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Found 24 results

  1. Hello everyone. I was refereed to join the forum from the Facebook group. Im from Ohio, USA and have followed urban exploring for a while. Recently I started getting out and doing it myself. I mainly film videos and post them on youtube but I also take pictures when I'm scouting new areas. I was out the other day scouting an area and took some pictures. I'm looking forward to going back.
  2. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and then in 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street. They had by this time also increased their product range to include steel files and shoe & butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd.
  3. Intresting place this,not huge for a hospital,and a little trashed in some parts....tripped a siolent alarm and secca booted me off,but they were sound...no externals im affraid,as i had to leave sharpish... Thanks for looking...
  4. A nice Sunday spend having a wander round the Potteries of stoke...a selection of my pics from..Ainsleys..Wetherbys and Tam Crown Works..all interesting sites with bits and bobs left behind..for some reason i have no externals aplolgies for that..on with the pics..
  5. Explored with 2 non members Hubberstone Fort Scoverton Fort
  6. Explored with 2 non members Well this was a fun explore, we didn't know which building it was so we ended up walking around the entire site getting zapped by electric fences which was hilarious to say the least and almost eaten by horses in the neighbouring field before getting in touch with NK who was kind enough to point us in the right direction, all in all it was a good laugh
  7. A revisit was in order with Obscurity,Fortknox0 and frosty and this time Space Invader joined us for a look around This is looking back along the Arp (tower hamlets tunnel) just before lagoon caves Section leading to the tower hamlets tunnel from the lagoon caves Now a few from in lagoon caves Toilet block at the end of the caves Back into the main tunnel looking towards the bricked wall just before the builders rubbish blockage Another toilet block in beaufoy’s caves Looking down just after the long crawl over broken shower doors and rotten wood Now sealed passage into the workshop area beyond this was obviously still in use That was that nice to visit the place again!!
  8. Well we were very disappointed with this mine due to not having our 4gas meter..... all i will say is if you go in FFS take a meter 30 yards in we could not breath hardly and that was just walking, the mine had NO air flow at all..... time for the pics first the beach with the fossils within the mine next time we go it will be with a meter and i hope better air..... if you go in please be careful ....death awaits !...
  9. UK Bolton stone mines and quarry 2011

    This was our second visit to this area, i have no history on this place all i can tell you is it is a stone quarry with 4 stone mines within the faces, there was a rail line within the quarry which went down hill to the railway for off loading there stone. on with the pics. 2 of the ways in woot. A reet nice 'miners deads' wall hope you liked the pic's ill see what info i can dig up, to be honest im mowed under with work
  10. Being right on are door step and hearing of plans to try and open them to the public we decided a local explore was in order ... visited with wevsky obscurity and frosty .. a little history.. The town's borough engineer and surveyor R.D. Brimmell conceived and planned a scheme for tunneling galleries out of the chalk. This was similar to the only other known network of deep shelters in Barcelona that Spain built during the Spanish civil war. Following Hitler's seizure of Austria in 1938 Brimmell put his proposals before the town council for submission to the Home Office for approval. The plan was rejected on the grounds that it was "premature". Following Munich, the council approached the Home Office a second time but were again turned down. In the spring of 1939 when Hitler walked into Czechoslovakia, the council made a third appeal to the Home Office who relented and excavations began. By the outbreak of war, work was nearing completion on what was to become one of the most extensive network of deep air-raid shelters anywhere in the country. Plans were soon in hand to incorporate both the standard gauge and narrow gauge tunnels in to the shelter network. The tunnels would be linked to a further 3.25 miles of new tunnels skirting the town in a semi-circular route.The contract for this immense undertaking was awarded to Francois Cementation Co. Ltd., at a cost of £40,383 with an additional £13,481 for seating, lighting, chemical toilets and the costs of converting the existing tunnels.Work proceeded night and day and the first section of the network between West Harbour and Queen Street was opened by the Duke of Kent on 1st June 1939 with the contract due to be completed by the end of that year. As each new section of tunnel was opened it received it's allocation of local people with strict regulations enforced; smoking was forbidden and pets and prams were not allowed underground. The first section opened had batteries and a generator but the rest of the tunnels had to rely on the town supply, which was at times erratic. Eventually the council provided 200 hurricane lamps. There was also a system of loudspeakers to relay wireless programmes and announcements. on with the pics... THE WESTCLIFF SECTION visited with obscurity ... The tunnels ran at a depth of 50 to 90 feet, following the line of existing roads wherever possible. For most of its length they were unsupported and un-lined but the entrance tunnels close to the surface and a few short sections through unstable ground were lined with reinforced concrete. For most of their length the new tunnels were 6' wide by 7' high with toilet recesses fitted with curtains at 75 foot intervals and a first aid post every 1000 feet. There were ten ventilation shafts throughout the system.There was seating for 35,000 but the shelter was expected to hold 60,000 without difficulty.There were numerous spur tunnels serving 10 entrances located mainly in public parks and open spaces, (one of them at Vale Square was filled in before the shelter opened as the area was well served by two other entrances) with an 11th entrance in the hospital as a quick route for taking patients down from the wards and casualties up into the hospital. thanks for looking
  11. Hmmmmm after looking inside the Childrens Hospital Inside and out (now converted to a asian building) so nothing left at all in there...we headed over the road to St Catherines Hospital (for Cancer and Incurables), very easy access to this well nice place but no nice machinery left only Ooozzing with pealed paint !. within the cellar
  12. About 5 years ago i heard of this tunnel in a small village a couple of miles away from me. And subsequently went and had a look for myself. Sadly at the time i didn't take a camera, or do much of a report. So 5 years later decided to go back, more to play, but hey ho thought il do a report while i was at. So a little bit of history: Burham works were established around 1850 by Thomas Cubitt. He built the east front of Buckingham Palace, and constructed three thousand feet of the Thames Embankment. Cubitt’s success was due to his then revolutionary method of employing vast numbers of craftsmen as a team under his direct control rather than dealing with independent tradesmen. This enabled him to build a reputation for meeting deadlines on time and on budget. Cubitt set up the Burham works towards the end of his life in order to provide a guaranteed supply of good quality bricks. It was one of many works along the banks of the Medway, in which Halling cement works was the last remaining in the area. All that remains of this and many other cement works is the pits and one long tunnel roughly 750m long. There are rumours that the majority of the pits had tunnels, and that they were used as air raid shelters during the war. This tunnel was dug to access a large chalk pit dug into the hillside below Bluebell Hill. The tunnel was hand dug, with a brick lined roof. The pits supplied chalk to APCM's Burham Cement Works which commenced making Portland cement in 1854 and ceased operation in 1938. After the pit had closed in 1938, the pit into which the tunnel leads was used by the army during WWII as a firing range and grenade range. After the war ended, the pit lay empty. Except for some locals using it to race bikes, and posiable cars. The small train that used to work in the quarry. The pit today The north portal Into the depths The original sleepers The 1st blocked passage The 2nd blocked passage, which used to be a ventilation shaft The other ventalation shaft And finally play time! Sorry about amount of pictures, tried to make it interesting, i know its been done before, but i like this tunnel.
  13. Nortel acquired the Harlow laboratories, originally Standard Telecommunications Laboratories, in 1991 and continued to use the site for research and development in wireless telecommunication technologies. It was the site of Charles Kao's research in fibre optic communications. This is their employees sports and social club The Nortel Sports Club trophy cabinet, very similar to the Arsenal trophy cabinet due to the fact that they are both empty!!!
  14. In January 1995 a small group of enthusiasts, brought together by their recognition of the rapidly approaching end of an era in travel around South London, formed a group to preserve examples of the EPB type trains. For nearly half a century these electric multiple units reliably carried millions of passengers over the Southern Electric network. The EPB Preservation Group (Company Limited by guarantee from December 1998) was born. In mid 1995 we bought BR Standard design 2 EPB [Electro Pneumatic Brake] Unit 5759 which was built at Eastleigh in 1956. It lasted until nearly the end of EPB operation being withdrawn from service on 18th January 1995. Our volunteers are now working at Shepherdswell, its home on the East Kent Railway, to restore 5759 to as near early 1960s condition as practicable. a few of the Goliath tunnel Thanks for looking
  15. Thornton Imperial Chinese Restaurant On the way back home from my visit at Thornton Cemetery I shot past this until my brain kicked in gear and registered it as a derelict building tucked at the side of the road. So camera and gear ready off I whet for my quarry..... May I take your order Sir !!!... The next Chinese picture to me is just stunning. Time for a quick drink !... Not only did they work here but there are living quarters too.......
  16. I visited this hospital in December 2010 and enjoyed it so much that I returned in January 2011 to explore some more!! Highwood Hospital was designed by Charles and William Henman who were commissioned by the Metropolitan Asylums Board to provide medical and social conditions for poor children suffering from ophthalmia (A contagious eye condition) Highwood was opened on 26 July 1904 and could accommodate 350 children. Highwood Hospital 1965 In 1914, following the outbreak of the First World War, the hospital site was loaned to the War Office and from 1918 to 1919 it was briefly used for sane epileptics. It was then used to treat children suffering from tuberculosis (TB) and rheumatic diseases. London County Council took control of the site in 1930 and they made a number of improvements to the buildings including the addition of sun balconies to the patients’ blocks to provide suitable open air treatment of patients. Highwood Hospital is a rare surviving example of the cottage home system. Although changes have been made to the buildings over time, at present, the character of Highwood’s origin still remains. Many of the house cottage groups are still together and larger individual buildings still retain many architectural features Modern History The Hospital site had been made a conservation area in 2001 and closed little by little over the years as services moved to other hospitals in the area. Highwood finally closed it's doors in 2009 and the 17 acre site was sold to Bellway Homes who plan to build over 200 homes. Thanks for looking
  17. Right its somehting ive been meaning to have a look at and know i have im glad i did..visited with paulk silver rainbow and space invader History has been covered a few time so im simply gunna put a link up to a site which covers it ! http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/site ... ndex.shtml And a few of the trains before my battery died ..skool boy error didnt check if i was charged up.. And just for shitz and giggles one pic of an orb ! Was a good explore and damn cold thanks for looking!
  18. Right not going into the history of the place as its been quite nicely reported on other sites ..this is an arp that has a tunnel joining the 2 aforementioned caves,entrance is Amusing as ever,hats off to the guys who more recently went down ! It cant be said that its laid undiscovered as some parts are obviously still in use,just not visited by any urbex! It was visited with knox obs and frosty ..battered and bruised in places but a good night out anyways! Right as it goes was a good explore way too much clambering around involved and not unlike other arp's but worth the cold night out,thanks for looking
  19. Right the evening was arranged by Obscurity and myslef Frosty Mr Fro joined him for a wander round southforelands ,the original plan being to visit both shelters both plotting rooms and the 4 magazines,as it happens we did the first set and decided to go elsewhere!headed onto oil mills west where i didnt take my camera as ive allready posted a report!Thx to mr fro for the helping hand up that ruddy wall!Next we had a wander round the path over looking the port for some night shots then decided to go to the Archcliffe galleries,the cells next door can still be done but even tighter squeeze that the galleries so we called it quites there.. Now excuse lack of technical info on the sites but Tbh there isnt much i can tell you guys that you dont allready know!! Right heres the pics someones been making themselves feel at home down here On to the shelter Few Of the plotting room.. Must say out of all the deep shelters ive visited this one as with the 2nd shelter ive been told are pretty small in comparison! On to Archcliffe Galleries Right sorry bout the write not being that factual ,but its a well reported couple of sites im just happy to have got round them!!
  20. Right wasnt gunna do this post cos the main bit we went to see st matrins kinda placed obsticles for my 2 friends i got in but as they couldnt i ended up coming out again visited a place in folkstone the name of which escapes me cos i was in the back of van..2nd spot we visited was given info from a local..bit naff as it was just a staircase leading down a tunnel to a small room with an exit at end of,i personanly do not like heights cliff edges nor the 45 degree angles and narrow pathways leading in and out so my arse was flapping to the point i may have shouted "i want my mummy"..did it tho and if anyones recognsies the tunnel and knows about it do tell..right not many pics so short report Right this is inside the gate at st martins these few are inside the tunneled staircase And heres some from inside the shelter at folkestone all flash im afraid was fealing way too ill to spend much more time out
  21. More of an organsied visit than an explore. I had seen the Catacombs on Cities of the Underworld on the History Channel and had always wanted to go and seen them in person. Brief History taken form Wikipedia: The cemetery was built on the site of the ancient Great North Wood, from which Norwood took its name. Although many trees had been cleared, a number of mature specimens were included in Tite's original landscaping. A tree survey of the cemetery in 2005 identified one oak which is thought to date from 1540-1640. Fourteen more oaks, a maple and an ash tree were identified that predate the foundation of the cemetery in 1836. In the first years of the cemetery's operation, these were joined by coniferous trees and evergreen holm oaks. The site originally included two Gothic chapels at the crest of the hill, but these were badly damaged by bombing during World War II. The Dissenter's chapel was rebuilt as a Crematorium while the Episcopal chapel was levelled, to be replaced by a memorial garden over its crypt. In 1842 a section of the cemetery was acquired by London's Greek community for a Greek Orthodox cemetery, and this soon filled with many fine monuments and large mausoleums. Grade II*-listed St Stephen's Chapel within the Greek section is attributed to architect John Oldrid Scott. Another section in the south-east corner was acquired by St Mary-at-Hill in the City of London for its own parish burials. Between 1978 and 1993 the cemetery achieved several levels of official recognition by being included in the West Norwood Conservation Area, while the entrance arch, the fine railings and 64 monuments were listed as Grade II and II* - more listed monuments than any other cemetery. However, space for new burials ran out in the inter-war years, and, deprived of this regular source of income, the cemetery company was unable to properly afford its upkeep. Lambeth Council compulsorily purchased the cemetery in 1965, and controversially claimed ownership over existing graves. Lambeth changed some of the character of the grounds through "lawn conversion", removing at least 10,000 monuments (including some of the listed monuments) and restarted new burials by re-using plots. Southwark Diocesan Consistory Court cases in 1991 and 1995 found this to be illegal and brought about the cessation of new burials, and forced the restoration of a handful of the damaged or removed monuments. In addition it required Lambeth to publish an index of cleared plots so that the current entitled owners can request restitution. As a consequence of the courts' findings Lambeth now operates the cemetery in accordance with a scheme of management under the joint control of all interested parties that includes Lambeth, the Diocese, the local Friends of West Norwood Cemetery and conservation bodies such as English Heritage. Notable interments taken form Wikipedia More than 200 people in the cemetery are recorded in the Dictionary of National Biography. The Friends of West Norwood Cemetery have recorded and compiled biographies for many more of these with: * a large number of inventors, engineers, architects, and builders, such as Sir Hiram Maxim, inventor of the automatic machine gun, Sir Henry Bessemer, engineer and inventor of the famous steel process, James Henry Greathead who tunnelled much of the London Underground, William Burges and Sir William Tite, gothic architects * many artists and entertainers, including: David Roberts, artist, William Collingwood Smith, painter, Joseph Barnby, composer and resident conductor at the Royal Albert Hall, Katti Lanner, ballet dancer, and actors E. J. Lonnen, Patsy Smart, and Mary Brough. * many notable medics, such as: Dr William Marsden, founder of the Royal Free Hospital and The Royal Marsden Hospital, Dr Gideon Mantell, the geologist and pioneering palaeontologist, and Sister Eliza Roberts, (Florence Nightingale's principal nurse during the Crimean War) * many sportsmen, including C. W. Alcock, founder of Test cricket and the FA Cup, Georg Hackenschmidt, Anglo-Estonian professional wrestler. There are also the 'Great and the Good' of the time, such as Sir Henry Tate, sugar magnate and founder of London's Tate Gallery, Paul Julius Baron von Reuter, founder of the news agency, and the Revd. Charles Spurgeon, Baptist preacher, Isabella Beeton (the famous cookery writer), who died at 29 in childbirth, to name but a few. The Greek diaspora is well represented, including the Ralli family, Panayis Vagliano, Rodocanachi family, and Princess Eugenie Palaeologue Useful link http://www.fownc.org/ (Our guide for the day also writes on this site) It was a truly amazing site, but creepy at times, especially when I came across a coffin from the early nineties in the catacombs that still had the remains of the flowers that had been put there by the mourners. Anyway on with the pics The crest on the main gate mentions connections to Canterbury Some of the monuments Now for the catacombs The Coffin lift (The chapel above has been flatterned and replaced by a rose garden, There are plans to replace the chapel) The Arms of the Catacombs Looking into one of the sealed Catacombs And then you turn a corner and come across these This was the creepiest one for me. These are the remains of flowers left on top of a coffin from the early nineties, Thanks for looking
  22. Explored with solar p in quite a bad state but made for some cool pictures the barn in to the house
  23. the upper and lower oil mills are a horse shoue shape and have had many usages built before 19th century they were used to store oil in and as air rade shelters in the war this report is for both upper and lower as i took so many pictures i cant differetiate between them guestbook
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