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Found 6 results

  1. Another one of those that I've been wanting to do for years, It became common knowledge as to where the entrance was and after a tip off I thought it was high time I paid this last section a visit ! A little history about the Ramsgate ARP tunnel network; The design and construction of the tunnels was masterminded by the Borough Engineer Mr. R.D. Brimmell B.Sc. A.M.I.C.E. as early as 1938, but was repeatedly turned down by the Home Office. Ramsgate's flamboyant Mayor of the time A.B.C. Kempe kept the pressure on, and with the increasing intensity of the war in Europe permission to start construction was given in the Spring of 1939. Work started immediately at a cost of just over £40,000 plus a further £13,500 for services and fittings. The first section between Queen Street and the Harbour was opened by the Duke of Kent on the 1st June 1939. The tunnels were 6 feet wide, 7 feet high and constructed at a depth of 50-75 feet to provide an adequate degree of protection against random bombing with 500 lb. and 1000 lb. medium capacity bombs. In the case of a direct hit, a 500 lb. bomb would not be expected to damage the tunnel; but some spalling (splintering) of the chalk would be expected if the bomb was a 1000 lb. medium capacity type and the overhead cover was less than 60 feet. After the end of World War II a large sewer pipe was installed in part of the system under Ellington Road and continued down to the Harbour. The remaining entrances were sealed and the tunnels began to fall into disrepair. And some of my pics from the visit On the 24th August 1940 Ramsgate received more than 500 bombs when a squadron of German aircraft were approaching Manston. Their leading aircraft was shot down over the harbour and in vengeance they decided to release their bombs over Ramsgate. This was the first air raid by the Germans on an unprotected town. On that fateful occasion countless lives were saved by an underground Air Raid Protection (A.R.P.) system of tunnels dug for the purpose. These tunnels extended for approximately 2½ miles around the town with 11 entrances at strategic points providing refuge within 5 minutes walk of most areas. A 1500 yard long former railway tunnel was also used and linked to the A.R.P. system. The tunnels were equipped with chemical toilets, bunk beds, seating, lighting and a loud speaker system. Many people took up residence below ground having lost their homes above. Others used them just for shelter or to move around town during a raid. And finally a nice bit of original Graff that I spotted despite running around muttering expletives like a loon A fantastic night had by all, thanks for checking out my Pics !
  2. I have held out on this for a very long time trying to find history "Just that little bit different", But failed miserably, Theres lots out there referring to title deeds, Access rights under peoples gardens etc but no real history about who built it and when, When construction started and when it was finalized etc. Visited with a very good friend of mine who despite much nagging still hasn't joined up on here , Anyways enough of my drivel on with some pics And thats all folks, Thanks for browsing through my piccies
  3. Noahs ark arp tunnel explored with SilverFox late one night on a return trip from folkestone. Have to apologize for lack of tunnel shots the ols camera wasnt really up to the job. Bit of history pinched from Subterranean History This tunnel was originally dug to carry a water main, but extended at the beginning of WW2 to provide shelter for over 800 people in the Tower Hamlets and Combe Valley areas of Dover. It runs straight into the hillside behind Noah's Ark Road and slopes gently down to Combe Valley, with a total length of over 1,000 feet. It is concrete lined throughout with blast walls near the entrances and rows of toilet cubicles in recesses off the main tunnel. The tunnel does not seem to have had many recent visitors, and is therefore in a clean condition and there is interesting WW2 graffiti to be seen. And now some pics... Thanks for looking
  4. Noahs Ark ARP Tunnel, Visited with Space Invader One sunny Saturday Afternoon, History borrowed from Underground Kent Noah’s Ark Tunnel in Dover is a passageway through the hill in a downwards slope towards Union Road. It’s precise date of construction and purpose is not clear, although early plans suggest it could have been used as a water main. It was certainly in place by the advent of the Second World War, during which time it was converted into an air raid shelter. It was concrete lined at this time and the evidence of toilets can still be found through the length of the tunnel, along with a kitchen area and blast walls at regular intervals. The tunnel is approximately 335 metres (1105 feet) long, 2 metres (6 feet) high and 1.5 metres (almost 5 feet) wide. The kitchen area is wider than this. There is a great deal of wartime graffiti in the tunnel, including names and dates as well as drawings of aeroplanes, ships and submarine. On with some pics Some original wartime Graffiti And time for a bit of experimentation The obligatory Scooter, or whats left of it Thanks for looking
  5. At Tower Hamlets of Dover lies a system of tunnels forgotten for years. Over the last few years its secrets have been uncovered. This is an excellent example of one of Dover’s many WW2 ARP shelters. Parts of the tunnels have now been separated and are now used for storage by various shops above. Was good to finally tick this one off the list.
  6. UK Noahs Ark ARP Tunnel 2010

    %This tunnel was dug at the beginning of WW2 to provide shelter for over 800 people in the Tower Hamlets and Combe Valley areas of Dover. It runs straight into the hillside behind Noah's Ark Road and slopes gently down to Combe Valley, with a total length of over 1,000 feet. It is concrete lined throughout with blast walls near the entrances and rows of toilet cubicles in recesses off the main tunnel ttp://i780.photobucket.com/albums/yy83/unclebulgaria/noahs%20ark/DSC02024.jpg http://i780.photobucket.com/albums/yy83/unclebulgaria/noahs%20ark/DSC02033.jpg
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