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Found 118 results

  1. This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  2. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  3. My Visit - This one was quite fun, although there is not many items left to see, its a great walk under Liverpool, with some nice stone and brickwork to see. We arrived quite early, and had absolutely no trouble finding and getting into the tunnel, the rest is best seen in pictures!
  4. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  5. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  6. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  7. First Post Guys! Anyways, my group of friends and I found an abandoned Gas Station south of Atlanta. Apparently, the gas station went bankrupt due to the county screwing them over. A new highway system was out in, and the road to the gas station was relocated, so in order to get to the station, one would have to travel a good 5 minutes out of their way. Not worth it. So the station closed down and now it looks like this. May go back to take more pictures soon, stay posted. Have a great day guys, and be safe!
  8. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  9. Germany Abandoned Fuel Storage

    One of a Kind Acoustic Places ! Never seen anything like this Fuel Storage of the NVA Troops in Germany
  10. Baikonur cosmodrome.
  11. History : Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1] Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan. In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening. In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3] In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4] In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6] In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful. On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid. 2006 controversy A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists. Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.
  12. I wont bore you with too much history, this place has been done before, and has been done better than my attempt. I just want to share some of my stuff, and hopefully get to know some people on the forum as I am pretty new to urbex. HISTORY: St Joseph's College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary in Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992. My Version = I was planning on visiting Crank Caverns with a few friends to start our exploring adventures with an easy location, but on route, I found the College. We parked quite a bit away from the main road into the spot, so I dont even know what that side looks like, but I will be returning. We approached through the woods, down a public footpath and arrived at the amazing building. We spent around 15 minutes taking a few snaps, looking at possible entrance points, but by the time we made it around to the cemetary, a friendly security guard came around and informed us that we were trespassing and had to leave. We had a bit of a chat with the friendly bloke before heading off on our way with a bit more information. My friends and I also run a facebook page where we post all of our outdoorsy stuff, bikes, urbex, 4x4ing, anything really. https://www.facebook.com/0151outdoors/ Anyway, heres some pictures, if anyone here can shed some light on approaching this place with more chance of success, give me a message please.
  13. UK Abandoned train yard/factory (cinematic)

    Hi and happy new year! Here’s a short video of a recent explore of Healey Mills marshalling Yard and Dudfleet mill - thanks for watching!
  14. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  16. USA Prison (U.S)

    Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy.... It was the site of a controversial decades-long dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical weapons research projects involving testing on inmates. The prison is also notable for several major riots in the early 1970s. The prison was home to several trials which raised several ethical and moral questions pertaining to the extent to which humans can be experimented on. In many cases, inmates chose to undergo several inhumane trials for the sake of small monetary reward. The prison was viewed as a human laboratory. “All I saw before me were acres of skin. It was like a farmer seeing a fertile field for the first time.” Dr. X One inmate described experiments involving exposure to microwave radiation, sulfuric and carbonic acid, solutions which corroded and reduced forearm epidermis to a leather-like substance, and acids which blistered skin in the testicular areas. In addition to exposure to harmful chemical agents, patients were asked to physically exert themselves and were immediately put under the knife to remove sweat glands for examination. In more gruesome accounts, fragments of cadavers were stitched into the backs of inmates to determine if the fragments could grow back into functional organs. So common was the experimentation that in the 1,200-person prison facility, around 80% to 90% of inmates could be seen experimented on. The rise of testing harmful substances on human subjects first became popularized in the United States when President Woodrow Wilson allowed the Chemical Warfare Service (CAWS) during World War I. All inmates who were tested upon in the trials had consented to the experimentation, however, they mostly agreed for incentives like monetary compensation. Experiments in the prison often paid around $30 to $50 and even as much as $800. “I was in prison with a low bail. I couldn’t afford the monies to pay for bail. I knew that I wasn’t guilty of what I was being held for. I was being coerced to plea bargain. So, I thought, if I can get out of this, get me enough money to get a lawyer, I can beat this. That was my first thought.” I expected to find an epic medical ward only to be filled with disappointment. The practice was so common I can only assume it was conducted everywhere. Many advocates of the prison trials, such as Solomon McBride, who was an administrator of the prisons, remained convinced that there was nothing wrong with the experimentation at the Holmesburg prison. McBride argued that the experiments were nothing more than strapping patches of cloth with lotion or cosmetics onto the backs of patients and argued this was a means for prisoners to earn an easy income. The negative public opinion was particularly heightened by the 1973 Congressional Hearing on Human Experimentation. The hearing was supposed to discuss the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and clarify the ethical and legal implications of human experimental research. This climate called for a conscious public which rallied against the use of vulnerable populations such as prisoners as guinea pigs. Companies and organizations who associated themselves with human testing faced severe backlash. Amidst the numerous senate hearings, public relation nightmares, and opponents to penal experimentation, county prison boards realized human experimentation was no longer acceptable to the American public. Swiftly, human testing on prisoners was phased out of the United States. Only a renovated gymnasium is considered suitable for holding inmates. That building is frequently used for overflow from other city jails. The district attorney launched an extensive two year investigation documenting hundreds of cases of the rape of inmates. The United States had ironically been strong enforcers of the Nuremberg Code and yet had not followed the convention until the 1990s. The Nuremberg code states: “[T]he person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, overreaching, or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision.” The prison trials violated this definition of informed consent because inmates did not know the nature of materials they were experimented with and only consented due to the monetary reward. America’s shutting down of prison experimentation such as those in the prison signified the compliance of the Nuremberg Code of 1947. You look so precious.
  17. Too lazy to walk down stairs or straighten my camera.
  18. Spain Abandoned 1859s hotel

    Hi m8s! This is the last adventure I lived with my brother, exploring and old hotel and some random abandoned houses. Cheers!
  19. I recently found this huge abandoned hotel in a sorry overgrown state. So I thought I would wizz the flying camera around it. I didn't go inside unfortunately as the perimeter fence looked rather harsh, with lots of no entry signs. plus it was way to hot. The Penang Mutiara Beach Resort in Jalan Teluk Bahang has been left totally abandoned since it shut its doors in 2006. Thanks
  20. Hello everyone. I was refereed to join the forum from the Facebook group. Im from Ohio, USA and have followed urban exploring for a while. Recently I started getting out and doing it myself. I mainly film videos and post them on youtube but I also take pictures when I'm scouting new areas. I was out the other day scouting an area and took some pictures. I'm looking forward to going back.
  21. A look around the abandoned Beijing film academy which includes a large amount of Terracotta Army soldiers, a castle and a large Shanghai style town movie set!
  22. hallo, this video is about abandoned swimming pool in Slovakia. It is my first (but not last - soon there will be more) so I hope you like it. Thank you.
  23. Other Nearly Abandoned :)

    This 1 minute clip was shot yesterday. Better with audio.
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