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Found 14 results

  1. History The village of Doel is said to date back to 1267. It was originally known as ‘De Doolen’ (‘border water’) and up until the eighteenth century it was essentially an island surrounded by flooded plains. For many years, due to its unusual geographical location, it was unclear which country Doel actually belonged to – whether it was the region controlled by Spain or the independent State of the Netherlands. The design of the village that exists today has been dated back to the Eighty Years War (somewhere between 1568 and 1648) and it remains largely unchanged; it is completely surrounded by old seawalls and has been built according to a checkerboard pattern (the village consists of three streets parallel to the riverfront, four streets perpendicular to those, and all of it criss-crossed with alleys and small corridors). Doel also boasts many historical buildings. Some of these include Belgium’s oldest stone windmill (which is not abandoned), Reynard Farm, the Old Hoefyzer (a farmstead and inn site), and the Baroque Hooghuis that once belonged to the family of seventeenth-century artist, Pieter Paul Rubens. However, despite its obvious historical significance, just before the turn of the millennium the Belgian government announced that Doel was destined to be demolished to make way for the enlargement of the Port of Antwerp. All the residents in the village were offered cash premiums to sell-up voluntarily, and they were encouraged to take up the offer by being told that any refusal would lead to expropriation and the offer of much less money. As a result, by 2007 there were fewer than three-hundred and fifty people left in the village – a reduction from approximately one thousand three-hundred. In an effort to save the village, plans were launched to open the site as an open-air museum, with various famous artists painting murals to deliver the message: ‘Don’t take our village away.’ Nevertheless, other artists were soon attracted to the site and began to use the buildings as canvases for their own work. Now, only a few buildings remain free of graffiti; these are the homes of the last residents in Doel. They are the villagers who have shown resilience against the government and, despite facing attacks by squads of riot police, which has resulted in the streets being strewn with rubble and the start of some of the demolition work, they continue in their effort to save the village and their homes. Even with their efforts, though, these defiant individuals are acutely aware that the gradual deterioration and destruction of the village only strengthens the likelihood that the port will, in the very end, win. The only good news to emerge is that, in response to the imminent outcome, plans have emerged to dismantle and rebuild, brick by brick, some of the historic sites in a neighbouring town. This is to ensure they are preserved for the enjoyment and education of future generations. Our Version of Events On our mission to consume lots of good beer, we left Bruges and set off in the direction of Antwerp. However, just over an hour later we found that we were almost upon the great city. We’d neglected to take into consideration how small Belgium is so we had a bit of spare time to kill before it was time to get pissed all over again. To break up the drinking and sober up a bit, then, we decided to go take a quick look at the [mostly] abandoned village of Doel we’d read about some time ago. Finding the place was easy. We simply drove in the direction of the great big nuclear power plant that towers over everything within its vicinity. What is more, with few residents still living in the village itself, there was no dodging and diving to get onsite. Instead, we simply drove straight into the heart of Doel. It felt very strange to be driving along streets that seemed completely abandoned. There was nothing especially spectacular about the place given that most of the buildings are simply empty shells and homes, but there was still something rather cool about the whole experience. The best bit, of course, was being able to find a parking spot right in the middle of the explore. That never happens! All in all, it didn’t take long to walk around the place. We had a bit of a mooch down every street, and peeked inside a fair few of the buildings. But, as we quickly discovered, there’s very little left inside any of the structures. The only interesting thing we found in one of the houses was a small kitten and around twenty dishes of rotten food. Unfortunately, the cat bolted as soon as we entered the building, so there wasn’t much we could do to try and save it. We didn’t have anything edible on us to lure it back either, only strong Belgian beer. Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26:
  2. Visited as part of the Scotland tour with @Butters & @R0tt3nW00d After spending a little longer than anticipated at Eastend, we decided to skip one of our planned locations and head here instead as geographically speaking it made more sense than heading yet further North at 4 pm. I'm glad we chose to do this as it would appear there is more here than most peopel realise. On arrival it was rather surprising to find that the whole area was saturated with dog walkers, so most unusually we walked straight past the security house and into the heart of the Asylum. 3 times the secca passed us in their pick up and didn't even look twice at us. There is more to be done here, but for now as i can't see me going back in the near future, this will do History; Shamelessly ripped from Wiki with a few minor alterations Bangour Village Hospital was a psychiatric hospital located west of Dechmont in West Lothian, Scotland. It was officially opened in October 1906 (under the name Edinburgh District Asylum), over two years after the first patients were admitted in June 1904. In 1918 Bangour General Hospital was created in the grounds, but the hospital began winding down in 1989 with services being transferred to the newly built St. John's Hospital in the Howden area of Livingston. The final ward at Bangour eventually closed in 2004. The hospital was modelled on the example of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s, at Schkeuditz, Germany, and represents one of the first village-plan psychiatric hospitals in Scotland. The Bangour institution comprised individual villas which would house approximately 30 patients each. The village also incorporated its own railway connection, a farm, bakery, workshops, recreation hall, school, shop, library and, latterly, a multi-denominational church. The hospital was requisitioned by the War Office during both wars when it became the "Edinburgh War Hospital" and "The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital", reverting to a psychiatric hospital between the wars and after 1945. The number of patients rose to over 3,000 in 1918. Temporary marquees and prefabricated huts were erected to cope with the demand for bed space, for both patients and staff. This led to the creation of Bangour General Hospital in the surrounding grounds, which was to become a world leader in many medical fields, in particular its esteemed burns and plastic surgery unit which was established in 1940. It also had a 1st class Maternity Unit serving the whole of the county. In 1989, St John's Hospital opened in nearby Livingston, and services were transferred from Bangour General Hospital, which closed in the early 1990s. The Village Hospital also started to wind down after the opening of St Johns, with the last remaining ward closing in 2004. The hospital site comprises numerous buildings and structures, including 13 category A listed buildings. An architectural competition held in 1898 was won by Hippolyte Blanc. The villas are domestic in character, while the nurse's home is more institutional. The villas were set within landscaped grounds, and are built in a 17th-century Scottish Renaissance style, with numerous individual variations. At the centre of the site is an Edwardian Baroque hall, and a Romanesque style church, which was designed by H. O. Tarbolton and built 1924-1930.[ When the hospital was built, road access was poor, and considerable volumes of coal and general stores were required for the running of the facility. A private railway line was built, branching from the former Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway line at Uphall. It was authorised by the Edinburgh and District Lunacy Board Act of 30 July 1900, and it was opened to passengers on 19 June 1905. It may have been used before that date in connection with construction of the hospital. The North British Railway operated the line, but the Bangour station was considered private. However there was an intermediate station at Dechmont, which was open to the public generally, and was much used by staff at the hospital who lived at Dechmont. During World War I the road network was improved, and the railway became unnecessary; it was closed on 1 August 1921, although passenger services probably ceased on 4 May 1921. The closed hospital was used as a filming location for the 2005 film The Jacket, starring Keira Knightley and Adrian Brody. During September 2009, the hospital grounds were used as the site for "Exercise Green Gate", a counter-terrorist exercise run by the Scottish Government to test de-contamination procedures in the event of a nuclear, chemical or biological incident. This involved 250 volunteer "casualties" and 400 emergency staff. The site is now also popular with Urban Explorers people who enjoy exploring old and abandoned buildings, taking pictures to document their existence before they disappear due to either severe decay or demolition. The local health board however are not keen and as of 2005 have security patrolling the grounds to stop people entering the now dangerous and unstable buildings. (Shit load of good they were LMFAO) On the 1st of October 2015 Planning Permission for a residential and mixed use redevelopment of the former hospital site is being sought. The application notes some of the listed buildings at the site may be proposed for full demolition in a subsequent application. This may include villas 7,8,9 and 21, with other buildings potentially proposed for partial demolition. Unfortunately we never made it into that spectacular rec hall or the chapel, however what we did find that i hadnt seen before was this; Thanks for looking
  3. Empty since 1989 it's the sort of place that used to weigh sweets on scales.
  4. I have decided to place this report into others as it it a mix mash of a days trekking around East anglia. Separated I think they are a bit crap, but altogether it seems ok Went on one of those random drives that you do.. Just out and about looking for what cool stuff you can find. We had 2 things we wanted to see, one we could get in, but we would have got busted very quickly and then it would have been sealed up and nobody would be getting in for a while, so we gave it a miss, the 2nd we got seen by security while walking about. So it was now a case of lets just drive and see what we find.. It was mostly old houses that we found, and also some random fibre glass place, that looked smart from the outside, but megar trashed inside and not even worth getting the camera out. I came across this old house that was obviously part of a smallholding in the area, it was located just outside Ramsey Forty Foot, and we did notice that there was a good few of them along the road. 1 2 3 4 5 6 So next stop was RAF Upwood. One of those places that get done to death, and as I was in the area and had never been I thought I would go and have a little look around. This was one of those sites that just look the same as most others and after 30 mins of walking around you have shot most things, well until you come across the tanks. History Royal Air Force Upwood or more simply RAF Upwood is a former Royal Air Force station adjacent to the village of Upwood, Cambridgeshire, England in the United Kingdom. In the early 1930s, Britain realised its air defence capabilities were in urgent need of expansion. The major expansion of the Royal Air Force announced in 1934 resulted in many new airfields opening over the remainder of the decade. One of these was RAF Upwood. The old First World War airfield site was selected to be reactivated and expanded. The new station was designed to accommodate two medium bomber squadrons with room for a third. By 1936, construction had begun in earnest with two of five C-type hangars started. On 27 February 1937 the first flying unit arrived at Upwood in the form of No. 52 Squadron RAF flying Hawker Hinds. This unit was joined on 1 March 1937 by No. 63 Squadron and its Hawker Audaxes. During their time at Upwood, No 52 and 63 Squadrons became training units and took on both Fairey Battle and Avro Anson aircraft. In August and September 1939, the two squadrons were reassigned opening the field up to its new tenant, No. 90 Squadron flying Bristol Blenheims. With the end of the Second World War came a change in missions for the two squadrons at Upwood. No 156 Squadron was tasked with bringing food to Holland in support of Operation Manna then help repatriate former Prisoners of War as part of Operation Exodus. On 27 June 1945 the squadron was moved from Upwood. In place of the departing No 156 Squadron came No 105 Squadron, also flying Mosquitos. Both 105 and 139 Squadrons continued flying from RAF Upwood until February 1946. On 1 February 1946 No 139 Squadron moved to RAF Hemswell. On 4 February 1946 No. 105 Squadron was disbanded. Flying operations didn't cease for long. On 15 February 1946 Upwood became home to No. 102 Squadron flying Consolidated B-24 Liberator bombers. They spent the next several months bring British troops home from India. On 1 March 1946 the squadron was redesignated No 53. Squadron. The squadron was disbanded on 25 June 1946 soon after its last ferry flight. Two new squadrons of Lancasters called Upwood home starting on 29 July 1946 with arrival of No. 7 Squadron and No. 49 Squadron. On 4 November 1946 No. 148 Squadron and No. 214 Squadron were both reformed at Upwood. These new additions were part of a transition of Upwood from a training to attack mission. Both of the new squadrons also flew Lancasters. The four squadrons continued to fly their Lancasters until 1949 when they were transitioned to Avro Lincolns. Lincolns from 148 Squadron deployed to RAF Shallufa in January 1952 to reinforce British units in the Suez Canal Zone. This was in response to riots in Cairo and a generally unstable political situation in Egypt. During 1954 each of the four squadrons deployed to either RAF Tengah in Singapore in support of anti-communist operations in Malaysia or to Kenya in support of operations against the Mau Mau. Additionally, Lincolns from No 214 Squadron and No 7 Squadron took part in a secret mission in connection with nuclear trials conducted near Woomera, Australia. During this time a film production company produced a war time film play called Appointment in London. The company used three Lancasters in making the film but the background shots are of the four Squadrons of Lincolns and the film uses much of the airfield and buildings in its production showing a good view of Upwood at that time On 31 December 1954 Upwood lost one of its four flying units when No. 214 Squadron disbanded. This unit was replaced on 22 May 1955 when No. 18 Squadron moved to Upwood from RAF Scampton. This squadron brought something completely new to the base in the form of their English Electric Canberra jet bombers. This was followed by more Canberras when No. 61 Squadron moved in from RAF Wittering on 3 July 1955. Two more Lincoln squadrons disbanded on 1 August, 49 and 148. This was followed by the disbanding of the last Lincoln squadron, No. 7, on 1 January 1956. These were replaced throughout 1956 by more Canberra units; No. 50 Squadron on 9 January, No. 35 Squadron on 16 July and No. 40 Squadron on 1 November. However, this last squadron was disbanded on 15 December 1956. Eight Canberras B2 each from Nos. 7, 18,35,50 and 61 Squadron flew to Cyprus on 19 October in support of Operation Alacrity. Over four days in early November, these aircraft took part in raids on various targets in Egypt. This was the first combat operations by Upwood aircraft since the Second World War. The 32 planes returned to Upwood just in time for Christmas, arriving home on 24 December 1956. The next two years saw a series of unit disbandments and arrivals culminating in a slow winding down of flying operations at Upwood. On 1 February 1957, No. 18 Squadron was disbanded. On 31 March 1958 No. 61 Squadron disbanded. No. 542 Squadron arrived on 17 July along with No. 76 Squadron. No 542 Squadron was renamed to No. 21 Squadron on 1 October. The year 1959 saw the disbanding of No. 21 Squadron (15 January) and No. 50 Squadron (1 October). On 31 December 1960 No. 76 Squadron disbanded. The final flying unit No. 35 Squadron was disbanded on 11 September 1961. With the disbanding of No. 35 Squadron Upwood was transferred to RAF Strike Command who quickly set about transforming the airfield into a hub of various support activities. Over the next several months the station became home to No 4 Ground Radio Servicing Section, Radio Technical Publications Squadron, the Aeromedical Training Centre, the Joint School of Photographic Interpretation and three squadrons of HQ No 33 Field Wing, RAF Regiment. The different units had barely settled in when change came again. In early 1963 the RAF Regiment units departed. In 1964 the other units left as well, leaving Upwood with only a token care-taker staff. In March 1964, 22 Group of Technical Training Command arrived and set up their School of Management and Work Study. July saw the arrival of the School of Education and the RAF Central Library, followed in September by the School of Administration. Upwood was again becoming focused on training. Later training units included the Equipment Officers Training Centre and the Air Cadet Training Centre. These various training activities lasted, in one form or another, until the late 1970s. By 1981, the station was again almost dormant. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Then it was time to start making the drive home, but we decided to stop of at a old green grocers on the Norfolk suffolk borders to have a look. It was trashed, Signs of a fire, dodgy roofs and full of junk, so after salvaging a few images we decided to call it a day and head home. 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  5. Evening all, As part of our 35 man tour in April this year, one of the early morning stops on our first day was at this village on the outskirts of the powerplant and within the exclusion zone. The Chernobyl contamination was divided into four exclusion zones based on radiation amounts. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone with highest contamination is officially uninhabited. In truth, over 2,000 elderly villagers illegally resettled their homes and farms inside the Zone. Today nearly 400 remain. More than 3,000 workers manage the Zone, living in Chernobyl town during 4-day and 15-day shifts. Another 3,800 personnel commute daily to work at the Chernobyl plant from their new home in Slavutych. After the accident in 1986, over 160 towns and villages nearby were evacuated. Many were demolished, some were simply abandoned. This village that is beyond the main zone of exclusion where radiation fell but evacuation was not mandatory. In Ukraine, this included over two thousand villages. The accident and indirect consequences continue to affect these residents physically, economically, socially and psychologically. The questions remain - Why do people stay? No alternatives or a sense of duty or because this is their home? On wandering around in the time we had, there were a few villagers who came out to see what was going on as someone attempted to access their home. Just goes to show that people are resilient and decide to plod on, regardless of the situation. One had cattle and crops in the garden. Some of the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  6. Me and Ben began our usual roadtrip with a fairly early start which meant arriving at our first port of call; Sheffield, with good time to spare. The sun was shining and we headed straight for the disued Ski Village with my "Skiesta" in tow.... The Ski village was believed to be one of Europes largest and played part in the training of Olympic Skiers. As well as the various training slopes, recreational slopes and varying Dendix and Snowflex surfaces there was a Quad Bike Track, a Laser Tag Centre, Downhill biking track and a state of the art Bowling Alley which was built in 2009. A series of suspected arson attacks in Spring 2012 closed the slope and nothing remains of the main lodge building and bowling alley. The slope is decaying fast and has become a dumping site. #1 #2 The "Skiesta" a Ford Fiesta bonnet modified for Sledging #3 #4 #5 VIDEO Be sure to watch in HD https://flic.kr/p/nyCiXM More from the road trip to come
  7. So my first proper explore which isnt a cave/mine and i went on my own as i had nothing better to do, was ment to be doing a popular airsoft site in the area but a disagreement with the land owner made me change my mind, tried to get access to a brewary but thier was alot of police in area so ended up here. spent about an hour here their is nothing left and not really worth of a report/speel BUT for ease of my first proper UX and for saying hello on here here are a few pikkies DSC_0088 by kieronyoung, on Flickr DSC_0086 by kieronyoung, on Flickr DSC_0083 by kieronyoung, on Flickr DSC_0081 by kieronyoung, on Flickr Rest of set can be found here (if ive linked it correctly) http://www.flickr.com/photos/115490643@N07/sets/72157640258581944/
  8. A visit to Imber is always tinged with sadness for the people who were forced to leave by the MOD in 1943 never to return.A history of the place is to be found here http://www.abandonedcommunities.co.uk/imber.html The big house couldn't get in due to guard on the place sign on wall The pub Farmhouse farm building Unknown building outbuilding
  9. Part of my Greatest Hits Europe Urbex Tour Trip Tour 2013, a mad weekender in Belgium with a group of 4 who'd never been across the channel before. Doel is such a great place it warranted another visit for me, I missed a fair amount last year and this time went right to the furthest reaches of the village almost knocking on the door of the nuclear power station. Like last time I wandered off by myself soaking it in, but unlike last time as we turned up early morning there was pretty much nobody there, apart from a guy I saw walking his dog and some guys driving a van from the power station I saw nobody. A few more of the houses were opened up but I left my tripod in the car and from the looks of them they were all pretty ruined. More here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157634644906991/
  10. The small abandoned village called Polphail was built during the early 1970s to provide accommodation for up to 500 workers at a nearby oil platform construction yard in Portavadie. Unfortunately the yard was never completed and the village then lay dormant having never been occupied. The huge basin that was blasted out of the shore was dubbed ''The most expensive puddle in the world''. There have been development plans brought to the table including demolishing the site for a new marina, however due this was abandoned due to bats roosting there.
  11. Here's an arty farty vid I put together a few months ago of the abandoned village of Polphail on Scotlands west coast. Originally built in the mid 70's to house 500 oil workers for a nearby oil platform construction yard the village consisted of a series of 'flat pack' style accommodation units, bars, recreation rooms, canteen, bank, shops, laundry's and offices. The yard was near completion in 1976 when the oil boom nosedived, by which time the village was already complete. The yard was scrapped having never received a single order and the unused village was never inhabited. It was abandoned completely in 1980 and finally demolished in 2013. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QESBGaTIeLY
  12. Construction began in 1911 but completion of the original design did not occur until the early 1930s. The institution was planned as a "farm colony," whereby patients were put to work raising animals and growing food. Superintendent Charles S. Little told the New York Times: "In order to make this plan a success, it is necessary to begin to train the feeble minded when they are children. The feeble minded, if taken at an early age can be trained to do things better than if the education of which they are capable is postponed until the less pliable years." The site was named for William Pryor Letchworth, who served on the New York State Board of Charities from 1873 to 1896. Letchworth Village was one of the largest and most progressive facilities for the mentally retarded in the United States. Situated on 2000 acres of farmland with the Towns of Haverstraw and Stony Point. It was designed as a self-supporting community comprised of 130 field stone buildings. The facility closed on March 31, 1996, but administrative offices remained open until 2002. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  13. Following on from our visit HERE, we though we'd pop by and see how the demolition was getting on. CS has done a good write-up on the history side of things, so I'll leave that be and let the pictures speak. Present on this visit was myself, Hood_mad and Lola. Valet parking. (yeah the evo got a run-out) The top building has gone. (the one with the stairs) Plus the ones behind the monument. And the toilets that we stormed have gone too. The building between the changing rooms and the cookhouse has gone as well. The cookhouse. The monument. The church. No more of the church floor has been ripped up. Looking over to the Office? / Education? block. Photogenic chair?? Graffiti. Swimming pool. More devastation. Hood_mad. Sports hall. Hope you like the pics, there won't be much left soon.
  14. That was an awesome explore, had some fun until the scum turned up. Here's some of mine, bear in mind it was getting dark whilst we were there so the pics are poor. Bible found under the floor Hood_mad going up the bell tower Looking down Up to the second floor Me on the way up Waterfall at the outdoor pool Fire on the gym that was already burning when we got there (I think we disturbed someone) A good, but very surreal experience.
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