with nice fresh looking boards all around but with a bit of head/ball scratching and a leap of faith from The Lone Shadow, myself and Session9 were in… We didn’t bother with zillion cars parked on the runways as there were transporters and humans in hi-viz kicking around most of the time.. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Fast forward to November 2015, Myself and @Urbexbandoned returned once again to check out the 3x3 Tunnel building.. 23. 24. 25/26. 27. 28. 29. 30. The 3x3' Control Room.. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated : )
  6. UK RAF Upwood, Sept 2015

    1000 mile Mega Xplore Cannon Brewery while in Sheffield, but decided against it due to access and time. It was lucky as we got stuck in traffic on the way down and only just got here in time for sunset. Again another place with needs no introduction and another type of place I like with all the graffiti and the two tanks make it for me. From here we headed somewhere quite and get our heads down for the night (But not until after going to the local chip shop ) https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/albums/72157659274332585
  7. RAF Nocton The Explore Had a quick look one day to show Urbexbandoned the nice peely corridors. I’ve been about 6 times now so only took a few snaps. Got the shot i wanted which was an aerial one from the top of one of the tower things. Nice relaxed wander The History Nocton Hall was acquired by the Air Ministry in 1940 and turned into an RAF Hospital. The Hall itself was used as a "clearing station" until 1943. In 1943 the Americans took possession of the Hall and grounds for a second time. Nocton became home for the United States Army Seventh General Hospital and the Hall was used as the Officers Club. At the end of the War in 1945 the RAF selected Nocton Hall to be their permanent hospital for the county of Lincolnshire. RAF Nocton Hall was a 740 bed hospital under RAF control until 1984, used by civilians and forces personnel, one of the country’s undisputed RAF Hospitals. The decision to close Nocton Hall as a military hospital was taken on 31st March 1983. In its later days 13 American personnel remained to keep the hospital serviceable. RAF Nocton Hall was handed back to Her Majesty's Government by the USAF on 30 September 1995 but has never been brought back into use as a hospital. Various development plans have come and gone and the main hall has acquired grade 2 listed status, who knows what'll happen… The Pictures 1. From the top of the tower.. 2. 3. 4. Phone pano.. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  8. UK RAF Raynham 2015

    For the first time we actually gained access to RAF Raynham, NON permissive. Its a cracking explore and one i will return to at some point as my mum took ill so we had to leave early sadly, anyway it was a warm sunday mid afternoon and we met up with harry and julian, access was fairly easy with various buildings to see. The first building we seen was the airmans restaurant, a lovely sized building with cracking entrance and stunning staircase very much like RAF Upwood. With very minimal decay and damage these buildings have been well preserved, even most windows are intact. A very grand front entrance to the airmans restaurant. Part of the Upper level, there is a lift here for food. The accommodation blocks were failt good with ablutions of a high ranking nature and lovely staircases. Lovely sinks and loos for what looks like high rank serviceman/women Staircase within the accommodation. One of the connecting corridors. The base Headquarters. The corridor. One of the rooms. The server room and telephone exchange within the hq Top of the HQ Views from the top. HQ views - MOD police and sunset at raynham New report and more detailled pics to follow at a later date. Thanks for reading.
  9. UK RAF Upwood - October 2015

    Yep another RAF Upwood post sorry folks! I had ventured around here late last year and easily got booted off by Mr estate car, since then its been active due to that medical facility but sadly not do-able an half collapsed. Anyway after the airsoft players finished in I ventured an spotted another group of people enjoying whatever you can enjoy about this place... The graffiti did not interest me, so kind of focused more on the natural decay here, but thats damn hard in itself with the amount of crappy scribbles... Anyway best part about going in the evening as sunset was approaching, dead quiet I enjoyed the silence... That was until Mr estate car opened the gates and I was off in an out the buildings like a mole. Many know the history. And a pose at the end Cheers for looking
  10. History Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1941 by W & C French Ltd in 1941. On 7th September 1942 the 306th Group started to arrive; with some of their B17s flying in the following week. From October 1942, the 306th Group mounted a long and arduous offensive suffering many losses. The Group finally completed their long war on 19th April 1945 which was their 342nd mission; the second highest for any B17 Group. During its time at Thurleigh over 9,600 sorties had been flown with the loss of 171 aircraft in action and over 22,500 tons of bombs were dropped. In 1946 construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The airfield was finally closed in 1997. (History borrowed from Nelly) The Explore Explored with Session9 and Hamtagger, this was the second site of the day. A long walk into the middle of nowhere - A load of sheep, a farmer cutting grass or crops and a large car graveyard was ahead of us before approaching the control tower area. I recently acquired a pair of mint condition WW2 binoculars and was dying to use them. This was their first explore, and funny enough they came in very handy for checking out the tower for entry points from miles away as well as potential onlookers, security patrols, etc. Upon arrival, it was sealed pretty tight and entry seemed unlikely at first. After a bit of rummaging around amongst a load of unrelated rubbish outside, we used something makeshift along with a leap of faith to shoehorn ourselves inside. Looks like this place has been kept relatively free from youth vandalism, many windows and doors were still intact and the place lacked usual tagging normally found more inner city. Most of the rooms have weathered well over the past 18 years, with algae and moss growing on various parts of the walls. The contrast of green growth, yellow backdrop and a browning rusty texture make well for a point and shoot let alone a crisp DSLR set. Top floor contained all the telecommunications equipment along with remnants of signal flares. 2nd floor from top contained the wall board with all the flight information and included various documents and information, other floors contained geological information and weather reports. Overall, a great and interesting explore. It is very rare to see somewhere that has deteriorated largely through weather and time rather than some little shit throwing bricks through the windows and wrecking the place. Pictures Thanks for viewing The Lone Shadow
  11. This was the first time at RAF Upwood Medical Facilty and it proved a good explore although heavilty trashed. While we had to crawl under a broken piece of plyboard it didnt disapoint with stuff and debris everywhere, plus nearly every piece of glass was broken. As well as it being pitch black and the only source of light was our phone torches it proved fun, we saw a lot of spent needles, gloves, dental aperatus and more. Dental lights and aperatus trashed or broken. Whilst walking around with nothing other than phone torches for light, the smell of recent fire damage from vandals whoever else, we heard foot steps, i told the girls to stay in she shadows and not move until i return, i wandered slowly until the noises got louder and hid behind a door until 2 people ermerged in which i shined my torch, they crapped it and asked if i was police or security or if i was going to harm them, i said no im a explorer and called the girls.... the look on thier face was PRICELESS. Various forms of aperatus has been left behind as well as back up generators and switch boards. The sad reality is these amongst a few other pic taken by others are the VERY last we will see of this lovely place as the diggers have moved in,,, but why??? it was in decent serviceable condition until vandals trashed it! The only facilty now is RAF Alconbury which some of the aperatus has been moved to, whilst it sits more or less disused there. Sadly it now seems there will be room for 300 houses on the Raf Upwood site, and who knows who will occupy them, RAF Upwood was a great explore but sadly the level of decay is too much now. I will personally miss the place. I hope you all enjoy this report and many other to come Lee
  12. Opening in May 1939, Royal Air Force West Raynham was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War. RAF West Raynham was an expansion scheme airfield with a grass landing strip and a Fort-type lookout tower. The lookout tower was replaced with a “Control Tower for Very Heavy Bomber Stations†later in the war. The headquarters and accommodation blocks were built to the west of the landing area and bomb stores to the south-east. In 1943 two concrete runways were built to replace the grass landing strip. One runway was 1.8km and the other 1.3km in length. The housing on the base was also expanded at the same time, providing accommodation for 2,456 men and 658 women. The station had a Rapier missile training dome, in which a 180 degree simulation could be projected onto the inside of the dome to simulate flight in a fighter jet. Many of the facilities were similar to those provided by the stations sister base RAF Kirton in Lindsey in Lincolnshire, including the training dome. The station closed in 1994 but was retained as a strategic resrve. The site laid derelict until the RAF decided it was surplus to requirements in 2006 and was sold to developers in 2007. Part of the site has been used as a new housing estate, and the land around the main runway is now a solar farm. The Airmen's Restaurant Officers Mess Station HQ Accommodation Blocks Medical Block Sports Hall Control Tower Hangers and Rapier Dome The hangers are now in use by private businesses so we didn't go inside them. Water Tower
  13. This was my third visit to Nocton Hall, I was showing someone else the site. This old military hospital is often overlooked, but if you want long corridors, peely paint and decay, this is a great place to go.
  14. RAF Upwood The Explore Visited in the summer time with Urbexbandoned It's knocking on Octobers back door and i'm starting to accumulate a backlog of explores and pictures burning a hole in my computer. I need to learn to stop writing war and peace each time and maybe i'll catch up to Septembers reports by Christmas In the morning of this visit we decided to have a look at the wind tunnel site at bedford and managed to sneak past a film crew and about 50 people dressed in weird costumes depicting arabic writing and symbols that I can only describe as based on ISIS/ISIL/IS. Must've been filming a deep and meaningful play about war and terrorism or something, we didn't really give a fuck, but used the crew entrance that me and Session9 had used as an exit point months before as an opportune entrance point and walked up the stairs past a load of camera equipment and into the control room that overlooks what would have been the 8x8 tunnel hangar. We had a quick selfie in the control room which i later realised turned out dark and blurry and then walked past the camera man on the way out, said hello, and he didn't bat an an eyelid as we strolled past waiting for the "oi" that didn't come. Then we decided to swing by Cardington hangers. First time i'd seen them in the flesh and fuck me, they looked impressive and well into their re-fit. Later that day after visiting some family we headed off to Cambridgeshire for a sniff around Upwood. Nice and leisurely mooch, a few kids knocking about and a few dog walkers. We were just about to climb the tower and Urbexbandoned said she'd go first..... after one rung she looked up only to be greeted by a pigeon cack to the head. When i had finished having a laughter fit we made our way to the top. Great view from up there and a nice way to top off a top day The History (Stolen from Urbexbandoned ) Since 1982, the Nene Valley Gliding Club has conducted its glider operations from a field that occupies the site of the old runways. Initially these operations were under an agreement with the Ministry of Defence. However, in 1995 the club was told they would need to find a new home as the land was going to be sold off. The club was unable to locate a suitable new home and was preparing for the possibility of having to close when the purchaser of the land, Marshal Papworth, agreed to lease the land to the club for 10 years. This has allowed the club to continue flying from Marshals Paddock (so named by the club after their benefactor's death in 2000). Much of the RAF Upwood is unused, closed by the Ministry of Defence in 1994. Most of the station was vacated and the land and buildings sold off to civil ownership. Upwood is also the home of No. 511 (Ramsey) Squadron Air Training Corps who have been on the site since the early 70s. Originally housed in the old fire station the squadron moved to a number of buildings before settling in the old nissen hut church building. When the station was closed by the MOD in 1995, the squadron moved to the Upwood school. The squadron finally settled into the present building inside the fence in 1997. In 2004 Turbine Motor Works purchased a large amount of property on the former base including the four C-type hangars. Their plan is to convert the property into a state-of-the-art jet engine overhaul facility. Together with the Nene Valley Gliding Club and the Air Cadet Squadron, this facility will ensure that the former RAF base will continue its aviation legacy well into the 21st century. Part of the facility is now used by airsoft players. The Pictures 1. Pano from the roof of Pigeon Tower.. 2. 3. Urbexbandoned's Nikon Vs. Cannon 4/5/6. Three pictures that looked wank at normal size 6. 7. 8. Toilet massacre 9. A couple from the barrack blocks, airsofted and graffed to death.. 10. 11. Medical centre which unfortunately had been trashed in such a short time since closure, also pitch black in most areas. (now completely demo'd apparently) 12. I had a nightmare getting a shot in here due to being tripodless but managed to salvage one... As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  15. The History (Borrowed from Wiki) Between the 1960s and 1990s, the Site was the Multi-Occupational Training and Education Centre (MOTEC) which provided training for workers including HGV drivers and mechanics and hosted the RTITB National Junior Mechanic Competition 1987. The majority of the runways have been removed leaving only small tracks however nine hangars still are present spread out over the site and near a local village. A local Wartime Aircraft Recovery Group also occupies a section of the site. In 2002 it was proposed to build a centre for asylum seekers on the site. The site was sold in 2014 to the Greenhous Group. The Visit after an early start with hangover from my moms wedding the night before we set off me, Loocyloo and Redhunter. So after a very long walk around the 5ft high corn field! and the slippery entrance we were over my fluffy socks soaked... well everything was soaked! So first we headed for the water tower! after LoocyLoo knocking rust into my eyes off the ladder! we made it to the top and as we got to the top a car pulled up with a rather wide gentleman with a little white westie after waiting it out we realised he wasn't leaving! So we made our way down to carry on, after a few close misses he was close to catching us! thanks to the little hide outs we made our way to the storage location for the BEDFORD! the main reason for our visit and after spending 5/6 hours we got caught by a eastern european lad that looked about 15... he didn't actually ask us to leave he just kept hinting that he wanted us togo. He was timid to if you bump into him be nice... anywhore enjoy! Abit of info about the bedford!
  16. UK RAF Upwood, September 2015

    Great explore this and has been on the list for quite some time now, only being an hour or so away. Unfortunately we did not manage to enter the hospital section as it is now half demolished and appeared to have somewhat eagle eyed secca watching over it and the rumors I had heard of the aircraft hangars recently being vacated are not confirmed as we could not find an access point. While exploring it became a little film set explore venture after watching The Devils Chair the night before which was recorded at RAF Upwood under the fictional name of Blackwater Asylum. Never making a big screen film, its well worth a watch.. There is plenty of other reports with the history on this place so I will leave that bit out.
  17. UK RAF Upwood - September 2015

    The Flight of Project Brown Eye A miracle happened: My friend was done smashing rocks at his 50 hour a week day job and wanted to come out for a splore! I was up for it, but my only condition was he would have to drive Haha! Our first target was another military site in our area, but we were swiftly mugged off by a Securitas pick up truck and we went on our merry way, travelling further North. Our next target was Upwood. We had no idea how access was going to be or what would be left, but we just went for it anyway... As we got there we soon realised that the medical centre was being torn down as we spoke. We bumped into other Urbexers who said it had been going on all week, so I suppose within about a week or two of this thread it'll be torn down completely. Lots of little orange dudes were milling about the site so I took this shot at a distance. The remaining buildings are pretty 'bleh', but they're worth a mooch. I won't bore you all with too many pictures of them, because they're much the same. Was interesting trying to figure out what some of them were for though, particularly the semi-buried bunker type buildings. The centre pieces of this site have to be the tanks though. They're Russian PT-76 light tanks, which are 1950s era and amphibious. There's two on site in total. My hopes are that someone will have them and love them, rather than scrapping them. I snapped this rather dashing shot or Mr.Pb on the second one... Innards of the turrets. The armour is actually very thin - maybe about 1" on the weaker spots. Not to mention they're cramped as hell for a lanky git like me and there's plenty of sticky outy bits to bash my fat melon on. I sure as crap wouldn't want to be inside one during a war Pb drops into the drivers hatch. Looks like someone might have swept up in here or something. BBs litter to place EVERYWHERE from the airsoft donuts that plague this derp. We walked past them a few times but they were too focused on talking about their gear to notice us The toilets and shower rooms are in bad nick. Very smashed up. Shower room door. The chimney tower ladder. I would have climbed it, but it was full of pigeons n stank like their "peeps 'n' poops". Group shot on the tank! Video to go with it, looking at the tanks and bumping into various different people. Towards the end we manage to get "Project Brown Eye" a.k.a Bill's Nan's car in for an Urbex drive by, with hilarious results: So to conclude, I think if you haven't already had a mooch here, have a look now because it's going quick! The med centre is gone, so whether or not you still want to go if you're coming from a long way is up to you. I had a great day meeting all sorts of different people and walking around in the sun, despite breaking my GoPro. This place is the busiest Urbex site I've ever been to. Urbexers, photographers, Airsoft mugs and local land owners...I think half the county have been here at some point or the other! Cheers to Pb for driving! Thanks for looking.
  18. This was another of those fab days out, Just driving around and checking out stuff I had been wanting to see for a while that had popped up online. So myself Zyge, littlebear and Spark headed out for the day to avoid massive nettles and horsefly bites..... Something that I did not manage all to well 1st stop was a area called Hillbilly farm, this was linked to RAF Fersfield and the land incorporates some of the old nissen huts and a few other out buildings as well. Inside some of these buildings you will see there are all sorts of vehicles and other bits of junk, most of what nature has now reclaimed. There is not a lot of history on the farm itself other than the farmer did not want to sell it off as he was worried about being ripped of, how true this is I am not sure, but the airfield history I feel is important as most of what there is to see incorporates the building that are there. The runway is now gone as are all airfield building that we looked for, but you can still drive around the taxi way if you wish Built in 1943/1944, the airfield was originally a satellite of RAF Knettishall. It was constructed to Class A bomber specifications, with a main 6,000 ft (1,800 m) runway (08/26), and two secondary runways (02/20, 14/32) of 4,200 ft (1,300 m). Accommodation for about 2,000 personnel were in Nissen huts along with an operations block and two T-2 hangars. The facility was originally named Winfarthing when it was allocated to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. Assigned to the VIII Bomber Command, it was renamed Fersfield when used by the Americans. Winfarthing was assigned USAAF station number 140; Fersfield was reassigned 554. Not used by the USAAF, it was transferred to the United States Navy for operational use. The airfield is most notable as the operational airfield for Operation Aphrodite, a secret plan for remote controlled Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (redesignated as BQ-7s) to be used against German V-1 flying bomb sites, submarine pens, or deep fortifications that had resisted conventional bombing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  19. UK RAF Upwood - Cambridge - July 2015

    A bit of history that for once I did NOT steal ..... well from anyone on here History Since 1982, the Nene Valley Gliding Club [1] has conducted its glider operations from a field that occupies the site of the old runways. Initially these operations were under an agreement with the Ministry of Defence. However, in 1995 the club was told they would need to find a new home as the land was going to be sold off. The club was unable to locate a suitable new home and was preparing for the possibility of having to close when the purchaser of the land, Marshal Papworth, agreed to lease the land to the club for 10 years. This has allowed the club to continue flying from Marshals Paddock (so named by the club after their benefactor's death in 2000). Much of the RAF Upwood is unused, closed by the Ministry of Defence in 1994. Most of the station was vacated and the land and buildings sold off to civil ownership. Upwood is also the home of No. 511 (Ramsey) Squadron Air Training Corps who have been on the site since the early 70s. Originally housed in the old fire station the squadron moved to a number of buildings before settling in the old nissen hut church building. When the station was closed by the MOD in 1995, the squadron moved to the Upwood school. The squadron finally settled into the present building inside the fence in 1997. In 2004 Turbine Motor Works purchased a large amount of property on the former base including the four C-type hangars. Their plan is to convert the property into a state-of-the-art jet engine overhaul facility. Together with the Nene Valley Gliding Club and the Air Cadet Squadron, this facility will ensure that the former RAF base will continue its aviation legacy well into the 21st century. Part of the facility is now used by paintballing players. The explore Visited with my better half, Hamtagger After quite a nice day mooching about we rocked up to Upwood in the early evening, it was a beautiful day. The sun was still beating and it must have been half 7!! Got in and soon found out it was going to be a very leisurely explore. We scaled up the many buildings and started making our way around the site. A lot bigger than I expected to be honest. I did expect the level of trashing though as I had seen in various other reports. We made our way to the medical centre as had seen those lamps, considering I'd seen reports from January this year not looking too bad I was shocked at just how trashed it was. Never mind, it made for a few decent pics. We left there and headed for the tower to get some pics from above.. Now I am not usually one for climbing but I was all game for this, was even ready to go first. Didn't even have time to get the gloves out to climb the ladder, I was on it! With HT still clambering to get his gloves on I started climbing.. one step, one fucking step was all I took when I looked up, saw a pigeon and then low and behold the flying rat shit on my forehead!!! I stepped down, HT didn't know what was going on, I just looked at him, pointed to my head and said a pigeon has shit on my head!! Well.... he may as well have been rolling around on the floor in hysterics! Thank god I saw the funny side.. Anyway, I cleaned the pigeon shit off...or so I thought! HT went first this time, with me following.. got all the way to the top and that fucking bird was still flapping around. I knew he was after me so I hastily made my way back down leaving HT up there and he escaped completely bird shit free! I carried on taking pics of some of the buildings and when HT came back down we carried on, laughing about pigeons. Done quite a lot of the site, there is a beautiful state of decay in this place. he buildings looks shit from the exterior but the insides have some real peely goodness. We finished up and walked back to the car.. walking along, HT kept saying he could smell shit, thinking it was dog shit we carried on and it wasn't until he leant in to kiss me he could smell the pigeon shit! I just started laughing, with me and him standing in this quiet little cul de sac with him pouring water over me to get rid of the smell it was the end to a good day Anyway on with the pics 1 - The start of the explore.... someone's excited.... 2 3 - kid in a sweet shop.... 4 5 6 - Those lamps, with neither of us taking a tripod it was the best I got.. 7 8 9 - Peely porn 10 11 - One for us... 12 13 14 15 - Think the electricity has gone.. 16 - He likes to get naked... this is the 'before' shot... 17 18 - Pigeon Shit tower.. 19
  20. Explored with Raz & 2 non members (i think) Background Royal Air Force Station Folkingham or RAF Folkingham is a former Royal Air Force station located south west of Folkingham, Lincolnshire and about 29 miles (47 km) due south of county town Lincoln and 112 miles (180 km) north of London, England. Opened in 1940, it was used by both the Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Forces. During the war it was used primarily as a troop carrier airfield for airborne units and as a subsidiary training depot of the newly formed Royal Air Force Regiment. After the war it was placed on care and maintenance during 1947 when the RAF Regiment relocated to RAF Catterick. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the RAF Bomber Command used Folkingham as a PGM-17 Thor Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) base. Today the remains of the airfield are located on private property being used as agricultural fields, with the main north-south runway acting as hardstanding for hundreds of scrapped vehicles. Went early one february morning for a look around and with the ice melting and sun rising we found this little gem, Bedford fire trucks and all sorts, Love it!! Half hour in a jeep and a van came flying onto site and we took shelter behind a 360 degree tipper. Found us and the conversation went a little like this; Imagine Farmer in a heavy Lincolnshire farmers accent Farmer -"Who are you? What are you doing here?" Us - "We are photographers, taking photos of these vehicles" Farmer - "So why the fuck didn't you ask?!?! How would you like it if i came into your back garden and started taking photos of your things" Us - "We didnt think anyone owned it" Farmer - "Oh yeah, because there is any land in the whole of england that isn't owned" Us - "Sorry" Farmer - "No, i can tell your nice lads but why the fuck didn't you ask?" This went on for a while longer and he then eventually told us to "Fuck off cause ive called the plod" Need to revisit Quite gutted i missed out on the amphibious vehicles, i was hopping to get inside a "Stolly" If you got this far, thanks for looking
  21. My visit This was right on my doorstep, and I was a little bit curious, the perfect opportunity came around to visit, a Vulcan fly by! The XH558 ( (the last airworthy Avro Vulcan) was flying right over the location after looking at the route map! Off I went to get a good view and it just soo happened the roof of this control tower was the perfect place!! The place really is trashed, but it has been sitting around for 70+ years, still an enjoyable walk around, it is located right next door to HMP Mount, and is actually located on HM Prison service land, so I was a bit wary about walking around with a DSLR and zoom lens for the Vulcan, but was left alone which was nice. I also found out later that day that someone had attempted to fly a drone over the prison and drop some drugs in the yard, so I really was lucky not to encounter the prison guards or the police. History Royal Air Force Bovingdon or more simply RAF Bovingdon is a former Royal Air Force station located 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire and 2.5 miles (4.0 km) southeast of Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England. During the Second World War, the airfield was used by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) Eighth Air Force. It was assigned USAAF designation Station 112, station code "BV", later changed to "BZ". Vulcan XH558 Fly By Looked at the time, the Vulcan was due, headed up to roof and sat there waiting for it, all of a sudden out of nowhere I saw this triangular shape heading towards me at speed, started snapping away, well the noise was amazing and as it flew past you could feel it as well. Absolutely fantastic seeing this plane for perhaps the last time in the air, certainly something magical about sitting on a roof of an old WWII Control Tower and seeing a Vulcan fly a few feet above you! Loved it!! Thanks for looking!
  22. UK RAF Driffield 2015

    History; Ripped from wiki (Naughty) Explored with a non member; Carla The first aerodrome to occupy the site was made up of wooden and brick buildings, similar to those found at Duxford or Hendon. Known as Eastburn, No.21 Training Depot was the first unit to occupy the site from 15 July 1918, joined later by Nos. 202 and 217 Squadrons from March 1919. However, by early 1920, these units had disbanded, leaving a deserted airfield, which was removed some years later. During the early 1930s, Driffield was selected for one of the RAF's expansion scheme aerodromes, with construction work beginning in 1935. This new airfield consisted of five large aircraft hangars, curved round the grass runways that stretched towards the north-west. Placed neatly behind these hangars were the many buildings that made up the camp. Opened in July 1936, RAF Driffield became home to a number of bomber squadrons. By 1938, these had been replaced by No.77 and No.102 Squadrons, and were eventually equipped with the twin-engined Armstrong Whitworth Whitley bomber. Second World War Crews of both No.77 and No.102 Squadrons endured a series of training courses and exercises, so that on the outbreak of war, Driffield was ready for action. The morning of 4 September brought great activity to RAF Driffield. Three aircraft from No.102 Squadron were to drop leaflets during that second night of the war. The fuselages of these bombers were crammed with large parcels of propaganda leaflets, wrapped in brown paper. Access that was normally difficult because of the retracted ventral gun turret, was now extremely challenging through the narrow gaps, between the parcels on either side of the turret. Flying at 15,000 ft, the three aircraft crossed the enemy coastline and maintaining strict radio silence, flew down the Ruhr Valley and into France, releasing their load of leaflets, which were dropped through the aircraft's flare chute. The following night of 5 September, No.77 Squadron was given its opportunity to drop leaflets, when two aircraft repeated the operation. On 15–16 March 1940, two aircraft of No.77 Squadron alone dropped 6,000,000 leaflets during a raid over Warsaw; a mission successfully accomplished, despite difficulties encountered with navigation and atrocious weather conditions. This was followed on 19 March by the first deliberate bombing on German soil, when Whitley aircraft from both Driffield squadrons joined those from RAF Dishforth, who together bombed the mine-laying seaplane base at Hornum on the Island of Sylt. On Thursday, 15 August 1940 there was a German air raid on the airfield. At approximately midday, some 50 Junkers Ju 88 bomber aircraft attacked the aerodrome, killing 13 military personnel and 1 civilian, and destroying 12 Whitley aircraft. The 169 bombs dropped caused extensive damage, with many buildings, including all five hangars, being either damaged or destroyed. Weeks later, the surviving aircraft from both Whitley squadrons departed, leaving Driffield to repair the damage, which remained non-operational until early 1941. With repairs to the airfield complete, Driffield saw a new role in the early months of 1941, as fighters replaced bombers, when No.13 Group Fighter Command took control of the airfield. Equipped with Spitfires and Hurricanes, the three squadrons located at Driffield patrolled the North Sea. April 1941 saw the return of No.4 Group Bomber Command and the formation of two new squadrons, both equipped with the Wellington twin-engined bomber. No.104 Squadron and No.405 Squadron RCAF (the first Royal Canadian Air Force bomber squadron formed) commenced bombing operations against Germany. 9 May 1941 saw the first operation by No.104 Squadron, when six Wellington aircraft were despatched to bomb Bremen. One aircraft failed to reach Germany and returned to Driffield with a jammed rear gun turret. Flying at 16,000 ft, four aircraft managed to release their bombs over Bremen, but were unable to see the results, due to the bright glowing haze of the already burning city. One other aircraft failed to reach the target due to intercom failure, but was able to bomb the secondary target of Wilhelmshaven. Despite both targets being heavily defended, all aircraft and crews returned safely. Other Wellington squadrons posted Driffield during the war were No.158 Squadron, No.466 Squadron RAAF (Royal Australian Air Force) and No.196 Squadron. In 1943, RAF Driffield was temporary closed for the construction of three concrete runways, the longest stretching 6,000 ft, linked by a perimeter track, along the length of which were situated the aircraft dispersals and bomb dump.[5] The airfield became operational again in June 1944 with the return of No.466 Squadron RAAF, now equipped with the heavy four-engined Handley Page Halifax bomber. This unit began operations supporting the Allied invasion of Europe by bombing targets in the Normandy area. 12 August 1944 saw the formation of No.462 Squadron, a second Australian unit. During the months that followed, both squadrons joined forces to hit targets across Europe. On 10 September 1944, a small force of some 69 bombers, including 30 from Driffield, targeted the German occupied garrison and coastal defence battery at Le Havre.[6] This was immediately followed by a much larger force of some 930 aircraft, which dropped 47,000 tons of bombs. The following day, the raid was repeated when 22 aircraft from Driffield, combined with a total of 218 from Bomber Command, again attacked the target. Ten hours later, the German garrison surrendered to allied ground forces. In December 1944, No.462 Squadron moved to Norfolk, leaving No. 466 Squadron to fight on from Driffield. The Australians carried out their final raid of the war on 25 April 1945, when a force of 18 aircraft bombed gun emplacements on the island of Wangerooge. After the Second World War After the war, Driffield became home to a number of training establishments. The first, No. 10 Air Navigation School, flew from 1946, equipped with Avro Anson, twin-engined aircraft, which were employed to fly student navigators on short three-hour flights. The unit's Wellington aircraft, endured flights of up to six hours, flying sometimes at night, down to the Channel Islands, along the English Channel and up the North Sea to Scotland. Replaced in 1948 by No. 204 Advanced Flying School, this unit taught pilots how to fly the fast twin-engined de Havilland Mosquito fighter/bomber, an aircraft built entirely out of wood. In 1949, the jet age reached Yorkshire, when No.203 Advanced Flying School formed at Driffield – replacing the Mosquitoes, which departed with their parent unit. This new school would be the first in the world responsible for teaching a new breed of pilot how to fly fast jet aircraft. There were two sections within the school: No.1 Squadron operated the Gloster Meteor – Britain’s first operational jet fighter, while No.2 Squadron flew the de Havilland Vampire. Before climbing into the cockpit, students underwent four weeks of ground training, learning about jet engines, airframes and the different flying techniques associated with the new and much faster aircraft. This was followed by actual flight training, when pilots were taught basic manoeuvres, aerobatics, formation flying, instrument flying and navigation. Renamed No.8 Flying Training School in June 1954, the unit continued at Driffield before moving to Lincolnshire in July 1955. That September, RAF Driffield reverted to the role of a fighter station, when No.13 Group Fighter Command again took control of the airfield. During this period, Nos. 219 and 33 Squadrons, equipped with the de Havilland Venom night fighter, occupied the airfield until June/July 1957, when both units were disbanded. The following October saw the arrival of the Fighter Weapons School from RAF Leconfield, a unit equipped with a variety of jet aircraft, which itself departed in March 1958. In 1957 the British Government announced that the RAF would deploy 60 nuclear intermediate range ballistic missiles. From November 1958 Driffield would be home to No.98 Squadron, which was equipped with three Douglas Thor missiles, each with a range of 1,750 miles and capable of reaching Moscow. With the length of 60 ft, these missiles were stored horizontally on the ground and were erected only when ready for firing or during training exercises. Although the missiles were British owned, the nuclear warheads were still under American ownership. Accordingly, the United States Air Force maintained a sizeable presence at Driffield. In good bureaucratic fashion, the RAF Launch Officer was expected to sign for the warhead after it had been launched, because technically it was then under British control. The missiles at Driffield were never used and the system was dismantled in 1963. During the late 1960s, Blackburn Buccaneer naval aircraft were flight tested at Driffield, and in the early 1970s, gliders of No.642 Volunteer Gliding School also occupied the airfield, albeit briefly, while RAF Linton on Ouse had its main runway resurfaced. Sadly, there were to be no more happy landings, and in 1977, the airfield and camp were taken over by the British Army, who renamed it Alamein Barracks. By the early 1980s, the runways were removed and the hardcore used in the construction of the Driffield bypass. The control tower and air-raid shelters disappeared, while the hangars that protected aircraft for many years were converted to protect Government surplus grain from the elements. Current use The army used Driffield as a driver training centre, until RAF Leconfield (which was also taken over by the Army in 1977) was enlarged to accommodate those who lived and trained at Driffield. In 1992, the RAF regained ownership of this historic aerodrome, naming it: RAF Staxton Wold – Driffield Site. Once again, the RAF ensign flew over Driffield, but not for long. In 1996, the RAF itself transferred its own personnel and facilities to RAF Staxton Wold, thus bringing an end to 60 years of service. On 28 June 1996, the RAF ensign was lowered for the last time, bringing to an end RAF Driffield. It is used as a CTC (cadet training centre) for army cadets and houses 873 Driffield Squadron air training corps. The site has since been used as a driver training area by DST Leconfield. The Explore; As you can see from the photos this place is totally wrecked. Once a fully functuioning and strategically important RAF base, it now stands almost unrecognisable due to decay and vandalism. All 4 hangars are now used for some kind of Transport/storage company so are out of bounds. Nice walk around with Carla, met a couple of guys camping there who were just as surprised to see us as we were to see them. When we explained what we were doing they seemed very interested and decided they were going to explore the old buildings there too! Few more photos; If you got this far, thanks for looking
  23. UK RAF stenigot June 2015

    All am going to say about the dishes, is don't walk up them if u want to fall back down! slippery as fuck! ha! The history, RAF Stenigot was a Second World War radar station situated at Stenigot, near Donington on Bain, Lincolnshire. It was part of the Chain Home radar network, intended to provide long range early warning for raids from Luftflotte V and the northern elements of Luftflotte II along the approaches to Sheffield and Nottingham and the central midlands.[1] After the Second World War, the site was retained as part of the Chain Home network. In 1959 it was upgraded to a communications relay site as part of the ACE High program, which involved adding four tropospheric scatter dishes.[2] The site was decommissioned in the late 1980s and was mostly demolished by 1996. The radar tower is a Grade II listed structure and is now used by the RAF Aerial Erector School for selection tests for possible recruits. There is a Memorial at the top to a former RAF Aerial Erector. Now with the pictures... Now some black and white shots, Thanks for looking guys!
  24. RAF Stenigot Home Radar Station The Explore I’ve lived in and around the Lincolnshire area now for a good few years and always fancied taking a look at these massive dishes but they always seemed to be on the backup list if all the other backups failed. A friend had just received his shiny new 6D in the post and was eager to get out and have a go at some night-time star trail shots and we decided that the isolated, non-light polluted Stenigot site would be perfect for this. So last Friday night, instead of heading into town to drink Jager-bombs till our eyes bled in the hope of later finger-blasting some Uni students, we went to Morrisons instead to buy some sausage rolls and monster for the short drive to Stenigot. After completing the Lincolnshire Rally stage we carefully selected our parking space in the middle of a field The History (robbed) RAF Stenigot was opened in 1940 as an east coast Chain Home radar station. Stenigot provided long range early warning for raids from Luftflotte V and the northern elements of Luftflotte II along the approaches to Sheffield and Nottingham and the central Midlands. After the war, the station remained operational as part of the 'defended area', a line of chain home stations running down the east coast from Flamborough Head in Yorkshire and along the south coast to Portland Bill in Dorset. The equipment and buildings were removed in 1996 although the four parabolic dishes can still be seen lying on the ground close to the old chain home receiver block. All the other buildings connected with Ace High, including the police house have been demolished with only the concrete bases remaining to indicate their former positions. The Pictures 1. 2. At this point I said to my mate, "If there IS a bull we can easily jump up onto the dishes, it'll never be able to get up there".. He then showed me a YouTube clip of a bull jumping about 12 feet into a crowd and killing loads of people.. thanks for that.... 3. The one (originally four) remaining mast used for training by RAF Digby to the right... 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Then it started to get dark.. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Beam me up Scotty.. 15. 16. An edit my mate done with multiple hams, find all 9 if you can As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  25. RAF Thurleigh Air Traffic Control Tower The Explore After a double visit to the RAE Bedford Windtunnel testing site, we decided to take a look at the ATC tower which was basically situated on the same site but on the other side of the massive multi-runway airfield. A long walk past some smelly sheep and a few dives into the bushes thanks to some farmer spreading equally smelly shit around the neighbouring field, eventually we were at the tower. On first inspection the place looked like it had been recently “sealed†with nice fresh looking boards all around but with a bit of head/ball scratching and a leap of faith from The Lone Shadow, myself and Session9 were in Didn’t bother with zillion cars parked on the runways as there were transporters and humans in hi-viz kicking around most of the time.. The History Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1940 by W & C French Ltd. Its first use was by NO.160 SQN RAF, forming on 16 January 1942. Thurleigh was one of 28 fields listed for use by the U.S. Eighth Air Force on 4 June 1942, tentatively designated station B-4, and was allocated on 10 August 1942. With the essential construction completed, the 306th Bombardment Group deployed to Thurleigh on 7 September 1942. The group flew the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress aircraft, and remained at Thurleigh until 1 December 1945. That was the longest tenure of any U.S. air group at a UK base. Starting in 1946, construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The runway was extended in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production. One local road was dropped into a cutting so that it would not sit above the level of the runway. All this airfield activity justified a Control Tower of this size… The Pictures Taken in 1957 (not really, was a few weeks ago ) 2/3. On the long walk to the tower we went past this rickety wooden construction with the bottom of the ladder entwined with thick thorny shit.. 4. Also this collection of buildings which didn't look worth the effort accessing.. 5/6. On to the ATC Tower itself.. 7. Main Tower Control.. 8. 9. 10. 11/12.. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19/20. 21. Central Stairwell 22/23. Lurking in the ladies.. 24. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
×