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Found 7 results

  1. Abandoned Abbey

    Abandoned Abbey somewhere in Poland Hi all! First uploaded on FB group. Now here Thanks for your support! I hope you like it! History of the building/s http://tinyurl.com/q68noe4
  2. The original Abbey Mills Pumping Station, in Abbey Lane, London E15, is a sewerage pumping station, designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver. It was built between 1865 and 1868. It was designed in a cruciform plan, with an elaborate Byzantine style, described as The Cathedral of Sewage. It has a twin, Crossness Pumping Station, south of the River Thames at Crossness, at the end of the Southern Outfall Sewer. The pumps raised the sewage in the London sewerage system between the two Low Level Sewers and the Northern Outfall Sewer, which was built in the 1860s to carry the increasing amount of sewage produced in London away from the centre of the city. Two Moorish styled chimneys – unused since steam power had been replaced by electric motors in 1933 – were demolished during the Second World War, as they were a landmark for German bombers on raids over the London docks. The building still houses electric pumps – to be used in reserve for the new facility next door. The main building is grade II* listed and there are many grade II listed ancillary buildings, including the stumps of the demolished chimneys. The modern pumping station (Station F) was designed by architects Allies and Morrison. The old building (Station A) has electrical pumps for use as a standby; the modern station is one of the three principal London pumping stations dealing with foul water. One of world's largest installation of drum screens to treat sewage was constructed as part of the Thames Tideway Scheme. The historic pumping station at Abbey Mills is an operational by Thames Water and access is by special pre-booked tour only as you can see this place is still running in standby mode. this building use to house great big pumps all thats left of them is the base's sitting in the water. Same building as above but from higher up and taken in the day. well there you go guys
  3. My last foray with exploring this year ended with beauty. After a stupid amount of driving over the previous days, I was shattered, driving from as far south as I've been before, driving to Wales to drop of Lowri an then heading ver to the Midlands to get some rest with Project Mayhem who kindly put me up for the night. I set off to Chaise Abbey after some a tip off from AndyK, I was off as soon as I woke to get it done before the tour bus arrived. After a well deserved McDonalds, I arrived at my parking location and set off on a long convoluted route I chose as the one that would keep me away from any game keepers and locals. Apart from acting like a gun dog and rising up a few pheasants, well 200 or so, I eventually reached the outsite the Abbey and it was a glorious site. Quickly finding a way in, there were many ways I saw from my initial walk around, I was in and decided nervous about being inside, there was a lot of rotten floors and joists; stairs had collapsed, floors collapsed, but work had been ongoing and looked safe enough to carry on. Quickly finding my way around, I find the room most come to see and the name of the location - the Chaise Longue Room The main hall Grand Staircase Some of the furniture and Fireplaces were outstanding. Couple of the grand rooms Always great to find see some vintage bicycles Dolls chair and chess / chequers table Heading upwards Really enjoye this nice relaxed explore, spent a couple hours inside, and had a long walk back to the motor. Thanks for looking!
  4. ...Chaise Abbey... CRACKIN' way to kick off 2014 having leisurely mooch round this beautiful but VERY decayed building!! Bumped into Lucky Pants and The Un Invited while I was in there which was a rather nice surprise!! Good ta see ya folks!! Not gonna waffle on... So heres some pics... As always... Thanks for looking...
  5. So I’ve seen a few other perm visits on OS forum so thought I’d add this one into the mix as I could not find any other reports from Abbey. I know in the past people accessed this site without permission and must admit was pretty surprised (and impressed with the ingenuity used to get in . Its now sealed up tighter than a tight thing; and still an active pumping station, but I believe Abbey participates in London Open Week (so try and get your name down if you fancy a visit). The Blurb from Wiki - Abbey Mills Pumping Station is a sewage pumping station, designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver. It was built between 1865 and 1868. It was designed in a cruciform plan, with an elaborate Byzantine style, described as The Cathedral of Sewage. Another of Bazalgette's designs, Crossness Pumping Station, is located south of the River Thames at Crossness, at the end of the Southern Outfall Sewer. Pano of the main pump hall (this shot gave me so much grief when processing due to distortion and this is the best I could do with it). The Victorians who built this place really went to town. Unbelievable this is just a sewage pumping station!! outlet valves vertical shot up into the roof lantern C- Station Pano of walkway above the main pump hall.
  6. Abbey Mills, London 2013

    Hi guys, Won't put any other posts up tonight - don't want to flood the boards and be throw off This was a permission visit and a total one off. A lot of this is still in operation. The original Abbey Mills Pumping Station, in Abbey Lane, London E15, is a sewage pumping station, designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver. It was built between 1865 and 1868. It was designed in a cruciform plan, with an elaborate Byzantine style, described as The Cathedral of Sewage. A few hours travel from sunny South Wales to London and stayed for 4 hours with the small crew invited. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 Cheers for looking.
  7. There has been scaffolding up here for quite some time, and it was obvious some brilliant views could be had from the top! So I set out one cold December night, found my way to bottom of the ladder, and began climbing. There was a PIR about 20 feet up, which turned out not to be connected to anything - so I carried on until I reached the turreted roof. It was a great spot to sit (when out of view) and enjoy the unique views! The church is opposite a monastery - here's a snippet of history quoted from pugin.com: "This is a Grade 1 listed building of as much historic value as The Grange next door. Despite having a private chapel in his house, Pugin built St. Augustine's for himself. It was begun in 1844, Pugin made only one plan for the building and this was where the foundations should be. From then on it grew out of a passion for the endeavour. The construction ceased from time to time since funds frequently ran out and Pugin would only use the best materials. He had stone bought from Whitby, as well as using local flint. The church was not finished at Pugin's death and the outside wall next to the road was only at waist height and approximately ten foot long. However this was completed by his eldest son Edward who was also an architect." Enjoy the photographs! Thanks for looking!
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