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  1. Hiya! My name is Faith- I have a website/blog for my adventures around the world. Lots of urbex, Mad Max/postapocalyptic festivals like Wasteland Weekend, ghost towns, legends etc. I'm based in England but travel all over the place and I'm always looking to team up with fellow explorers. www.lifeoutthere.co.uk
  2. Spooky place i used to pass regular Denbigh.... that was it
  3. In this video we are exploring an abandoned asylum which opened in 1930 and closed in 1997. I hope you liked the video!
  4. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  5. This is Manicomio Di V (Mental asylum). The hospital was built in 1930 due to growing demand for mental support in the region. The hospital closed in 1991 due to new laws. [ The overgrown church [ The entrance of the theatre The decaying theatre The old projector Fences to prevent patients escaping or committing suicide The overgrown roads through the facility The entrance of the shower building The shower rooms Decaying bathroom Picture of one of the patients This was the section were alcohol addicted people would be taken care of Old poster of a Lancia Prisma Backstage the theatre The stockroom One room were the patients would sleep a couple of phones thrown in a corner Thanks for looking!
  6. Last year we explored what we could of the mostly demolished Harperbury Asylum. At the time there was a building that intrigued us but was completely closed off and we couldn't get in. Well, we re-visted today and it was all opened up. A few photos from that building below... the full explore information, video and photos are on our website here: http://www.britainsdecays.com/harperbury-hospital-history-the-forgotten-harperbury-mental-asylum-sits-abandoned-decaying/ This is our original explore video:
  7. We visited St John's Hospital in Lincolnshire on Sunday, here is our video. Although we were told the security at the hospital was extremely tight we didn't actually come across any security at all! They must have been having a day off lol.
  8. We visited this Uk asylum on a road trip, we didn't have much time here but the time we did spend was brilliant. We had to think out of the box to get to different places, crawling through holes. There were loads of workers around so we had to dodge them quite alot. The main hall and the projector room was the highlight, some parts of the asylum were very modern, not as good as the old school Victorian places like West Park Asylum. I hear some of it has gone, but there may still be some left, but I'd have to ask around. A great place! 1 The first corridor we got to, workers were on the left demolishing some of the outbuildings 2 Conservatory area 3 Strange store room, nature taking over 4 Female bathroom; very bright! 5 Main hall, incredible! It even had a disco ball! 6 Projector room. very small in here, all intact 7 Some artefacts left behind!
  9. This is a classic mooch from a little while back, only never got around to actually reporting it anywhere! This site is now completely redeveloped, so no chance of future explores unfortunately HISTORY Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent. The hospital has been closed since 2007 amd has since been under redevelopment into flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. AERIAL VIEW THE EXPLORE - 14.3.2012 With a little pointer from a 'contact' we were able to enjoy an explore without too much interruption. The builders were obviously having a lay in, as it wasnt until after lunchtime that they started getting suspitious! By then we'd got most of our shots and made a stealthy retreat! THE PHOTOS THANKS FOR LOOKING!! And finally! Who can you spot left in the dust?!
  10. If you want to go here; be quick!! It is being worked on, demolition! I said I'd go back here, but havent been back since.. That was about 3 years ago! haha This was the last site of our 3/4 day roadtrip. It was a really good little trip and we got quite a bit done, followed up some leads, some were possible, others too busy with workers. 1 - This corridor made me ladyjizz^^ 2 - 3 - The boys cracked the water tower. I stayed in the tunnels 4 5 6 Probably my fave shot^^ 7 8 9 10 Superintendents house 11 12
  11. ]A truly stunning exterior, with some beautiful features, and a very scary "security guard" He made his dog bite my friend, he has hired some local teens to walk around the place with rifles to scare off any explorers and is a truly horrible man, I have a video of him threatening me and my friends. Anyway, it's a shame the main hall and morgue slab has gone, but this place is still truly magnificent! There is work being done on this place but if you are very quick you can make it! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  12. This one is a little trashed, but it still has some great character left behind. There is old buildings and new buildings, with character in both. And there is a padded cell in a basement but I did not have a torch with me. The chapel is great, it was used a creche for children. The windows are protected. The future of this building is unknown, fights between councils and land owners... 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
  13. Twos a nice fresh sunny morning ... blah blah blah .... am not going to bore you with history or anything else for that matter ... probably be reports on quite a number of occasion's ... so i'll just share a few pics ... hope you like
  14. On this trip, we found this litte but nice asylum in the near from the actual objective. Fast in - fast out with realy nice motive's 1. Pflegeheim 60 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Pflegeheim 60 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Pflegeheim 60 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Pflegeheim 60 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Pflegeheim 60 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Pflegeheim 60 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Pflegeheim 60 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Pflegeheim 60 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Pflegeheim 60 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 10. Pflegeheim 60 10 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  15. During a Italian trip waaaay back in 2016, I visited this rather lovely Manicomio in the heart of a seaside Italian City, it was impressive to say the least. Huge stairs, huge windows, high ceilings, but sadly rather empty, but I enjoyed it enough to go back this year with Baroness Von DerpBangers. Thanks for looking
  16. At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  17. This ominous building once served as the power plant for the Central State Mental Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  18. A bit of history: Sunnyside Royal hospital was a psychiatric hospital founded in 1781 located in Hillside, Scotland. The hospital was originally founded as the Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary & Dispensary by Susan Carnegie. In 1858, a new improved asylum was completed in the village of Hillside on lands of the farm of Sunnyside and the old site was vacated. The site was further developed adding a new facility for private patients called Carnegie House in 1899. Despite this addition, overcrowding was a problem, as the asylum's patient numbers had grown to 670 by 1900 leading to additional building work to be undertaken. Two new buildings were added to the facility and additional staff were required to care for the additional patients. A further development was the addition of Angus House, which was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia. After the 1946 National Health Service act brought the hospital under the control of the Eastern Regional Hospital Board, the name changed from the Royal Asylum of Montrose to the Royal Mental Hospital of Montrose. In 1962 it became Sunnyside Royal Hospital and came under the jurisdiction of new management. The site was officially closed in late 2011 after being open for 230 years and most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital. The Explore: Its not often we venture north of the wall so we didn't arrive at the location until after dark and the by that time the weather had taken a turn for the worse. This was the last stop of the day after a gruelling 03:30 set off and was to act as base camp before the crazy drive home in the morning, After wandering around in the rain for a while we managed entry and began the explore. After a very short walk we decided we found the best spot to set up, nothing to do with no one daring to explore further.... After what was possibly the worst nights sleep ever we took advantage of the morning light and began wandering. The place definitely had a much safer feel to it and has to be the best asylum I am probably going to see for a very long while. Explored with @-Raz-, @Hydro and another friend not on OS. Cheers for looking!!
  19. History High Royds Hospital (formerly known as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum) first opened on the 8th October 1888. The main purpose of the asylum was to contain and restrain mentally ill patients. People often spent decades imprisoned in the asylum, which was recognized in the High Royds Cemetery which stands as a testament to those who spent their last days there. People lived very repetitive and lonely lives in the asylum due to poor care and understanding of mental illness in the 19th century, and it was common for people to be admitted for minor mental illnesses, such as phobias, anxiety and learning disabilities. The asylum was given the name Menston Mental Hospital in the 1920's, (and eventually became High Royds Asylum in 1963), and cures for mental illness were considered as an alternative to simply storing patients. The use of shock therapy was introduced with the intention of putting patients into a relaxed mental state, however this resulted in many patients screaming in pain, and sometimes caused them to become unconscious. Lobotomy was also a popular treatment at High Royds around this time. The hospital was closed in 2003 because it had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. The site is now being redeveloped into a new village, and all that remains is the admin block, which is grade II listed. Some features of the hospital will remain, such as the clock tower and ballroom. I've been here a few times so the photos are from various trips. I only ever got to see the Admin block but it was worth it for the clock tower and ballroom which I'm glad they're keeping. Explored with @plod and a few others. Sadly this place is now a no-go, I think its safe to assume somebody had been caught by the residents which brought attention to the access point, as they always seem to have their eyes out. I'm glad I at least got to see the last little bit that was left while it still stands though.
  20. Severalls Hospital (also known as the Second Essex County Asylum and Severalls Mental Hospital) was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 in Colchester. The 300-acre site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. I don't generally post reports from old trips but nobody has posted a report from here for ages so why not, it's a classic! The first time I went we spent 4 hours inside before being busted by a Gurkha just as we were leaving. He was a smily chap who didn't speak much English, I gave my name as Robert Palmer and sang him a quick rendition of my hit 'Addicted to love' before he let us out and told us to "come back and try again tomorrow" with a cheeky wink. I returned a couple of weeks later and this time we managed 7 hours unseen and saw a fair bit of the site. There isn't much stuff left behind but the long corridors and 20 odd years of natural decay are really photogenic in places. The site is now apparently being prepped for initial demolition, all the trees have gone and there is new security in place so my advice is to get down there soon if you want to see it before it goes. Asylums will soon be a thing of the past.... 1. The front of the admin building 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Squirrels Boutique was the hospital tuck shop 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. This was where the main hall existed before it was destroyed in a fire and demolished in 2007 26. More fire damage, the beams on the ceiling stood out in the shape of a crucifix from this angle 27. 28. Some externals 29. 30. Thanks for looking
  21. A little bit of history on another place I'm sure you've all seen plenty before - The 300-acre (120 ha) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. A few of the satellite villas as of 2013 are still operational as research facilities on the edge of the site. (Copied from Wikipedia, though loads of info on the hospital to be found here too- http://severallshospital.co.uk/#/home-page/4531049539 Annd the explore - Explored again with TheVampiricSquid and a couple other explorers. After a reluctant 4am start, (cheers to thevampiricsquid for letting me crash at his, I'm not sure how I would have fared if I'd had to do that extra bit of driving in the morning!) helped by the downing of energy drinks and a stop at maccie's we finally made it over to essex to meet the others just as daylight came creeping in. Over the quite frankly evil fence we went, and off to the main building. Unfortunately we didn't have enough time for much other than the main building this time, yet another place far too large for just one day, looks like I'm going to have to revisit, what a shame! Once again, I'd seen hundreds of photos, but when faced with the real thing, it was another story. The decay in this place is stunning, one of my favourite rooms being a hall with black paint bleeding down the walls, and of course, the corridors… well what can I say, words can't really do this place much justice! We spent a fair few hours wandering the main building, and tried and failed to get into the water tower and the morgue, all somehow without getting busted, then, right as we were about to leave, my tripod decided to fail me and my poor wide angle hit the floor bit of a damper on the day, but what can you do, these things happen.. >.< Anyway, enough rambling, and on with some photos - Thanks for looking ^.^
  22. History A bit of a mish mash as I couldn't find much just on the Chapel but this is what I did find. After its closure, the land of the former Hospital was purchased for residential development by Bloor Homes. It was sold off to various other developers such as Redrow, Barratt, Harron Homes, Wimpey and PJ Livesey although Bloor’s were the major house builder for the new Wadsley Park estate which was constructed on the site of the old hospital. The Wadsley Park village consists of a mixture of houses and apartments of various sizes. Some of the old hospital structures were designated as listed buildings, the main admin block (the clock tower), Kingswood ward, the church and the porters lodge were all grade II listed and could not be demolished with the rest of the hospital. The administration building and clock tower were converted into 38 luxury apartments by Urbani after permission to demolish the building was denied and the building is now known as Middlewood Lodge. The Kingswood ward has been converted into 85 apartments by developers PJ Livesey and is known as Kingswood Hall. The porter's lodge on Middlewood Road has been refurbished and is now a nursery. The hospital church has been derelict for many years, it held its last service on 6 November 1996 to mark the closure of the hospital. In March 2012 plans were submitted by architectural design consultancy Coda Studios that may see the imposing Victorian church converted into a mixture of town houses and apartments. The scheme which needs approval from Sheffield City Council also contains proposals for a selection of partially underground eco-friendly bungalows beneath the building. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger , we had allready been on one explore in Sheffield and were running out of daylight hours so needed one that wasn't going to take long. I had seen the post @Paulpowers had posted on this little chapel and liked the look of it. Not much left to it really but what I did see was nice. The initial thought I had when seeing it was it looked like a really gloomy church. Almost hidden beneath greenery you could see the spire and top poking out as we approached. Entry was relatively easy. The ground had been dug out inside with channels in between each Column. I am assuming they do this to see what the foundations are like. Actually I didn't assume this. HT told me and I just thought it would make me a little more intelligent haha! The structure is pretty sound, quite sad to see how much graf and vandalism this place has had. It's always quite sad to see someone deface the 'house of god'. Not that I am religious or anything but more respectful if anything. There are some wonderful stained glass windows in here, especially the one which was placed in there just after World War II. Anyway, not much left to say on this place. 1: The Exterior 2: The inside looking back from the Altar 3: 4: 5: The right Transept windows 6: The remains of the Organ 7: The Original flooring, mostly covered in Pigeon Shit 8: One of the few remaining Stained Glass windows 9: The part I liked the most, still 100% intact too. A little slice of history
  23. St. John's Asylum The Explore.. Visited with @Urbexbandoned. Thought we should really check this place out last year in October as there hadn't been anything from the place for ages, mainly due to people probably assuming the place was converted, but in reality you can see from the main road that there is a large proportion still derelict. At a guess I'd say 70-80% of it. The chapel at the front is now swanky apartments and the main frontage has been repaired and to be fair looks pretty good as the original architecture has all been retained. Some new build houses have appeared and other sections to the left are now townhouses and apartments. Still quite a bit to see but one thing I did notice was some areas that were pretty intact 18 months ago have had floor/roof collapses and are a bit of a death trap now. Some of the corridors that were previously accessible are now bricked up and some of the areas that weren't have now become viewable thanks to the conversion in progress. I considered venturing through into the converted areas to get some snaps but decided it'd be a lot easier just to look on right Rightmove rather than bump into the onsite (and quite on the ball) security In and out undetected which is always nice as the current secca policy I've heard is to call the cops from the police station across the road, and ask questions later.. They now have dogs there too... The History. Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960's it was known as St John's Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main buildings. The Pictures.. 1. 2. 3/4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9/10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17/18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24/25. 26. The area where they are stripping walls and floors back to bare brick for the conversion.. As always, thanks for looking and feedback appreciated
  24. ello again chaps and chapettes, i've already harped on about a load of nonsense nothing to do with the explore on my carlton theatre report so if you want some sort of personal intro and explanation about how the explore came about then id say go read the first paragraph of my carlton report and then come back to me diving straight in with the explore. The explore. Landed in lincoln about 20/30 mins before the other guys and proceeded to drive an oap special fish and chips with curry sauce into me before going for a wander around the perimeter of the site and getting an idea for what we were looking at once the other lads landed. the recce told me half the site is a building site and half the access to the site is tucked away at the back of a row of housing estates gardens, during my recce i also walked straight into the secca, i wasn't anywhere i shouldn't be but at the same time i had no good reason to be where i was with a camera and tripod hanging off me if you know what i mean, he defo knew what i was here for and didn't take his eyes off me as i pretended to be on the phone and looked like i was looking for house number along the row of houses opposite the main entrance. shortly after the lads landed aswell and we proceeded to wander the perimeter fence together, sods law as soon we walk within 20 feet of the fence mr secca strolls around the corner, just as im pointing out a potential weak spot in the fence, again we weren't anywhere we shouldn't be but now there was four of us wandering around looking rather suspicious, we walked around the public footpath and the whole time the secca staring at us, we walked into the housing estate to discuss our options as by this point secca was stood on top of a mound of earth on us like a hawk. we decided to cut through the housing estate and make our way around the front, once we had done a loop we were back where we started with no secca so swiftly over we went and in no time we were in, it was getting pretty dark pretty fast at this point but luckily we were armed with torches so wasn't too much of a problem apart from the potential for being easily spotted wandering around with torches of course! quite enjoyed the mooch in the dark, wasn't as creepy as you'd want an old asylum in the dark, think the place has lost a lot of its vibe through the building project but still has nice features in there. All in a nice little mooch and a good start to the weekend History St John’s Asylum in Lincolnshire, in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s. It was originally built to house just 250 patients, but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates as they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service. The asylum finally closed it's doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats. on with the picys thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy
  25. I didn’t think I would get the chance to see this place again, and this was one of my favourite explores… I was very keen to go back. And man was it worth it – I saw 4 times more than my last visit three years ago. It was a real privilege to see the cells, the hall, the grand staircase; and some more those iconic honeycomb ceilings. The building is extremely dicey in places – a lot worse than I remembered. Some floors are wonky, some floors are rotten… and some floors are missing altogether. That said, the natural decay in here is awesome. The site is being converted for housing. A lot of the foliage has been cleared, building work has begun, and the water tower controversially demolished. Built under the name Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852, set in 120 acres of grounds. In 1940, female patients were transferred around the UK to make way for an emergency department for the war effort. The newly established NHS took control in 1948 and by the 1960’s it was known as St John’s Hospital. The Hospital was closed in 1989, since then it has been sold and gradually been demolished to make way for housing leaving just the main building. the cells the main hall the grand staircase Sorry its a bit pic heavy; but this was an awesome explore. One of my favourites
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