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Found 26 results

  1. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  2. I haven't posted on here for ages, while I have been out and about I haven't done that much this year at all being busy with personal and family matters. Instead of doing the odd one here and there I tend to do the longer trips, I've got a couple of trips lined up in the next couple of months. This was our second port of call on what was a 2 night sleeping in car, 1000+ mile tour for me. I love industrial places and this place is stunning and I could have spent hours here, this place alone made my trip worth while. As its been on here loads of times, I don't think it needs a introduction so straight down to the photos. (And there's loads) https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/albums/72157659274332585 Hope I didn't bore you with this lot
  3. The Visit Having tried this one a few months back with Funlester and being completely baffled by how to get in the place I returned with a non member armed with a little more intel and determination paid off this time This is one of those explores that you really can feel the history of the place I thought.. can just imagine what a hive of activity it must have been in its day. The History George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world's leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley's survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed.
  4. Started a little xmas tradition of heading south to do some Engerlandishshire derpage and meet up with some of the SOCC members. So for a little solo adventure before getting a little drunk at night a visit to the classic GB's was in order. Arriving reasonably early in the day I was off in search of an access point, ground covered in snow and bloody cold, it wasn't too long to find a route inside. The place was in quite bad condition and very overgrown, wouldn't be easy to navigate in the summer! But I was pleasantly suprised when I found the mostly untouched workshops, they were stunning! Didn't spend too long in this place, a couple other explorers turned up, so time for me too leave and continue exporing in my xmas bah humbug tranquility... more to follow in later reports. Thanks for looking!
  5. History: founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Explore: This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these.. As always, thanks for looking!
  6. Explored with Inside the Prohibited & a non member. History Founded in 1836,the original factory was situated on Kelham Island, Sheffield, one of the oldest industrial areas in Sheffield and they specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. In 1837 they were listed in the Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street. In 1852 they were to relocate to Cornish works and by this time they had increased there product range to include butchers knives and steel files. In 1883 George Barnsley was made a Master Cutler. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing, the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. The company finally ceased trading around 2004 The Explore Been attempting this so many times its unbelievable. First time i got it it was too dark, second time my camera was dead and the rest of the times have beeen general fails because the entry has been blocked. But anyway, finally got in with the ability to take some photos. Had a great time hanging around with Alex (Inside The Prohibited) this weekend, Nice to meet you mate Few more pics from the day; Thanks for looking
  7. Explored with -Raz- Bit of background; Coke has been produced on this site for 130 years, with the current works being the last independent coke works in the country until it was bought by Hargreaves (Norec) in 2005. It is estimated that the plant produces 11 megawatts of energy, for the less savyy that is enough energy from gas to power itself and 1,000 homes on top of that. It was also ranked one of Europe’s leading coke product producers. When the plant closed in December 2014 it sparked the end of the coal industry in Barnsley, an industry that at one time provided 50% of the jobs for males in the area. The plant is currently awaiting decommission as of this report date. The Explore; After a previous visit which was short lived and ended in "eyup flower tha nos tha shunt be on ere" we figured it might be a good time to make the return visit. Starting off the night terribly with not one but 2 locations that denied us access we set off for the Coke works on our way home. Once inside the perimeter we play the stealth game avoiding cameras so as not to alert the secca to our position and made our way steadily to the other side of the site where we found a control room full of buttons and cool looking pipes; Apon leaving the controls behind we headed over to the head gear and attemped to climb it but as we were doing it the security rumbled us and made the point that we werent wearing PPE. As an after thought we should noted to him that Hi-Vis jackets and nightime stealth dont particularly go hand in hand. So again i didnt see the whole site... Revisit is very much needed!! If you made it this far, thanks for reading
  8. This is my George Barnsley visit, there are many like it, but this one is mine My first visit, the gate's always been shut before, I'm sure I'll be back. You all know the history, on with the pics... Wouldn't be a GB report without that pic
  9. Hello again So over the bank holidays we took a trip to see an old friend (George Barnsley) havnt been for a while and was in the area so thought why the heck not George Barnsley & Sons Ltd specialised in tools for shoe makers and leather workers. The building closed around 2004. Enjoy... Thanks for looking
  10. George Barnsley and sons, a key toolmakers in Sheffield's history, well at least for us lot.. Heres a small set for you i took a few months back now enjoy:p THanks ........
  11. FINALLY!!! Many, many years after I first saw this place pop up and thought 'oh hey that looks pretty neat I should go there' I have got it done. And I loved it even more than I thought I would, what a way for me to start the new year. Explored in completely miserable pouring rain but by the end of it I was so happy I didn't care that I was filthy and sodden and smelling of damp wood and bird poo, I could spend so much time in here you'd have to remove my cold dead body from it when I conk out. Every man and his dog knows the history of this place and what it was about so here are some photos. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157650087333402
  12. A nice little relaxed explore. Not that amazing but a few good things left to photograph. History: George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Thanks For Looking!
  13. George Barnsley

    Some may of heard a rumor that good old GBs is sealed. Well yes it is and they have done a good job of it too. The faithful explore is out at the moment but hopefully not for long.
  14. Bit of History. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83. Splored with Zero81 & met up with Mexico75,Esposa,S8,The Riddlers & Tiddlers there..... Thanks...
  15. Northern Trip Part 2 – George Barnsley and Sons Cornish Works (Sheffield) So, continuing to try and cheer myself up; I went on a long awaited Northern Tour with my close friend TBM. After replacing his rig he very kindly gave me his now not needed Sigma 10-20 lens. Unfortunately we did not notice until the last moment that this lens had a slight fault with the mount, causing some focussing issues in many of my photos. But I didn’t let this dampen my trip. What a weekend, I have got some serious photos and experiences from this under my belt now and I hope you enjoy. Day two and onto Sheffield for two explores, The Tool Maker: George Barnsley and Sons and of course the Crown Courts. I really liked this place, it had that real “Northern Industrial Decline†about it, it’s a true time-warp to Industrial Britain. It’s a shame places like this don’t really exist anymore. It’s the kind of place where you could go in and ask for a handful of bolts and they would give them to you for free. Its not in a great state by the look of it so I’m glad I captured it when I did. In 1823; George Barnsley was apprenticed into the file-makers trade by his mother, Anne. Anne was a widow. George was signed in to the apprenticeship – to a Thomas Wing of Sheffield – for seven years and two hundred and seventy one days. Later; George went in to partnership with his brother and they established themselves as one of the worlds leading manufacturers of shoe manufacturing tools and leather trades. Throughout the 19th century, the company grew and the Barnsley family were highly regarded in the thriving city of Sheffield. Eventually the vintage factory and production methods forced production to cease and give in to the increasingly competitive import market and the growing costs of production, finally closing in 2003. Northern Trip Part 3 – Sheffield Crown Courts Northern Trip Part 1 – The Burnley Empire More At: George Barnsley and Sons - a set on Flickr
  16. Visited solo. I'd wanted to do this the week before when I did the Courthouse but I was worn out after that so I knocked it back again. Having another free weekend to do something, I thought why not try this? So back over to Sheffield I went. And I'm glad I did! Looking at reports, nothing really stood out to me when I looked at the place initially; there's nothing genuinely eye catching like a complete row of intact machinery. GB's is different. With a place like this, you have to be there to appreciate it to its fullest. Having been completely unaltered since it was built around 150 years ago, this is a real treasure to behold. On the other hand, I did nearly cop out of it... I got to the access point, no problem. Without going into too much detail here, however, some idiot kicked the ladder used to get in back in the courtyard! Now this is no ordinary drop; it's at least 12 feet to the ground. Worried sick to say the least (who would come and get me if I broke my ankle on the way down? How would I get back out?), I hung off the ledge, in a moment of blind faith I drop off. I land safely, thank fuck! On through the jungle of a courtyard. Initial impressions are very good! Quite trashed, but still caught somewhere in time. And the reason why this is a defining explore for Sheffield... In the offices new graffiti has put a downer on the otherwise brilliant vibe of the place, but luckily this is contained to just that area. Crucified pigeon Trudging on, you really have to watch your footing here as some of the floors are rotten to the core! One or two rooms were inaccessible because of that but it wasn't really a big deal. On a final note, I'm so, so glad I chose to see it. It was never a high priority, but that certain vibe the place has just blew away all expectations. A wonderful, wonderful explore. I probably won't go back because of the access though; even getting out was dodgy! Love as always, TBM x
  17. George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.: George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83
  18. Be gentle, this is my first report ! lol Visited with urban witness, urban sentry & urban tempest After seeing a lot of reports for this place i had wanted to visit it for a while, all i can say it was worth the wait. The only downside is one of us ( me ) forgot spare camera batteries . All that means is a re visit is on the cards asap to get the shots i missed . History stolen from Lowry Jen's report :confused History: George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. The building finally closed in 2004 and has been left abandoned ever since.
  19. On the way back from 'Shotgun' I thought it would be nice to nip in and say hello to GBs to grab some wide angle shots... Was ACE!! Love this place!! Only downer was the addition of grafitti up the office stairs!! I'm all for a bit of well placed graf, but here... No! ME NO LIKEY!! Still a crackin' way to spend a few hours... HERES ME PIX... Thanks awfully for looking...
  20. Visited with PROJ3CTM4YH3M and Darbians on a very cold and snowy day. I had no idea what to expect of this place as I had never seen any pictures of it before I went, it was so much better than I could have imagined, absolutely loved it. History: George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death. The building finally closed in 2004 and has been left abandoned ever since.
  21. GEORGE BARNSLEY & SONS LTD, SHEFFIELD. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Me and NK took a mooch round this crackin' old place on a Bobbys fueled whistle stop tour of 'Steel Town'. Brilliant splore! Highly recommend this one, if youve not been then get crackin'!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ On with some pix... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ THANKS FOR LOOKIN'...
  22. George Barnsley & Sons. Founded in 1836,the original factory was situated on Kelham Island, Sheffield, one of the oldest industrial areas in Sheffield and they specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. In 1837 they were listed in the Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street. In 1852 they were to relocate to Cornish works and by this time they had increased there product range to include butchers knives and steel files. In 1883 George Barnsley was made a Master Cutler. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing, the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. The company finally ceased trading around 2004. After an extremely adrenaline rush entrance up and down a few rotten ladders we found our way into the building, Quite a dusty place but still pretty awesome First report Thanks for looking! UrbanNoodle!
  23. This place is well nice a big thanks to Blueink top job on info you gave me . This place is bigger than it looks from the outside MUCH BIGGER !, Ooooozing with goodness from one of the biggest stores to line drive shafts......iwe were in for hours and i still want to go back (and will).....history has been done in bits and bobs so on with the pics. Very fine grinding wheels....Knife sharpening ! 2 nice spinning frames.....with an over head line drive shaft Handles. Think this crane is not telling the truth some how ! Hand written logs well nice find Rest easy old friend......in time we will all be with you. A look into the air raid shelters under the works, we came across 2 air filtration units hand driven. hope you liked.....there must be more to this place.
  24. Day out smootching around for mines and yup !.....found this..... Hmmmmm scatter gun comes to mind.....lock stock "n" two smoking barrels.........you know what I mean ?... Don't think they want us to come in !. Stairs to no where ! Time to hit the cellar... Well !
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