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Found 100 results

  1. To me this was some proper exploring. All I had been given by Mr. Perjury Saint was the name of a premises in Oldham that might be worth a look on the way past, a few days before I set off up north with Landie Man. I had no idea what it looked like on the outside, hadn't seen any photos of the inside on the internet and had no idea how to get in beforehand. Considering the last time I had explored a building in Oldham it was set on fire by some yobbos whilst we were inside I was slightly skeptical of doing anything in the area! It turned out to be a really nice site, not the biggest industrial location ever but one with a lot of goodies to poke through and some lovely features which in turn reminded me of both George Barnsley's and George Dyke's factories elsewhere. A bit of history borrowed from their still active website... Sadly the company went into liquidation in June 2013 (although parts, particularly the upstairs of the shop area looked to have been empty for decades!) and the land has sat vacant since. The owners put the closure down to the development of the metrolink cutting off their business from customers. We were pushed for time a bit with parking restrictions etc so my time poking around in the offices was sadly shorter than I would have liked, but I enjoyed my wander around here. Oldham has redeemed itself. Thanks for looking as ever, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157652627091411
  2. Tower Bridge Magistrates Court is a Grade II listed building dating back to 1906. The three storey building was designed by John Dixon Butler with a stone and brickwork exterior and an Edwardian Baroque style roof. The Court entrance is flanked by high socles supporting giant Ionic columns to the 1st and 2nd floors with the Royal coat of Arms above. There are 3 courtrooms, two are formal dark wood panelled traditional courtrooms and one is a late 1970's relatively modern courtroom. The court closed it's doors in June of last year and there are now plans for it to be turned into a hotel. I've had my eye on this for a good while, it has 24hr security inside the building and various people turn up to to work in the offices upstairs. With no obvious ways inside and with so much activity I was thinking of trying for a permission visit but just hadn't got around to it. Then something amazing happened when myself and Gabe walked past at 6am after a night of rooftopping and drinking. We rang the doorbell, security came to the door, barely even looked at us and just waved us straight in as though he was expecting us. We waltzed straight past him like we were meant to be there and disappeared through the first door we could see. We managed an hour sneaking around inside before a different security guy found us and asked us who we were. We gave him a load of cock and bull about how we were doing a photography project and our lecturer had arranged our visit. After checking his records he said we would have to come back another time when permission had been established, apparently the guy who opened the door for us was on his first shift and had assumed we were meant to be there. It was a hilarious adventure from start to finish, the only gutter was we didn't get to see Court No.1. Still, we saw the two other courts, found loads of cells downstairs, and ventured into part of the police station before we got rumbled. I took a few externals months ago before the hoarding went up.... Reception Area Court No. 2 Court No. 3 Heading for the cells Check-in Counter The Cells Taking the piss Our friendly but confused escort showing us the towards the door Sneaky last pic before we left, the door to Court No.1 on the far right, the one that got away..... [ Thanks for looking
  3. History: founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Explore: This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these.. As always, thanks for looking!
  4. This is my George Barnsley visit, there are many like it, but this one is mine My first visit, the gate's always been shut before, I'm sure I'll be back. You all know the history, on with the pics... Wouldn't be a GB report without that pic
  5. After what seems like forever without an explore (in reality it's only been 3 weeks) I finally got let loose on the abandonments again! By 9.30am myself and OverArch had racked up a trio of fails in quick succession so it looked to all intents and purposes like today was heading down the toilet. Heading to Selly Oaks was rather glum, it was grey and raining and not very nice but after some dumb luck and bumping into a trio of other explorers the five of us located an access point which proved utterly undignified for nearly all of us, especially me as per usual. We went our separate ways once inside and only bumped into each other a couple more times, the place is huge and keeps going on and on and on. If you guys (and girl) are reading this, thanks for the company And the extra special icing on the cake was managing to get into the mortuary, after spotting a pair of other explorers attempting to access it we realised what we had to do to get in, to say it's slightly sketchy is an understatement but all five of us were in after a bit of lateral thinking and more dumb luck. Definitely the nicest mortuary I've seen and with some lovely decayed laboratories on the upper floor as well. Over four hours later we made it back to the car, pleased that the day hadn't been a total appalling failure. It's been a while since I explored any site of this size let alone a hospital of this size and despite it's largely modernised appearance I rather enjoyed it. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653758432252
  6. Seems as if the tour bus is in town, and I'm the last off:D The History: I'm sure everyone knows already, and most people won't bother reading (I wouldn't blame you) but have some history anyway.. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening On the morning of 23 May 2010 a ‘Service of Thanks’ was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to “Take a Trip Down Memory Laneâ€, sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganization was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best burns units in the country. It was also home to the Royal Center for Defense Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans. The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war. There were also difficulties when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman. A report published by the House of Commons Defense Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign and praised the clinical care provided to military patients. The Explore: Now it's not often I get to say this, but I actually got a lay in on an explore - 7am! But we were up and out sharpish, and heading over to Selly. We got there, and after pondering several entry methods for a while, we finally decided. Except, it involved a hell of a lot of bushes, brambles and a few stinging nettles, but eventually we were in! We were heading towards the morgue when we heard voices.. had we been spotted already?! Thankfully not, and it was other explorers. Quick introductions were made, and after a stupid climb through a very awkward entry point we were in! Decided to have a look round the main hospital after, and eventually to the other buildings.. big mistake! Within about 3 minutes we'd tripped 4 alarms. We snapped a few quick pictures, and made an exit. Good timing really, as by the time we'd got back to the car and were heading home, police were all over it.. lucky escape:thumb Better get on with some pictures.. As always, thanks for taking the time to view this. Cheers guys
  7. Decided it was time to get out exploring again so sorted out a visit to Selly Oak as its been on my list for ages. Met up with two other explorers on the day and had a good look around. Getting into the mortuary is a bit risky but so worth it! History The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Pictures Mortuary Outpatients X-Ray Main Hospital More pictures up here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157654300167915
  8. I think this can be described as a 'hidden gem' for sure. It's kind of like a half-size Clockhouse Brickworks and with just as much stuff to look at. As far as explores go it was the most peaceful chilled out and generally relaxed wander I've had for a long time, helped by the glorious weather. On the way out, we were stopped by one of the buildings caretakers/ex-workers who was relieved to see we were only taking photos and myself and Landie had quite a long chat with him about the site, the buildings they supplied bricks for, and other stuff. He informed us that there is a staff of nine people who work on the land and farm around the site and look after the place. He also said that the planning application for works expires this July and they will be looking to do 'something' with it before it lapses. The Selborne Brickworks was first opened in 1901 and extended later in life to it's current size. It was bought out by Tower Brick & Tile Co. and closed in 2009 as a result of the recession. Like with Clockhouse, when it shut down it did so without notice, so everything was left inside as it was the day it closed. There are still racks of roofing tiles in one of the dryers and bricks in the kilns. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653556365939
  9. One of the main draws for me in my travels to America has been the Catskill Mountains area of upstate New York and it's many abandoned Jewish holiday resorts. I hope to cross a few more of them off my list on my next trip over but the one which always captured my imagination and the one I was very happy to see last year, Grossingers, is also one of the largest and most famous. Thirty years of decay hasn't been kind. This is one part of 20th Century American society/history which absolutely fascinates me, the meteoric rise and mid-1980s fall of dozens of these resorts as cheap package holidays and cheap flights swamped the market. Unfortunately I don't know the rough dates for the comparison images but most of them likely stem from the 1960s heyday. The first comparison is Grossinger's most iconic area, the indoor swimming pool. This second shot shows the Olympic sized outdoor pool. After the resort closed in 1986, the Cabana buildings and changing rooms were demolished. This next pair shows an often overlooked area of the resort as it's separated from the main site by a road. This was the ski lodge, during the winter when it was snowy there was also a toboggan run down the slope. During the summer months Grossinger's became the first place in the USA to use artifical snow on it's slopes. This pair shows the inside of the Tennis Lodge, located between the all-weather outdoor courts and the indoor courts which were accessed up the small staircase. And whilst it's not a direct comparison as none of my photos show the perfect angle, this last pair shows the then recently constructed 'Jennie G' hotel building with what it looks like today. After closure in 1986 the two-storey walkways between it and the main complex were demolished. I hope this provided some interest to you guys
  10. Unfortunately, I don't know any history. By the way, all photos were only taken from the outside, through the bars of the windows. Therefore, no access was possible - or if, only by a deep cellar window. But even that wasn't possible because of local residents. So I only took a few photos from the outside and then we drove on. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  11. Willis & Gambler is situated in Saffron Walden. Starting life in 1990 as a bed designer and importer based in Takeley, Willis & Gambier moved to the Radwinter Road site in 1998. In June 2008 they leased a 545,000sq ft warehouse in Peterborough. The company sold its products to top of the range stores, such as John Lewis, House of Fraser, Laura Ashley and Marks and Spencer. In 2008 the company was closed down after going in to administration. I visited this place after trying to find somewhere else but that place turned out not to be derelict at all so thought we would try here, you could tell it wasn't going to be pretty inside, every single window was smashed as we walked up to it. Access was relatively easy and there was no one on site at all other than a few dead birds. Just a massive empty space really with a few cool bits of graffiti. That is basically it but thought I'd share. Loading bays from the inside There was a lot of ramps about, obviously the skater boys had been in I have found newspaper at every single place I've been to recently, 1982, I was 4! Loved this The only work related item I found Weirdo's...
  12. Hello again So over the bank holidays we took a trip to see an old friend (George Barnsley) havnt been for a while and was in the area so thought why the heck not George Barnsley & Sons Ltd specialised in tools for shoe makers and leather workers. The building closed around 2004. Enjoy... Thanks for looking
  13. With this being my first reported post on here as regards a derelict site, I thought it apt that I include one that is literally a cock stride from me. In fact, the rather nice non smoking stack can be seen poking above the roof tops from the bedroom window "GLOBE MILLS". She stands proud and dominates the center of the village. Slaithwaite is the only village in the entire country that has a canal system running straight through it. The mill was founded in 1887, and produced high quality worsted yarns. There's one thing for sure though! The words 'Made In Huddersfield' will always be synonymous with quality cloth. A man was always proud to wear a suit bearing the said same label. The firm was taken over by the Bradford based Amalgamated Textile Company in 1923. In the 1960's they employed 700 people. Many would travel from surrounding areas such as Barnsley in fleets of buses that were especially laid on. Oh happy days eh! By the 1980's the number of employed had dropped to 200, and by 1987 the company was spinning over 10 million miles of yarn a year,producing luxury fibres such as alpaca, mohair, angora and camel-hair. It finally closed It's doors in 2005, and had a massive impact on village life. Not just regarding unemployment, but small retail businesses also suffered because of the closure. ............................... Good things come to those who wait though! http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-west-yorkshire-news/2013/05/23/multi-million-pound-plans-to-transform-slaithwaite-mill-submitted-to-kirklees-council-86081-33370830/ ​It seems the sleeping beauty may have a new lease of life after all. Fingers crossed eh ........................................ The Mill is stripped of all It's former humble attire, but she still looks good in my eyes. There were some nice situations in here with great light to play with. A dirty sink and some form of cheese. Very nice. This is the connecting walkway between the Mills. Unfortunately blocked at one end. But this is how it looks from the outside. I simply loved all the colors in here. I then found the steps to heaven via the roof void. And up into the central tower and out to the roof. The Mill in the background is Spa Mill. It's still in operation today. One of the very few left in the Colne Valley that are. It's sister company Sybro Spinning, just up the road, closed not too long ago. It's now trashed beyond belief. The chavs around here certainly know how to conduct the wrecking ball? Back inside then......... Is it pushing the right buttons for you!! It's one of these places you just don't want to leave. This poor buggers here for the duration though. I could have used those maggots for fishing. ....................... Arty shot of the fire escape. And plant life desperately seeking an entry point. Air filters from the air con system. These were massive. Part of the original rope race which powered the looms. Beautiful. Lovely vintage lift. It never came though. Down the stairs and out we go. Visited with fannyadams and judderman 62 on more than one occasion. .............. So It's adios from...... Thanks for looking. ​Pub time. ​
  14. Well I thought id best share guys. If you are easily offended I apologise and you should move swiftly on as that is not my intention. I feel I have the duty to share my experiences in the form of imagery and this is my disclaimer. As in keeping with the recent facebook posts I thought id share my shit in a jar. Just saying I was shocked and horrified when I noticed the sell by date on my pigs feet was June 1999 and pickled eggs 2001 Thanks for looking and hope you enjoyed. Posted Cos Im a twat lol
  15. How many people do I hear complaining about games request on FaceBook. Just so many myself included and am bored with the long winded means FB provide. So had a quick look at a way of finding a better way of filtering them out. Many like playing but simply not my thing and have received so many recently. I quickly found one that really works and is free. I gave it a good trial and have been no problems or issues ,so thought id share. Heres a YouTube tutorial link. http://youtu.be/jm3byBz_0DI Also the link to the down load. http://www.fbpurity.com/ Fucking bliss had no Games requests for almost a week and you can filter out so much more It gives you this on your tool bar Click and gives you this and problems solved and lots more. FaceBook are none to keen on the link to site and will block it if posted on their medium hence ive shared here.
  16. The factory consists of a paper mill, a power plant and a boiler house. The oldest buildings date from the 19th century. The factory was finaly closed in the mid 90s. Last weekend I was there again with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and MiaroDigital. The state has unfortunately continued to deteriorate due to vandalism. In the control room, the phone was destroyed and an idiot distributed lubricating oil on the floor of the machine hall. In addition, from the small laboratory also disappeared different things. The following pics are a mix from my 4th and 5th re-visit in June 2014 (marked with *) and March 2015. So don't be surprised because the things described above on the photos are still intact / exist. 1* 2* 3 4 5* 6* 7* 8 9* 10* 11* 12 13 14 15 16 (To this perspective, I was inspired by a picture of Kalum_a.) 17* 18* 19* 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  17. After almost four years, I've revisited this nice Oldie. Not much has changed - apart from the fact that sadly all handrails of the staircases were destroyed in the meantime. This time I also took a look into the former stables, that I didn't notice on my first visit. The hunting lodge was built in the 18th century. End of the 19th century, the castle was connected to the drinking water network, but already in 1900 it was in parts demolished due to disrepair. Later, a castle-like hotel was built at the same place. The surviving elements of the previous castle were integrated in the new building. Finally the hotel was closed in 1980 due to large structural damage. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Finally, as a comparison, two photos of the staircase from my first visit in 2011. 28 29
  18. George Barnsley and sons, a key toolmakers in Sheffield's history, well at least for us lot.. Heres a small set for you i took a few months back now enjoy:p THanks ........
  19. The North West like many parts of the country is riddled with old coal mine workings, and in these parts if you do your research you can turn up some absolute gems. This beaut is a fine example of a mid 19th Century coal and fire clay operation that would of fed into the insatiable demand for coal and fire clay during the height of the Industrial revolution. As you move around the miles of workings and wagon roads, it's quite a humbling experience to think that where you are crawling over 200 years ago children as young as eight put in twelve hour shifts!!! In 1842 a royal commission investigated the employment of children in mines. The result was an act in the same year forbidding the employment of women and children underground.
  20. Dropped by 12 sites (and had a good look at a few more) over several days in a bit of a manic trip around Belgium on the weekend past with The_Raw, Wevsky, Obscurity and Monkey. Photography came secondary to actually looking around (!) so I've compressed the images into one post. Also just don't want to spam the board with 12 posts. Also lazy. Fort de Fl�malle Built between 1881 and 1884 as a group of 12 forts surrounding Liege, the fort has been attacked (successfully) during both World Wars. We didn't know what to expect from this place as had nothing but a set of coordinates. After getting past the front gate the site seemed to be semi-live, looks like an unsuccessful attempt to commercialise the site as a museum and airsoft range. Some modern signs pointing towards canteens and the like were rusted and falling off their hinges, rubbish from shooting related activities was all over the place and some barriers had been vandalised. The main door to the fort interior was locked tight and we very nearly missed a way inside, when we did move the obstacles out of the way and stepped into a long and narrow corridor I think we were all surprised by how much this place kept giving (or at least I was). In the end it went downwards 5 levels, and at the lowest of these there were cable tunnels that went on longer than I could really gauge, I'm thinking several hundred feet. There was also what seemed to be a prison at this lowest level and some defensive structures to allow defenders to shoot down the tunnel, at the end of the tunnels a shaft went directly to the surface and we could hear traffic above us which gave some indication to how far they must have travelled since it was pretty rural and quiet directly around the fort. Looking out through a locked gate. This is half way down the stupidly long cable tunnel, the path zig zags and a defensive position is put in place to fire down towards the exit. The shaft going directly upwards 5 levels at the end of the cable tunnel, ladder rungs have all rusted off. Directions and hallways. Exterior Pre-Metro / Unfinished Subway A poorly planned underground project similar to the one in Antwerp but never built out as much. Presently these tunnels seem to be used as storage for the cities' infrastructure and transport museum. There were some very old vehicles in there and others that were used in years previous. Some form of security system was active down there and we decided not to provoke it too much, further on I understand there to be the foundations for a station. Possibly the oldest carriage down there, sat next-door to a ticket booth. The wall was bricked up behind this and the tunnel u-turns before going deeper. Some really nice old adverts in there too. A warning of surveillance and sure enough, some loud beeping further down this tunnel. Moar tramz. Tons of boxes full of documents and smaller items, this was laid out before we got here, old wind up route signage I guess. University Campus This electrical engineering campus for a University closed in 1977 and students were moved to a more modern spacious site, I've read they're now working on refurbishing it although I'm not sure if it'll still be focussed on it's original subjects. A fire crew pulled up to the building next door alongside 4 fully keyed up people coming into the site during our visit, so I didn't get to see 50% of the place, really nice exteriors as well which are listed. Old Turbine Hall A really nice old turbine hall, built in 1912 to support the surrounding industrial complex which was mostly involved in car building and then railway infrastructure. Some of the turbines and compressors are still in place, no idea how packed the hall was once. Seems to be used rarely for events, the rooms round the back were in worse repair than the main hall, open to the elements in places. Lights switched on along with a lot of noise suddenly so we had to scarper shortly after we had enough daylight to photograph the place. ;/ Ruien Powerplant. Currently being pulled down by a demo team, turbines still mostly intact, the exterior is a bit of a mess and some connecting buildings are half gone. Some workers and forklifts driving through during our short visit, looked quite similar to other ElectraBel plants I've seen although probably the largest turbine hall. Slate Mine I can't recall it's real name :/. A mine with a lot of the tracks and carts still in place, was told it was slate although we only saw a small amount of it down there so probably mixed use. Some other �$%& Getting a bit too pic heavy now, actually have quite a few more worth sharing. But I'm at the limit, so a few (3) shots of other sites: Most of what's left at a power plant for the local steel manufacturing industry. Phone rays. Wevsky's lunch break. Spent some quality time at local steel works, blast furnaces etc, 1 mothballed power station and one in black start (everything ticking along), and some very old glassworks which were interesting (esp the live part ;-)). Thanks Rawski for all the work put into the organisation. And was great to meet Wevsky and Obscurity, fun and manic trip. Cheers for reading.
  21. This was my 1st ever explore. Not sure what the history of the building is or anything unfortunately as it was my wife that suggested going here together (she is so romantic lol). I'm sure this has been done soooooo many times by anyone that lives in the area but I'm really pleased at the photos I got of this place (I took about 200 in total!). I've also done some really nice edits too
  22. This building from the early 20th century is well known, but inside with beautiful decay. So I've visited it two times. In war time used as a military hospital, and later as a spa hotel and recreation home. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  23. This was organised by some great lads who worked it out so we had decent accommodation Very good guides and made the trip worth every penny. The list of names of those present is never ending but Bigjobs and Hils, SX-riffraff where there as where quite a few other bods some of who you know.Cant be doing with a 5 part report documenting the place from start to finish from every location/area we visited so what ive done was narrow it down from just under 900 pics to 130 for Flickr and 30 for here,so there is many many more on my hdd but these will give you a taste of what i did,with a cheeky video of me shooting teh Guns at the end of the trip..Went into Kiev on the last day for a wander about but im not the poke your camera in someones face type especially when hes holding an axe and is wearing a stab vest!! For me this was something id thought about but due to finances never thought id get to see so big shout out to me Mum and the wife for finding the funds,BigJobs as ever was entertaining and at the same time respectful to the wishes of the guides who explained you climb you fuck it for everyone if police see you so it was a chilled affair.I dont mix well with people if i cant speak their lingo so cheers to those who saved me the hassle of trying to order stuff by grabbing me cola while at the bar.. Pics in no particular order as photobucket likes to mess the order i uploaded them.. When the Hdr boys found this room and lined up for their shots the sound of 7 brackets being fired off from them all was quite a deafening sound Thanks for looking and you will be glad to know there is no part 2 or 3 etc ..job done
  24. A nice little relaxed explore. Not that amazing but a few good things left to photograph. History: George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Thanks For Looking!

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