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Found 6 results

  1. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  2. Went for a mooch about with @-Raz- History; The first shafts at Maltby Main Colliery were sunk in 1910, and the first coal produced four years later. Situated in a wooded area on Tickhill Road the colliery was some distance from the township of Maltby and in order to gain a workforce the colliery company commissioned the building of Maltby Model Village, an estate of 1,000 houses. The colliery was opened by the Maltby Main Colliery Company, a subsidiary of the Sheepbridge Iron and Coal Company.[1]Before nationalisation the owners were given as Amalgamated Denaby Collieries Ltd. An explosion in the pit occurred 28 July 1923, resulting in 27 deaths. The two shafts were deepened in the ten years from 1951 and this allowed horizontal access to the Barnsley seam. This also gave access to a new Swallow Wood seam. By 1969 the Barnsley seam was considered exhausted and production went over to Swallow Wood. In 1981 a major project commenced to mine the Parkgate seam. Costing £180,000,000 the first coal was brought to the surface just one year later. The colliery was mass picketed during the 1984–1985 miners' strike during attempts by contractors to carry out building work at the pit. The colliery was bought by RJB Mining, later renamed UK Coal, in 1994. Silverwood Colliery, the adjacent mine, closed in 1994 but had good reserves which could be worked from Maltby. Uncertainties with contracts, notably with the electricity generators, production was stopped in 1997. The pit recommenced operations and coal was gained from both the Parkgate seam, which is estimated to be exhausted by 2014, and the Silkstone seam, which will extend the life of the pit beyond that date. In 2007 Maltby Colliery was sold by UK Coal to Hargreaves Services plc for £21.5 million, resulting in the continued employment of 500 people. Access to the reserves is gained by two shafts, No.2 984m deep and No.3 991m deep, with the capability of winding up to 1,500 tonnes of mineral an hour to the surface. In May 2012 unusual and dangerous geological conditions (oil, water and gas ingress) were discovered in workings of the T125 block that was to be exploited in 2013, resulting in abandonment of the tailgate for that block, and was expected to cause an gap in production of 1.5 to 3 months. In late 2012 the 540 employees were given redundancies notices, and the pit owner announced it was to mothball the colliery due to dangerous underground conditions. On December 2012 Hargeaves announced that the colliery was to close due to the geological problems... ...Convenient right? The mine was closed in 2013, and most of the above ground structures demolished in 2014 The explore; We arrived and parked miles away which left us with a long walk over what could quite possibly have been the moon? More slag mountains than slag heaps. Avoiding the spinning rather angry cameras we decided to leave the power house till last, as we didn't want to miss the main attraction, so to the Baths we went. We popped our heads into the power house on the way out but decided it wasn't really worth it so it was time to leave or "offskie" as Raz fondly says. Here's the rest of the set; Some real sign porn here... As always, thanks for looking
  3. Quick Intro to myself

    Good Evening Everyone, Just a quick intro to myself, my name is Ben, and im the Photographer at B T Frewin Photography, hence my profile name, and i currently live in Rotherham. I am pretty much new to the whole urbex scene, but have a ton of experience with my camera and love a good explore. Im just reaching out to fellow rotherham/sheffield urban explores/photographers who wouldnt mind meeting oneday to explore new places and exsisting ones and hopefully get me fully into this. If so, drop me a messege. Cheers.
  4. Explored with Rott3nW00d & Raz; So the last report was killing me as there wasn't one single decent photo out of the lot... So we went for a revisit History; Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. The Explore; As mentioned above i have recently posted a report on this location but the photos and quality were dire. So off we went for another look. 1 year had passed since our last visit and if the place was knackered before its even worse now!! floors that were safe last time have collapsed, some of the doors were bearing the full weight of the wall/house above them and if you tried to move quickly anywhere you were pretty likely to be seriously injured if not worse. All the upstairs in now pretty much unaccessable unless you have a death wish so we missed out on one of the best stair cases i've seen All in all this place will soon not need to be knocked down as it will have fallen down of its own accord and if you do go, the swimming pool is the best bit by far Photos; Wrote my page name on this plate on my last visit Spent about 45 mins playing with long exposure at the end - brilliant fun If you got this far, thanks for looking
  5. Hi from Rotherham

    Hello my name's Steve & I'm an alcoh... shit, wrong group. I've long been intrigued by abandoned places when wandering around with my camera, have only recently discovered that if you know the name for it you get a lot shinier class of photos pass your way. Total exploration virgin though
  6. Hiya all... On a few other websites not really done many UXing to be honest only just getting into it as a hobby.. met up with a guy yesterday at a meet from another forum and told me about this place so decided to join (think his name was sam? not 100% sure he had a gotiee) will post a report up in the appropriate places in a bit Im bob and im from sheffield, i go caving, scuba diving, and Uxing SO HELLO
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