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Found 33 results

  1. This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  2. Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  3. doors and doorways

    Please share your own doors in the comments
  4. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  5. One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/135648593@N02/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  6. Hello everyone. I was refereed to join the forum from the Facebook group. Im from Ohio, USA and have followed urban exploring for a while. Recently I started getting out and doing it myself. I mainly film videos and post them on youtube but I also take pictures when I'm scouting new areas. I was out the other day scouting an area and took some pictures. I'm looking forward to going back.
  7. When I got my fisheye, and as I am from Norfolk one of the first photos I took with it was a tractor! I was quite pleased with the results so I thought I would have a wander about this site. All are processed from 3 handheld bracketed images. I know a bit lazy. Sorry there seems to be a bit of a formula to the images but I hope you enjoy. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  8. Now then. Recently Maniac, Frosty and I went out for a spot of Dover derping and this is "wot we done" South trollands #1: Troll mills west: Thanks to the guys for an entertaining evening out, and thanks to you for looking in, R. Jewson
  9. Better known as GKN Screw factory in the heart of the ever lovurley Brum splored with PS as always a brilliant adventure exploring the rat run of never ending tunnels under neath her...highlight of the day was with out a doubt turning roung and seeing a monkey dangling off a rope and even more so PS knocking him self out..yip! And Finally the Swinging Monkey
  10. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and then in 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street. They had by this time also increased their product range to include steel files and shoe & butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd.
  11. Intresting place this,not huge for a hospital,and a little trashed in some parts....tripped a siolent alarm and secca booted me off,but they were sound...no externals im affraid,as i had to leave sharpish... Thanks for looking...
  12. A nice Sunday spend having a wander round the Potteries of stoke...a selection of my pics from..Ainsleys..Wetherbys and Tam Crown Works..all interesting sites with bits and bobs left behind..for some reason i have no externals aplolgies for that..on with the pics..
  13. Explored with 2 non members Hubberstone Fort Scoverton Fort
  14. Explored with 2 non members Well this was a fun explore, we didn't know which building it was so we ended up walking around the entire site getting zapped by electric fences which was hilarious to say the least and almost eaten by horses in the neighbouring field before getting in touch with NK who was kind enough to point us in the right direction, all in all it was a good laugh
  15. A revisit was in order with Obscurity,Fortknox0 and frosty and this time Space Invader joined us for a look around This is looking back along the Arp (tower hamlets tunnel) just before lagoon caves Section leading to the tower hamlets tunnel from the lagoon caves Now a few from in lagoon caves Toilet block at the end of the caves Back into the main tunnel looking towards the bricked wall just before the builders rubbish blockage Another toilet block in beaufoy’s caves Looking down just after the long crawl over broken shower doors and rotten wood Now sealed passage into the workshop area beyond this was obviously still in use That was that nice to visit the place again!!
  16. Well we were very disappointed with this mine due to not having our 4gas meter..... all i will say is if you go in FFS take a meter 30 yards in we could not breath hardly and that was just walking, the mine had NO air flow at all..... time for the pics first the beach with the fossils within the mine next time we go it will be with a meter and i hope better air..... if you go in please be careful ....death awaits !...
  17. UK Bolton stone mines and quarry 2011

    This was our second visit to this area, i have no history on this place all i can tell you is it is a stone quarry with 4 stone mines within the faces, there was a rail line within the quarry which went down hill to the railway for off loading there stone. on with the pics. 2 of the ways in woot. A reet nice 'miners deads' wall hope you liked the pic's ill see what info i can dig up, to be honest im mowed under with work
  18. Being right on are door step and hearing of plans to try and open them to the public we decided a local explore was in order ... visited with wevsky obscurity and frosty .. a little history.. The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route.The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels.Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. on with the pics... THE WESTCLIFF SECTION visited with obscurity ... The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system.There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty.There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. thanks for looking
  19. Hmmmmm after looking inside the Childrens Hospital Inside and out (now converted to a asian building) so nothing left at all in there...we headed over the road to St Catherines Hospital (for Cancer and Incurables), very easy access to this well nice place but no nice machinery left only Ooozzing with pealed paint !. within the cellar
  20. About 5 years ago i heard of this tunnel in a small village a couple of miles away from me. And subsequently went and had a look for myself. Sadly at the time i didn't take a camera, or do much of a report. So 5 years later decided to go back, more to play, but hey ho thought il do a report while i was at. So a little bit of history: Burham works were established around 1850 by Thomas Cubitt. He built the east front of Buckingham Palace, and constructed three thousand feet of the Thames Embankment. Cubitt’s success was due to his then revolutionary method of employing vast numbers of craftsmen as a team under his direct control rather than dealing with independent tradesmen. This enabled him to build a reputation for meeting deadlines on time and on budget. Cubitt set up the Burham works towards the end of his life in order to provide a guaranteed supply of good quality bricks. It was one of many works along the banks of the Medway, in which Halling cement works was the last remaining in the area. All that remains of this and many other cement works is the pits and one long tunnel roughly 750m long. There are rumours that the majority of the pits had tunnels, and that they were used as air raid shelters during the war. This tunnel was dug to access a large chalk pit dug into the hillside below Bluebell Hill. The tunnel was hand dug, with a brick lined roof. The pits supplied chalk to APCM's Burham Cement Works which commenced making Portland cement in 1854 and ceased operation in 1938. After the pit had closed in 1938, the pit into which the tunnel leads was used by the army during WWII as a firing range and grenade range. After the war ended, the pit lay empty. Except for some locals using it to race bikes, and posiable cars. The small train that used to work in the quarry. The pit today The north portal Into the depths The original sleepers The 1st blocked passage The 2nd blocked passage, which used to be a ventilation shaft The other ventalation shaft And finally play time! Sorry about amount of pictures, tried to make it interesting, i know its been done before, but i like this tunnel.
  21. Nortel acquired the Harlow laboratories, originally Standard Telecommunications Laboratories, in 1991 and continued to use the site for research and development in wireless telecommunication technologies. It was the site of Charles Kao's research in fibre optic communications. This is their employees sports and social club The Nortel Sports Club trophy cabinet, very similar to the Arsenal trophy cabinet due to the fact that they are both empty!!!
  22. In January 1995 a small group of enthusiasts, brought together by their recognition of the rapidly approaching end of an era in travel around South London, formed a group to preserve examples of the EPB type trains. For nearly half a century these electric multiple units reliably carried millions of passengers over the Southern Electric network. The EPB Preservation Group (Company Limited by guarantee from December 1998) was born. In mid 1995 we bought BR Standard design 2 EPB [Electro Pneumatic Brake] Unit 5759 which was built at Eastleigh in 1956. It lasted until nearly the end of EPB operation being withdrawn from service on 18th January 1995. Our volunteers are now working at Shepherdswell, its home on the East Kent Railway, to restore 5759 to as near early 1960s condition as practicable. a few of the Goliath tunnel Thanks for looking
  23. Thornton Imperial Chinese Restaurant On the way back home from my visit at Thornton Cemetery I shot past this until my brain kicked in gear and registered it as a derelict building tucked at the side of the road. So camera and gear ready off I whet for my quarry..... May I take your order Sir !!!... The next Chinese picture to me is just stunning. Time for a quick drink !... Not only did they work here but there are living quarters too.......
  24. I visited this hospital in December 2010 and enjoyed it so much that I returned in January 2011 to explore some more!! Highwood Hospital was designed by Charles and William Henman who were commissioned by the Metropolitan Asylums Board to provide medical and social conditions for poor children suffering from ophthalmia (A contagious eye condition) Highwood was opened on 26 July 1904 and could accommodate 350 children. Highwood Hospital 1965 In 1914, following the outbreak of the First World War, the hospital site was loaned to the War Office and from 1918 to 1919 it was briefly used for sane epileptics. It was then used to treat children suffering from tuberculosis (TB) and rheumatic diseases. London County Council took control of the site in 1930 and they made a number of improvements to the buildings including the addition of sun balconies to the patients’ blocks to provide suitable open air treatment of patients. Highwood Hospital is a rare surviving example of the cottage home system. Although changes have been made to the buildings over time, at present, the character of Highwood’s origin still remains. Many of the house cottage groups are still together and larger individual buildings still retain many architectural features Modern History The Hospital site had been made a conservation area in 2001 and closed little by little over the years as services moved to other hospitals in the area. Highwood finally closed it's doors in 2009 and the 17 acre site was sold to Bellway Homes who plan to build over 200 homes. Thanks for looking
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