Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'York'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings,Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 13 results

  1. History; The convent is based in York. The convent has been closed since 2013 after being open for more than 140 years! The convent had to close due to it homing 40 nuns back in the 1920's but slowly declining to the final 8 nuns who couldn't manage the convent on their own. The property has been listed as a grade ll building due to it's architectural and historical importance. However the convent is apparently to be sold. Explore; Second explore of the weekend with @AndyK! and @SpiderMonkey in't North. Not a lot of time spent in this place due to security being on too us and creaky floorboards don't help either. However here are a few photo's that i got. Arch. Yellow Corridors. Windows. Bathroom. Doorway. Andy K Selfie. Stairway. White Corridor. Community Room. Doorway to Church. Thanks for looking! JP.
  2. Explored with Rott3nW00d A touch of history; Founded in 1864 by a small group of sisters from Bruge, and built but a Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical architect between 1870 & 1875, this convent is situated in 5 acres of land surrounded by a 20 ft wall. At its peak in the 1940's, St. Josephs Convent housed 40 nuns however the numbers have slowly declined in recent years. In the end, with only 8 nuns remaining, the convent closed as it was becoming too expensive to heat and maintain and the work load involved in keeping the nuns self sufficient became unmanagable. The Explore Left work for a weekend of exploring and set off to York. When we arrived at the location it resembled Piccidilly Circus so we retreated to a local pub for a few ales before returning for a second attempt. After negotiating that b****** 20 ft wall and exploring the over grown grounds we found an unlocked door. RESULT! Once inside we soon realised this place had a very very creepy feel about it. Most old abandoned places have a slight creepiness about them but this place at night is utterly terrifiying. With the old building creaking and the wind blowing doors we crept on noticing that some of the upper floor lights were on. Strange for an abandoned building no? Every room we went in held new surprises, from cupboards filled with every bit and bob imaginable, from sowing equipment to bottles of cologne. Theres was an uneasy amout of knives, scythes and other "weapon material" laying around along with a lot of mutilated baby dolls.. Spent about an hour in all before being rudely interupted by the North Yorkshire Police Force Few more photos from the evening; If you got this far, thanks for reading
  3. Explored with -Raz- and various non members. Bit of History; The Chocolate Works was the confectionery factory of Terry's of York, England. Opened in 1926, it closed in 2005 with the loss of 300 jobs, with production moved to other Kraft Foods sites in mainland Europe. Today, the site is being redeveloped as a mixed-use residential/commercial real estate development. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple (1926), Terry's Chocolate Orange (1931), and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. With the onset of World War II, confectionery production was immediately halted. The factory was taken over by F Hills and Sons of Manchester as a shadow factory, to manufacturer and repair aircraft propeller blades. With the factory handed back to the company post-war, production was difficult due to rationing and limited imports of raw cocoa. As a result, in 1954 production of the chocolate apple was phased out in favour of increased production of the chocolate orange. In 1975, Terry's was acquired by United Biscuits, forming the bulk of their confectionery division. After UB ran into financial difficulties in the early 1990s, they sold their entire confectionery division to Kraft Foods, who amalgamated it with Jacobs Suchard to create Terry's Suchard. From 2000, the company brand was changed from Terry's of York to simply Terry's, reducing the company's links to the city. Production was also scaled back, with just UK products and Terry's Chocolate Orange, Terry's All Gold and Twilight made for the international market. Explores; Always a good mooch around here, the factory areas are brilliant, but the real treasure here is the admin building with its large amount of glass work! You cant forget the clock tower though! Its a shame you cant get to all the clock faces but i guess you cant have everything! If you made it this far, thanks for looking
  4. While browsing flickr I came across shots of what looked like a large manor house with a stunning staircase. I new they explored with a different forum regular. So I checked it out and luckily it was posted on there. Terrys? I thought it was empty. I wasn't sure if the post was a bum steer the skylight is not visible on google earth. I took a punt and off I went at 3am. Not planned that well access was quite easy and I was bloody early, hanging around for the sun to rise. Nice views from the roof and clock tower though. The large art deco site opened in 1926 and made great chocolate until 2005 when it finally stopped production at the cost of around 300 jobs. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Thanks for looking you can find a few more shots at Terrys Chocolate Factory
  5. Visited with Hamtagger and Session9 The main reason I wanted to go here was for the stairs (And I took about 70 pictures of them all together) We left Lincolnshire early as always, driving down the motorway half asleep en route to York to pick Session9 up for our "First splore of the day" When we arrived at Terry's we headed straight for the Admin building but it looked like the only way in would be a tough one, and we had walked past 5 cameras without noticing (They're pretty small) Luckily we were there earlier than the security. We then decided to do the main "Crappy derp of a building" to begin with and head back for the Admin after. The main factory actually wasn't that bad, it was a bit bare but still better than some of the others I've been to. After an eventful walk around finding a potential IED, a turd on the roof and slipping on ice every 10 seconds we headed for the Clock tower, but it was sealed tighter than Fort Knox. (You win some, you lose some) So we walked back to the Admin building and made our way in. Session9 is approximately 8 feet tall so it was quite interesting squeezing through tiny gaps History Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. Pictures 1 Terry's Clock Tower and Factory 2 Circular Window in the main factory 3 What's a factory without a puddle reflection? 4 Lift 5 A selfie of a selfie 6 Ladies loo 7 The beginning of the stairs 8 Another angle 9 HD-ARRGHH 10 I wanted to go for a different angle than the others I'd seen, so I got Hamtagger to pose on a post with me. 11 I may have obsessed over these a bit 12 Framing the window with a window 13 Through the looking glass 14 Odd angles 15 Dome from above with Lens flare 16 Lights in a darkened room Thankyou for taking time to read my report. 97 more to come this year!
  6. History Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York with a history dating back to 1767. This factory opened in 1926 and became known as Terry's Confectionery Works. It was buil in an Art Deco style and included a distinct clock tower. Here new products including the Chocolate Apple (1926), Terry's Chocolate Orange (1931), and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. With the onset of the Second World War, confectionery production was immediately halted. The factory was taken over by F Hill's and Son's of Manchester as a shadow factory, to manufacture and repair aircraft propeller blades. With the factory handed back to the company post-war, production was difficult due to rationing and limited imports of raw cocoa. As a result, in 1954 production of the chocolate apple was phased out in favour of increased production of the chocolate orange. In 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. From 2000, the company brand was changed from Terry's of York to simply Terry's, reducing the company's links to the city. Production was also scaled back, with just UK products and Terry's Chocolate Orange, Terry's All Gold and Twilight made for the international market. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to absorb Terry's, switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to their own factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant. The factory closed on 30 September 2005, with the loss of 317 jobs. The factory was bought by developers Grantside, renamed The Chocolate Works, and in February 2010 planning permission was given for a £165 million redevelopment of the site as a mixed-use of residential, commercial and leisure. Redevelopment started in 2011, with removal of asbestos, followed by demolition of non-scheduled buildings in early 2012. Our Visit I jumped on a last minute coach from London with extreme_ironing on hearing news that construction work at Terry's has upped the pace recently and now has 24 hour security in place. We were a bit apprehensive about making such a long trip with the possibility of failure but both determined to see this place before it's demise. Thankfully our trip was well worth the effort as we managed to access the admin building, the factory and the old clock tower. Security always seemed to be one step behind us as we watched them nosing around each building after we'd moved onto the next one. It really is an amazing site, the admin building full of Art Deco features was a joy to explore, a real life Willy Wonka factory if you like. After 6 hours on site we headed off into the night for a well earnt curry and beers before hitting another of York's gems. The Pics Looking towards the main factory from the roof of the admin building, we had to stay low at this point as security was wandering about below us.... The ground floor of the admin building, everything decorated in Art Deco style.... Art deco detail The Safe Door Logo on the inside of the safe The grand entrance hall The stairs, lost count of how many pics I took in here.... Stained glass dome window above the staircase Office The manager's office overlooking downstairs Detail On top of the clock toweer Construction site next door with York Minster in the distance Looking down over the security hut with the factory to the right and admin building on the left Behind one of the clock faces Factory doors Not much to see inside the factory except long empty rooms like this The walls and windows are still pretty impressive for a factory though Watching security's movements over in the admin building The racecourse next door The clock tower from the top of the factory Night starting to close in Extreme Ironing chilling in the window frame waiting for security to finish his rounds below Thanks for looking
  7. First post on the forums use the Facebook page a bit so thought i'd put a report up on here look forward to chatting to you all! Headed over to York this morning to have a look at terry's and was pleasantly surprised to find that secca was nowhere to be seen, had the place to ourselves for a good few hours making our way through the factory building and the admin as the tower is tighter than a nuns cun*. Only got pictures from the admin but I'm eager to go have another look round here, the skylight and stairs are awesome! History The Chocolate Works was the confectionery factory of Terry’s of York, England. Opened in 1926, it closed in 2005 with the loss of 300 jobs, with production moved to other Kraft Foods sites in mainland Europe. Today, the site is being redeveloped as a mixed-use residential/commercial real estate development. In 1923, Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business, Terry’s of York. They revamped the company, launching new products and bought a site in York on which to develop a new factory. Built in an Art Deco style, the factory known as The Chocolate Works included a distinct clock tower. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple (1926), Terry’s Chocolate Orange (1931), and Terry’s All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. With the onset of World War II, confectionery production was immediately halted. The factory was taken over by F Hill’s and Son’s of Manchester as a shadow factory, to manufacturer and repair aircraft propeller blades. With the factory handed back to the company post-war, production was difficult due to rationing and limited imports of raw cocoa. As a result, in 1954 production of the chocolate apple was phased out in favour of increased production of the chocolate orange. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant.[4] The factory closed on 30 September 2005. Bought by developers Grantside, they consulted local people on how to develop the site, renamed The Chocolate Works. Their initial proposed development was rejected by the City of York Council. In February 2010, with the Grade II listed Time Office and Art Deco clock tower secured and scheduled for refurbishment and despite objections from the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment,the firm was given planning permission for a £165million mixed-use of residential, commercial and leisure.The eventual scheme is projected to create more than 2,700 new jobs in new and refurbished offices, two hotels, shops, bars, cafés and restaurants, over 250 homes, a nursery, care home and medical centre. Redevelopment started in 2011, with removal of asbestos by trained and certified contractors, followed by demolition of non-scheduled buildings in early 2012. In April 2013, the site was acquired by joint developers Henry Boot Developments and David Wilson Homes. Thanks for reading have a happy new year!
  8. Hi explorers! Glad to share with you an exploration of a railroad tracks in the USA, an amazing place! Hope you enjoy!
  9. Hey there! Visited this one with Miz Firestorm, Miss Lightyear and Goldie on a bit of a Yorkshire tour. Could have easily spent a few more hours here just wandering around, loved it. Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. In 1767 as Robert Berry opened a shop close to Bootham Bar, York, selling cough lozenges, lemon and orange candied peel and other sweets. Joined by William Bayldon, the partners renamed the business Bayldon and Berry confectionery. Born in Pocklington, Joseph Terry came to York to serve as an apprentice apothecary in Stonegate. On gaining his certificates, he set up as a chemist in Walmgate. But after marrying Harriet Atkinson in 1823, he met her elderly uncle Robert Berry. After William Bayldon left the business, Terry agreed to become a partner in the confectionery business, and after closing his chemists shop joined the confectionery business in St Helen's Square, York. In 1825 after the death of Robert Berry, Terry agreed a new partnership with Robert's son George, renaming the business Terry & Berry. In 1828, George left the business and it was renamed Terry's of York. Using his skills as a chemist, Joseph developed new lines of chocolate, confectionery, sugared sweets, candied peel, marmalade and medicated lozenges. He began using the developing railway network of the North Eastern Railway, to distribute his products over the North of England and as far away as London. In 1923, Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business. They revamped the company, launching new products and bought a site off of Bishopthorpe Road, York on which to develop a new factory known as Terry's Confectionery Works. Built in an Art Deco style, the factory included a distinct clock tower. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple, Terry's Chocolate Orange, and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to absorb Terry's, switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to their own factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant. The factory closed on 30 September 2005, with the loss of 317 jobs. After all that history.. Photos! Cheers for looking
  10. The Chocolate Factory Industrial Elegance History It may seem like a set from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, but this impressive Chocolate Works in York is really real! Built 1924 to 1930 after Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business, the factory produced chocolate and all sorts of confectionery until its closure in 2005. The buildings are fronted with an attractive Art Deco style and included a large clock tower brandishing the company’s name on each clock face. The group of buildings on the site include a 500ft five storey factory block, the clock tower, administration block, time office and a liquor factory, all built in a matching style reflecting the strength and importance of Terry’s corporate image. The buildings are of strong historic significance as they represent the most complete surviving expression of the importance of chocolate production in York. This importance has earned the buildings grade II listed status. 1. That Staircase! The Terry’s Chocolate business itself has a longer past than the buildings. The original company was formed in 1767 by Messrs Bayldon and Berry, and only taking on the name of Terry’s when Joseph Terry joined in 1823, and finally became Terry’s of York in 1828. Joseph Terry was a chemist and put his skills to use developing new lines and perfecting the company’s chocolate and other products. By utilising the new North Eastern Rail Network the company was able to distribute its new products far and wide, while the River Humber provided a means for shipments of sugar and cocoa to be delivered. Frank and Noel Terry joined the business in 1923, revamping it and launching additional product lines to be produced at their new factory, known as Terry’s Confectionery Works. United Biscuits acquired Terry’s in 1975 but financial issues in the early 1990s saw Kraft Foods purchase the confectionery division. In 2004 Kraft foods transferred production to other factories in Europe and closed the York site with the loss of 300 jobs. 2. Terry’s Chocolate Works and Clock Tower Our Visit The Willy Wonka feel to this place and the epic Titanic-like staircase had placed this one right at the top of my list. It’s almost always sealed up tight so I didn’t expect I’d ever get a chance to see it, but while in the area with Proj3ctM4yh3m, PeterC4, Carl H and Philberto, we thought it might be worth stopping off to check. We got lucky! It may have taken a bit of effort and resulted in a trip to A&E but I managed to get in! Worth the effort I’d say! 3. Driveway 4. Admin Building 5. The Staircase 6. Under the Dome 7. Doorway 8. Panelling Detail 9. Room in the Chambre du Chocolate 10. Details 11. Through the Round Window 12. Chambre du Chocolate 13. Corridor 14. Large Space 15. Willy Wonka’s Office 16. The Big Man’s Toilet 17. Nice Room 18. Selfie on the Stair
  11. The Royal York Hotel,a fine Art Deco style building completed in 1935 , replacing the original Victorian hotel of the same name. Closed in 2006. My guess is that it will be turnt into flats in the near future! The video tour! http://youtu.be/mKuRE1R4xvY
  12. Zoo York - 2011

    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
  13. 1861 built as a Mansion for the governor on New York & 1923 to ? It was turned into a Convent. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
×