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Found 147 results

  1. During a Italian trip waaaay back in 2016, I visited this rather lovely Manicomio in the heart of a seaside Italian City, it was impressive to say the least. Huge stairs, huge windows, high ceilings, but sadly rather empty, but I enjoyed it enough to go back this year with Baroness Von DerpBangers. Thanks for looking
  2. Belgium Shutter Island August '17

    At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  3. USA Kentucky Mental Hospital Power Plant

    This ominous building once served as the power plant for the Central State Mental Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  4. A bit of history: Sunnyside Royal hospital was a psychiatric hospital founded in 1781 located in Hillside, Scotland. The hospital was originally founded as the Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary & Dispensary by Susan Carnegie. In 1858, a new improved asylum was completed in the village of Hillside on lands of the farm of Sunnyside and the old site was vacated. The site was further developed adding a new facility for private patients called Carnegie House in 1899. Despite this addition, overcrowding was a problem, as the asylum's patient numbers had grown to 670 by 1900 leading to additional building work to be undertaken. Two new buildings were added to the facility and additional staff were required to care for the additional patients. A further development was the addition of Angus House, which was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia. After the 1946 National Health Service act brought the hospital under the control of the Eastern Regional Hospital Board, the name changed from the Royal Asylum of Montrose to the Royal Mental Hospital of Montrose. In 1962 it became Sunnyside Royal Hospital and came under the jurisdiction of new management. The site was officially closed in late 2011 after being open for 230 years and most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital. The Explore: Its not often we venture north of the wall so we didn't arrive at the location until after dark and the by that time the weather had taken a turn for the worse. This was the last stop of the day after a gruelling 03:30 set off and was to act as base camp before the crazy drive home in the morning, After wandering around in the rain for a while we managed entry and began the explore. After a very short walk we decided we found the best spot to set up, nothing to do with no one daring to explore further.... After what was possibly the worst nights sleep ever we took advantage of the morning light and began wandering. The place definitely had a much safer feel to it and has to be the best asylum I am probably going to see for a very long while. Explored with @-Raz-, @Hydro and another friend not on OS. Cheers for looking!!
  5. History High Royds Hospital (formerly known as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum) first opened on the 8th October 1888. The main purpose of the asylum was to contain and restrain mentally ill patients. People often spent decades imprisoned in the asylum, which was recognized in the High Royds Cemetery which stands as a testament to those who spent their last days there. People lived very repetitive and lonely lives in the asylum due to poor care and understanding of mental illness in the 19th century, and it was common for people to be admitted for minor mental illnesses, such as phobias, anxiety and learning disabilities. The asylum was given the name Menston Mental Hospital in the 1920's, (and eventually became High Royds Asylum in 1963), and cures for mental illness were considered as an alternative to simply storing patients. The use of shock therapy was introduced with the intention of putting patients into a relaxed mental state, however this resulted in many patients screaming in pain, and sometimes caused them to become unconscious. Lobotomy was also a popular treatment at High Royds around this time. The hospital was closed in 2003 because it had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. The site is now being redeveloped into a new village, and all that remains is the admin block, which is grade II listed. Some features of the hospital will remain, such as the clock tower and ballroom. I've been here a few times so the photos are from various trips. I only ever got to see the Admin block but it was worth it for the clock tower and ballroom which I'm glad they're keeping. Explored with @plod and a few others. Sadly this place is now a no-go, I think its safe to assume somebody had been caught by the residents which brought attention to the access point, as they always seem to have their eyes out. I'm glad I at least got to see the last little bit that was left while it still stands though.
  6. Severalls Hospital (also known as the Second Essex County Asylum and Severalls Mental Hospital) was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 in Colchester. The 300-acre site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. I don't generally post reports from old trips but nobody has posted a report from here for ages so why not, it's a classic! The first time I went we spent 4 hours inside before being busted by a Gurkha just as we were leaving. He was a smily chap who didn't speak much English, I gave my name as Robert Palmer and sang him a quick rendition of my hit 'Addicted to love' before he let us out and told us to "come back and try again tomorrow" with a cheeky wink. I returned a couple of weeks later and this time we managed 7 hours unseen and saw a fair bit of the site. There isn't much stuff left behind but the long corridors and 20 odd years of natural decay are really photogenic in places. The site is now apparently being prepped for initial demolition, all the trees have gone and there is new security in place so my advice is to get down there soon if you want to see it before it goes. Asylums will soon be a thing of the past.... 1. The front of the admin building 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Squirrels Boutique was the hospital tuck shop 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. This was where the main hall existed before it was destroyed in a fire and demolished in 2007 26. More fire damage, the beams on the ceiling stood out in the shape of a crucifix from this angle 27. 28. Some externals 29. 30. Thanks for looking
  7. History A bit of a mish mash as I couldn't find much just on the Chapel but this is what I did find. After its closure, the land of the former Hospital was purchased for residential development by Bloor Homes. It was sold off to various other developers such as Redrow, Barratt, Harron Homes, Wimpey and PJ Livesey although Bloor’s were the major house builder for the new Wadsley Park estate which was constructed on the site of the old hospital. The Wadsley Park village consists of a mixture of houses and apartments of various sizes. Some of the old hospital structures were designated as listed buildings, the main admin block (the clock tower), Kingswood ward, the church and the porters lodge were all grade II listed and could not be demolished with the rest of the hospital. The administration building and clock tower were converted into 38 luxury apartments by Urbani after permission to demolish the building was denied and the building is now known as Middlewood Lodge. The Kingswood ward has been converted into 85 apartments by developers PJ Livesey and is known as Kingswood Hall. The porter's lodge on Middlewood Road has been refurbished and is now a nursery. The hospital church has been derelict for many years, it held its last service on 6 November 1996 to mark the closure of the hospital. In March 2012 plans were submitted by architectural design consultancy Coda Studios that may see the imposing Victorian church converted into a mixture of town houses and apartments. The scheme which needs approval from Sheffield City Council also contains proposals for a selection of partially underground eco-friendly bungalows beneath the building. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger , we had allready been on one explore in Sheffield and were running out of daylight hours so needed one that wasn't going to take long. I had seen the post @Paulpowers had posted on this little chapel and liked the look of it. Not much left to it really but what I did see was nice. The initial thought I had when seeing it was it looked like a really gloomy church. Almost hidden beneath greenery you could see the spire and top poking out as we approached. Entry was relatively easy. The ground had been dug out inside with channels in between each Column. I am assuming they do this to see what the foundations are like. Actually I didn't assume this. HT told me and I just thought it would make me a little more intelligent haha! The structure is pretty sound, quite sad to see how much graf and vandalism this place has had. It's always quite sad to see someone deface the 'house of god'. Not that I am religious or anything but more respectful if anything. There are some wonderful stained glass windows in here, especially the one which was placed in there just after World War II. Anyway, not much left to say on this place. 1: The Exterior 2: The inside looking back from the Altar 3: 4: 5: The right Transept windows 6: The remains of the Organ 7: The Original flooring, mostly covered in Pigeon Shit 8: One of the few remaining Stained Glass windows 9: The part I liked the most, still 100% intact too. A little slice of history
  8. St. John's Asylum The Explore.. Visited with @Urbexbandoned. Thought we should really check this place out last year in October as there hadn't been anything from the place for ages, mainly due to people probably assuming the place was converted, but in reality you can see from the main road that there is a large proportion still derelict. At a guess I'd say 70-80% of it. The chapel at the front is now swanky apartments and the main frontage has been repaired and to be fair looks pretty good as the original architecture has all been retained. Some new build houses have appeared and other sections to the left are now townhouses and apartments. Still quite a bit to see but one thing I did notice was some areas that were pretty intact 18 months ago have had floor/roof collapses and are a bit of a death trap now. Some of the corridors that were previously accessible are now bricked up and some of the areas that weren't have now become viewable thanks to the conversion in progress. I considered venturing through into the converted areas to get some snaps but decided it'd be a lot easier just to look on right Rightmove rather than bump into the onsite (and quite on the ball) security In and out undetected which is always nice as the current secca policy I've heard is to call the cops from the police station across the road, and ask questions later.. They now have dogs there too... The History. Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960's it was known as St John's Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main buildings. The Pictures.. 1. 2. 3/4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9/10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17/18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24/25. 26. The area where they are stripping walls and floors back to bare brick for the conversion.. As always, thanks for looking and feedback appreciated
  9. A little bit of history on another place I'm sure you've all seen plenty before - The 300-acre (120 ha) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. A few of the satellite villas as of 2013 are still operational as research facilities on the edge of the site. (Copied from Wikipedia, though loads of info on the hospital to be found here too- http://severallshospital.co.uk/#/home-page/4531049539 Annd the explore - Explored again with TheVampiricSquid and a couple other explorers. After a reluctant 4am start, (cheers to thevampiricsquid for letting me crash at his, I'm not sure how I would have fared if I'd had to do that extra bit of driving in the morning!) helped by the downing of energy drinks and a stop at maccie's we finally made it over to essex to meet the others just as daylight came creeping in. Over the quite frankly evil fence we went, and off to the main building. Unfortunately we didn't have enough time for much other than the main building this time, yet another place far too large for just one day, looks like I'm going to have to revisit, what a shame! Once again, I'd seen hundreds of photos, but when faced with the real thing, it was another story. The decay in this place is stunning, one of my favourite rooms being a hall with black paint bleeding down the walls, and of course, the corridors… well what can I say, words can't really do this place much justice! We spent a fair few hours wandering the main building, and tried and failed to get into the water tower and the morgue, all somehow without getting busted, then, right as we were about to leave, my tripod decided to fail me and my poor wide angle hit the floor bit of a damper on the day, but what can you do, these things happen.. >.< Anyway, enough rambling, and on with some photos - Thanks for looking ^.^
  10. ello again chaps and chapettes, i've already harped on about a load of nonsense nothing to do with the explore on my carlton theatre report so if you want some sort of personal intro and explanation about how the explore came about then id say go read the first paragraph of my carlton report and then come back to me diving straight in with the explore. The explore. Landed in lincoln about 20/30 mins before the other guys and proceeded to drive an oap special fish and chips with curry sauce into me before going for a wander around the perimeter of the site and getting an idea for what we were looking at once the other lads landed. the recce told me half the site is a building site and half the access to the site is tucked away at the back of a row of housing estates gardens, during my recce i also walked straight into the secca, i wasn't anywhere i shouldn't be but at the same time i had no good reason to be where i was with a camera and tripod hanging off me if you know what i mean, he defo knew what i was here for and didn't take his eyes off me as i pretended to be on the phone and looked like i was looking for house number along the row of houses opposite the main entrance. shortly after the lads landed aswell and we proceeded to wander the perimeter fence together, sods law as soon we walk within 20 feet of the fence mr secca strolls around the corner, just as im pointing out a potential weak spot in the fence, again we weren't anywhere we shouldn't be but now there was four of us wandering around looking rather suspicious, we walked around the public footpath and the whole time the secca staring at us, we walked into the housing estate to discuss our options as by this point secca was stood on top of a mound of earth on us like a hawk. we decided to cut through the housing estate and make our way around the front, once we had done a loop we were back where we started with no secca so swiftly over we went and in no time we were in, it was getting pretty dark pretty fast at this point but luckily we were armed with torches so wasn't too much of a problem apart from the potential for being easily spotted wandering around with torches of course! quite enjoyed the mooch in the dark, wasn't as creepy as you'd want an old asylum in the dark, think the place has lost a lot of its vibe through the building project but still has nice features in there. All in a nice little mooch and a good start to the weekend History St John’s Asylum in Lincolnshire, in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s. It was originally built to house just 250 patients, but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates as they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service. The asylum finally closed it's doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats. on with the picys thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy
  11. I didn’t think I would get the chance to see this place again, and this was one of my favourite explores… I was very keen to go back. And man was it worth it – I saw 4 times more than my last visit three years ago. It was a real privilege to see the cells, the hall, the grand staircase; and some more those iconic honeycomb ceilings. The building is extremely dicey in places – a lot worse than I remembered. Some floors are wonky, some floors are rotten… and some floors are missing altogether. That said, the natural decay in here is awesome. The site is being converted for housing. A lot of the foliage has been cleared, building work has begun, and the water tower controversially demolished. Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960’s it was known as St John’s Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main building. the cells the main hall the grand staircase Sorry its a bit pic heavy; but this was an awesome explore. One of my favourites
  12. The Visit Another one that has probably been covered many times on the forum but again as I'm new over here I thought its one of those that's always quite nice to see. Pretty standard explore really, nice and relaxed and no bother from the locals which is always nice The History High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital south of the village of Menston, West Yorkshire, England. The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre (1.2 km²) estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is intricately decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease.
  13. Hello all, Recently realised i never did anything with my High Royds Photos. You all know the history so i wont bore you with that... Heres how it all played out; How I got a restraining order from a building... Cast your mind back to February... 2 years since the last report on High Royds and as conversion was well underway everyone thought the place was gone. Until one dark cold night when myself Raz and Ant took a mosey on over to see what was left and we were amazed to find that the admin building and a ward near the back of the site hadn't been touched. SWEET! So we waited till the weekend, and we retruned with the cameras. We spent a good few hours roaming around having a laugh until whilst stood in one of the corridoors we hear voices... and the owners of said voices come around the corner in their high vis and read us our rights. Great we've been arrested.... After a while the dickhead who had arrested us realised we weren't actually doing anything wrong and he backed off, called off the dog unit and left the decent officers to deal with us. After convincing them we were only there to take pictures, the officers took us over to the housing develpment office to speak with the lady in the showroom. As we walked in there was a couple speaking with her about buying a house, she took one look at the police, then at us filthy and clearly being detained, and they left. Ooops. With the development lady in tow, we went into the show house where we were made to apologise to the lady. She then left us alone with the cops, who wrote out restraining orders for the lot of us and then one of them walked over the brightest white carpet ive ever seen in muddy boots. "Looks like your not the only ones getting their wrists slapped today" He said looking at what he'd done. So we and the police made a quick exit before we were caught. So in one day, we were arrested, ruined a carpet, and got banned from entering the premises until Feb 2016 Photos; I apologise for some of the above photos if they make your eyes bleed... This was when i still thought HDR was cool. Sins of my youth Thanks for looking
  14. History, stolen from @hamtagger "Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960's it was known as St John's Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main building." The Explore After hearing several different stories of the security here I was a little sceptical. Really not knowing what to expect and seeing very few reports in the last year we had no idea if it was going to be worth it. Seeing as this will be literally on my doorstep when I move in a few weeks me and @hamtagger decided to pay the old girl a visit. We had a great explore, lots to see, the decay is awesome in places and you can see from old reports not a lot has changed except there has been some scaffolding added to the main staircase and someone has had a little sweep up in certain areas. My highlight was the Iron arches with the Cross on them, the little Urine test box which I had seen in HT's previous report and was so shocked it was still there and that beautiful honeycomb ceiling. We got in and out undetected On with the pics This is what I get when I leave my camera unattended... thanks [MENTION=1029]hamtagger[/MENTION] This is what the staircase looks like now, the whole of it is covered in scaffolding. The main Hall Thanks for looking!
  15. This is a repeated place and one that the whole of OS know. I stumbled across a old report on another forum and since havent seen many others post so here it is.. Little Plumstead was home to Norfolk’s main “mental deficiency colony”. In recent years, it has closed down. Sadly a lot of the buildings have been demolished to make way for housing. Part of the site remains in use as a hospital. This section is due to close soon, with around 100 patients moving to community-based services. It has since demolished a lot of buildings including the pool leaving only 6 derelict standing buildings caked with decay and fragile floors. The hall itself attracts a lot of explorers and ghost hunters and has seen fire damage and metal thievery as well as tagger. The upstairs of all the buildings in which extensive decay can be seen, warped floors, carpet going down into the non exsistant rafters and debris and scattered paper everywhere plus that lovely smell of dampness and black mould that we all love... masks are needed although ive never worn one. The inside of the hall is to me like a chateu whilst ive only ever seen one on groups or forums its very simliar with its arch designs and colours. Every time i have gained access and seen this place, it draws me in i cant explain the feel in the hall but its almost like you are being watched and waiting for a zombie to smash through a door and come and bite you. There is so much decay the floors upstairs are gone in some areas and in others there simply is no floor at all, Trollys left, files scattered, medical reports everywhere, spend needles and some aperatus is left. Massive rooms for treatment as seen from very old pictures of the place, The asylum itself seemed to have a ward for un married women who were pregnant and were made to be treated as the public rejected them (Information to be confirmed), However no evidence of this has been seen. It has since been boarded up and checked on at regular intervals due to the amount of breaking in the building's recieve with thick ply and mastic being placed and security screws everywhere entrance other than the local kids breaking in is almost impossible to gain entry at least without doing it the naughty way which i personally dont agree with. The once grand staircase now completely trashed Rooftop views (Very fragile lead roof) Finally, im a celebrity nutter GET ME OUTTA HERE haha Hopefully if and when there is a entry point again we will be able to obtain more detailled pictures but until then,,,, Enjoy.
  16. Had to visit this, as it’s on the proverbial doorstep, and I can’t believe I didn’t know about this one. I’d missed out on the group’s previous day’s exploits, but at least I got something in, even if I was a bit unprepared. Enjoyed this atmospheric place. Don’t be fooled by the photos – it was quite dark in there. All taken with no torch, but around 30 second exposures. Explore with Auntieknickers, The Stig & KM Punk Saw the mortuary, but unfortunately didn’t get any photos… the police turned up, so we made a retreat. St. Mary’s was originally a work house and later turned into a hospital, this place, unlike most others, retained some of it's original features from it's Workhouse origins. The whole Vagrant's block had been retained. Why they did this was unclear, but a small section of this small block was converted into a small Mortuary that would service both St Mary's and Melton Mowbray cottage hospitals. thanks for looking
  17. USA My fave asylum here in the U.S

    I love the kirkbrides but this one is one of my faves and I visit it as often as I can. I wished I'd had a chance to see it before my first time though in 2012.....before the fire in 2007 devastated the South Wing . These are from various trips there
  18. Monkeyboy here! This one I've wanted to do for a while, for some reason I just never go there. When the opportunity arose I was BUZZING to get here, some people have done it many times, seen it all, etc, but this has always been a 'want' for me. Probably the best remaining asylum in the UK as all of the epics like Cane Hill and West Park, etc are history. Here's some copied history on the place as I'm sure you've read it all before: Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 to the design of architect Frank Whitmore. It opened in May 1913. The 300-acre (120 ha) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). Closure The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. A few of the satellite villas as of 2013 are still operational as research facilities on the edge of the site. This includes "Chestnut Villa" (originally Children's Villa), which provides laboratory services, and "Willow House" (originally Male Acute Ward), and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). "Rivendell", a more modern building is still in use at the entrance to the site. Apart from Chestnut Villa, all remaining Buildings still in use are owned and run by North Essex Partnership University Foundation Trust. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally, the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the Central Boiler House in 2007. In 2008, the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Photos: And of course:
  19. Italy Manicomio di R - 2015

    More Italy reportage! This place was particularly special and possibly my favourite location on the whole trip Italy is just full of goodness, no matter what sort of derp it is! We hit this one late afternoon and was the last location of the day, we didn't get as long as we'd liked in here, we were losing the light fast. However, the warm afternoon light worked so well for photos in here, but i'm gonna have to go back for some for some more asylum goodness Pics: Of course, this report has to start with the corridor shot Tried my best with the lens corrections here.. This awesome corridor leads to the main theatre.. By this point, i'm buzzing my tits off And there it is.. So much better in person! Cheers
  20. Towers Hospital Leicester The Explore What a fucking weekend, visited with Urbexbandoned Got to Leicester early with a certain post office on our minds. After a quick recce of the access, I was perhaps a little over-cautious to be honest and convinced T do go and check out some other locations and return when things looked a bit quieter. Fast forward several hours later and isn't hindsight is a wonderful thing? If we had have gone for the access earlier it would've unfortunately resulted in finding the same sealed up part that we did, only after the assault course that we embarked on. A big "fuck you' to a CCTV camera as we legged it past it, and an eventual climb through a window as a pigeon almost implanted Mrs. Pigeon's birdgina's fluff into my forehead. Rewind.... Walked through a shopping centre full of humans in the hunt for a bit of nightclub action, car parks, more humans, chavs, more cameras with obviously no mother fucker at the screen end. Slipped underneath Leicester for a good hour, sometimes if you're necky it's amazing how you can wonder away from the normal people and through a brown door into service tunnels and fire escape stairwells until you eventually bump into a high viz mongaloid in the underground delivery yard who only responds to any question with the sound "yarp or narp" After being escorted back to the shopping centre I realised that maybe we had just met the missing link between ape and man. A slap up candlelit dinner for two in Maccies later (my treat ) and after walking several miles around checking out a few other possible locations we headed towards Towers.... So I had a pop at this place about 14 months ago and unfortunately we walked into a live workshop area and got busted within about 5 minutes before getting to the main Hospital bit. I was surprised to find that the whole area and the access area i had in mind had been completely flattened. The first part was a walk in thanks to the demo which was well in progress, corridors that i wanted to see last year had sadly been reduced to big piles of bricks. Only the front area and old part of the hospital remains and there may be even less now. The part that i wanted to see was the wards area and unfortunately they had started ripping down suspended ceilings and removing radiators and stuff like that and generally making a mess of the floors which in turn made it difficult to photograph. After a long time walking around the outside of this part we eventually found a broken window which i climbed through then swiftly locked myself in like a bellend as i let the door to the room close behind me Luckily Urbexbandoned was there to climb in to rescue me lol. The History (robbed as always ) Due to population growth and the refusal of the Commissioners in Lunacy to sanction an enlargement of the County Asylum, in 1865 the Leicester Corporation decided to build an asylum for the town’s pauper lunatics. A 30 acre site in Humberstone was purchased for the new Leicester Borough Asylum by the Leicester Borough Council in 1864, for the sum of £8,000. The site was purchased from the executors of the Broadbent estate, having formerly been the home of Benjamin Broadbent (1813 – 1862). Benjamin Broadbent had formed the company of Broadbents Ltd in Leicester in 1840 and by 1861 had amassed sufficient funds to build a house known as Victoria House on a large estate in Humberstone. This was a substantial property and is described in the deeds as a mansion house with stables, coach house, vineries, orchard, houses, conservatories and outbuildings. Anyway, glad to get to see whats left of this place and document a little bit of what it was like before the imminent conversion or whatever they're doing to the place, just wish I wasn't my usual lazy self with the tripod (or lack of the use of it) and got some better pictures but here they are anyway... The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7/8. 9. 10. 11. 12/13. 14. 15. 16/17. 18. 19. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  21. Italy Manicomio DC - 2015

    Hi all! More yummy Italy reports here This one's a bit special, trashed but with a crazy amount of wheelchairs left behind and some great architecture, some proper asylumy stuff too One of the last locations on our big Italy tour, and it seemed to me a great way to begin the round off of the trip. We heard a lot of strange sounds inside here, glass sweeping, doors slamming, furniture moving and what sounded like a service bell ringing when I was shooting down a long corridor. I thought it was perhaps Andy playing a joke, but when we all gathered at the end of the explore ready to leave I questioned the group on it. Everyone had thought the same, that it was one of us lot messing around, but we're all pretty sure there was someone else in there, i'm not one for ghosty stories or the dreaded ORBZ, not one bit, but I think someone else was toying with us. Anyway, photos: Head restraints:
  22. Manicomio di R is an abandoned asylum in Italy. Built in 1871 the hospital was a transformation of other buildings that were originally a hospital of charitable institutions, and later a military college. The hospital was used to treat the mentally ill, and electroshock therapy was used extensively here, along with experimental operations on the nervous system. Facilities included a laboratory of clinical research, one of pathology, one radiology, one of electrotherapy and an operating room for intervention to the nervous system. The asylum closed down in the early 1980s and has been abandoned ever since. Very little damage has been caused, so natural decay has been allowed to work its magic on the old corridors and rooms resulting in a pleasant glimpse of the Italian past. Our Visit This place went straight to the top of my list of favourite asylums in the world! Unassuming from the outside, the building has so much to offer inside. The huge corridors with tall windows are so bright and airy, and the building has a lovely feel to it. Add the old fashioned operating theatre and x-ray machines, chapel and left over items into the mix to achieve urbex heaven! We arrived here quite late in the day and didn’t have long before the light faded, I could have happily spent all day here. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Want more? View the full set from here on my website - Behind Closed Doors
  23. Birkwood Asylum dates from the 1860's and closed in 2002. The most attractive of the buildings and the feture of this report is the old Birkwood House which was constructed in 1819 and was a stately home until the 1860's when an additional wing was added and the Asylum established. Many additional buildings were added over the years within the grounds which are all now crumbing and falling apart while the old stone built stately home remains! Supposedly haunted by some doctor who was killed by a patient in one of the pink coloured wards upstairs the site has become a frequently visited location for 'ghost hunters' infact we saw some on our first trip here but thankfully this time we had the place to ourselves. Visited with Baron Scotland and Lowri, we mainly just went for the spiral staircase but I snapped a few other shots before we moved on to the next location. Currently developers are working on the building as part of a £50 million rennovation and I believe some new contractor lighting has been installed on the staircase. Anyways on with the photos! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Few more photos and high res copies of the ones above on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2014/06/15/urbex-asylum-b-somewhere-scotland-april-2014-revisit/
  24. I no what your all thinking.. Not another Denbigh report this place has been done so many times I've even been there a few times myself but here goes anyway.. It is in quite a bad way been smashed to pieces and full off graff even tho elwyn does try his best to keep people out. Or in some cases he attracts people there. I have seen him on two occasions I've visited but he didn't see me haha.. Collapsed roofs, mangled cages and sunken floors - these are the eerie pictures taken inside an abandoned psychiatric hospital where patients were once locked up and given lobotomies. The abandoned site in north Wales, known as Denbigh Asylum, has been partially devastated by fire while there are still cages intact that were used to prevent patients escaping from their designated areas. More than 20 patients were selected for prefrontal lobotomy treatments between 1942 and 1944 at the hospital, with one patient dying from the controversial procedure. Lobotomies, which consisted of the removal of parts of the brain, began to be routinely carried out in the 1930s as a supposed treatment for those considered insane - but the barbaric practice was stopped two decades later with the introduction of antipsychotic medicines. The once eloquent and imposing building was built in 1848 and designed by architect Thomas Full James. It was designated for closure by MP Enoch Powell in 1960 and was finally shut for good in 1995. Photographer Mathew Growcoot described the scene: 'It was by far the creepiest place I have ever been into. There were so many strange noises emanating from the buildings that I really didn't want to wander too far from my companion. 'At one point we both heard what sounded like a groan and just stopped and stared at each other. I don't believe in ghosts but I didn't want to hang around.' The site has been subject to a compulsory purchase order by Denbighshire council. But that is being appealed by the site's current owners. The front facade is Grade II listed and a proposal to build homes around the entrance has been put forward. However, the restoration cost is set to be close to a million pounds. Mr Growcoot added: 'It was in a really poor state. It looked as thought a bomb had tore through the site, everything was damaged. There was nothing to stop you entering the site and as a result the vandalism and fire damage was plain to see. 'I wonder how far a million pounds would go to restoring the hospital. Seems as though it would make more sense to flatten the site and start over.' Me spying on elwyn as he gets his dogs out..
  25. Visited with Zero and The Baron back in March, didn't bump into a hundred people aswell, which was nice. Sure you have seen and heard enough of this place so ill keep it short and sweet. High Royds Hospital is a former psychiatric hospital in West Yorkshire. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, the High Royds Hospital Railway, but this was closed in 1951 The hospital is located within in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough and was first opened on 8 October 1888 as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum. The hospital closed in 2003 and the site has since been developed for residential use, some of which is in the old hospital buildings. Since its closure, the site has been used as a film set for the film Asylum, as well as for the successful television series No Angels and Bodies. The drama Diamond Geezer starring David Jason which aired on ITV1 in March 2005 was also partly shot at High Royds. Leeds band Kaiser Chiefs have written a song ("Highroyds") about the former hospital. Three of the band (Nick Hodgson, Nick 'Peanut' Baines and Simon Rix) used to attend St. Mary's Catholic High School, the school that faces High Royds Hospital. The band Kasabian named their third album, West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum, after the hospital after hearing about it on a TV documentary. Few photos from the day. Thanks for looking people
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