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Found 5 results

  1. Hi all, my second attempt to post some, thanks everybody for your patience with my photobucket ignorance the mill is from 1906 with interior quite well preserved. Entrance is through an Art Nouveau administration annexe. Local teenagers opened a club in the derelict building right after reunification - techno club program from 2006 still available :-) the quality is eerie unfortunately, will look into a better camera next
  2. Visited with Space Invader and Fort Knox Zero And for some History; Many proposals had been made for a Channel Tunnel dating as far back as Napoleonic times and in 1875 serious planning began on both sides of the Channel. However, early attempts on the English side were not very successful and flooding was a continual problem. In 1880 a test shaft was sunk at Abbot’s Cliff near Folkestone, followed by a second shaft at Shakespeare Cliff in 1881. The tunnel was expected to be completed by 1886, but the British Government were beginning to grow increasingly concerned that the Tunnel would render Britain extremely vulnerable in the face of an invading army from Europe (by this time recently unified Germany were perceived as posing the greatest military threat to Britain). The government remained concerned; very little work proceeded after 1882 and the project was forcibly abandoned in 1898 when bring was permanently restrained through the High Court. Today the wooden props within the original shaft are rotten and crumple very easily and chalk falls are numerous. As the tunnel slopes downwards, the height of water begins to increase until a point is reached beyond which access is not possible. My Pics Entrance into the tunnel, goes under the main railway line Moving further into the entrance The mark of the Man ! Looking back down the entrance tunnel and into the bore of the main tunnel itself Not too bad at this point Starting to fill up with water Deeper still didnt proceed any further Was a good afternoons explore and the weather was kind for a change, well worth a look
  3. visited with Silver Rainbow and fortknox o a little history... There had been numerous proposals for a tunnel under the channel throughout the 19th Century including one by Napoleon, but the first serious attempt to build a tunnel came with an Act of Parliament in 1875 authorising the Channel Tunnel Company Ltd. to start preliminary trials. This was an Anglo French project with a simultaneous Act of Parliament in France. By 1877 several shafts had been sunk to a depth of 330 feet at Sangatte in France but initial work carried out at St. Margaret's Bay, to the east of Dover had to be abandoned due to flooding. In 1880 under the direction of Sir Edward Watkin, Chairman of the South Eastern Railway, a new shaft (No. 1 shaft) was sunk at Abbot's Cliff, between Dover and Folkestone with a horizontal gallery being driven along the cliff, 10 feet above the high water mark. This seven foot diameter pilot tunnel was eventually to be enlarged to standard gauge with a connection to the South Eastern Railway. After Welsh miners had bored 800 feet of tunnel a second shaft (No 2) was sunk at Shakespeare Cliff in February 1881. This tunnel was started under the foreshore heading towards a mid channel meeting with the French pilot tunnel.Both tunnels were to have been bored using a compressed air boring machine invented and built by Colonel Fredrick Beaumont MP. Beaumont had been involved with the Channel Tunnel Company since 1874 and had successfully bored a number of tunnels without the use of explosives and 3 ½ times faster than manual labour. It was not however Beaumont's boring machine that was used. Captain Thomas English of Dartford, Kent patented a far superior rotary boring machine in 1880 capable of cutting nearly half a mile a month and it was this not Beaumont's machine that was used on this first attempt at tunnelling under the channel. The tunnel was credited to Beaumont in 'The Engineer' magazine and despite letters of protest from English the editor refused to correct the mistake and Beaumont did nothing to clarify the situation. Even to this day this early Channel Tunnel trial is often credited to the Beaumont machine. the graffiti.... thanks for looking
  4. Right after report not long back myself and uncle b decided we'd put this off long enough so cold weather and long walk aside we decided to go for it,we where joined by obscurity ,maniac and ofatjameso...was cold wet and thats before we hit the tunnel,excuse quality of pictures as finding a steady unmoving part of ground to place tripod wasn't easy..Thanks to obscurity for pointing out the Nice bit of graffiti Many proposals had been made for a Channel Tunnel dating as far back as Napoleonic times and in 1875 serious planning began on both sides of the Channel. However, early attempts on the English side were not very successful and flooding was a continual problem. In 1880 a test shaft was sunk at Abbot’s Cliff near Folkestone, followed by a second shaft at Shakespeare Cliff in 1881. The tunnel was expected to be completed by 1886, but the British Government were beginning to grow increasingly concerned that the Tunnel would render Britain extremely vulnerable in the face of an invading army from Europe (by this time recently unified Germany were perceived as posing the greatest military threat to Britain). The government remained concerned; very little work proceeded after 1882 and the project was forcibly abandoned in 1898 when bring was permanently restrained through the High Court History taken from underground kent For a more in-depth history you could check here… http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/c/channel_tunnel_1880_attempt/index.shtml or do a bit of a Google Right some pictures of the evening. And cheers again to obs for pointing this out as id walked past it twice... ..A very cold wet night but worth it for a look at something we'd heard and seen a fair bit about before
  5. ok firstly i would like to say a big thanyou to Powersurge for inviting me along to this place. I dont think its somewhere i would bother going back to i hate walking and this is one LONG walk to the entrance. I have added a couple of pictures from the day. We visited the channel tunnel first thing, then on to the old folkestone station and finally i showed Powersurge round Road of Rememberance. anyway on with the report: From as far back as Napoleonic times there had been proposals for a channel tunnel and in 1875 planning on both sides of the channel became serious. There were earlier attempts than this one on the english side but they were unsuccessful and all flooded. But, at abbot's cliff near folkestone a test bore was sunk in 1880 along with another at shakespeare cliff in 1881. THe government became worried that a channel tunnel would make britain vulnerable to invasion meaning that very little work proceeded after 1882 untill the project was abandoned in 1898. originally the bore was planned to be completed by 1886. Today the tunnel is very unstabe and in a state of disrepair. there has also been very recent downfalls meaning one of the main features being the carving dated 1880 is no longer visable. audit leading to the 1880 bore attempt. some light paining some various photos of the bore...notice the condition getting worse as you get further in finally a couple of photos of sunny folkestone...what a day to go exploring enjoy Xplora

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