Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'belgium'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 829 results

  1. And old 18 century house with had a bank function.The building is stripped of all furniture an will probably be renovated in some future. Needed to be a little bit inventive to gain access to this one. But later I was all alone, with the only sound coming from the people in front of the building. 1 IMG_1541 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_1534-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_1519-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_1488 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_1453 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_1441-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_1450-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  2. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  3. Hello, This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos. This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost. It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!
  4. Hi! Thank you for acceptation and your message on my Facebook Page! I've some times so i'll post some pictures of my exploration of "Slides of the Past" aka "Maison Alexa", located in Belgium. I don't post every pictures because i've done 51 photos... If you want to see the others, you can go on FB / Flickr and search "PixRoads"! Thanks! ^^ Let's go, have a nice visit and day #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  5. One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  6. My first post to this forum. Today we visited a factory somewhere in Belgium. It used to be a plant where soda but mostly water was bottled and then prepared for distribution to grocery stores in Belgium and surrounding countries. The factory stopped being productive because of a severe collapse of the roof. We didn't have any hightech-equipment so I used my iPhone to make some pics. enjoy!
  7. Hey everyone! It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images. As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (: 1st day:Usine Barbele The entrance was quite easy. The place where the hole in the fence should be seemed to have been closed a few times already; but everytime a new hole was opened just a few steps further. Arriving at the heart of the plant, we quickly made our way up to the rows of coking furnaces. It was a rather dark day, clouds hanging heavily in the sky, and we stopped many times when some loose parts made loud crashing noises, moved by the wind. We did not feel comfortable here, it seemed like we were not welcome. After taking some portraits at the big fans, my girlfriend told me she was hearing engine sounds, and we decided to rush into a small cabin at the side of the road and hide. And really, she was right: A black Dacia made its way slowly around the plant, passing the shed where we were hiding. We heard it stopping somewhere, opening and closing it's doors again, and we were in complete agreement we should leave this place as fast as posible. Hiding behind everything we found, we fled along the side of the way, stopping and quietly peeking back every now and then. 2nd day: HFB We decided to be quick with this one when thinking back to the day before. We made our way to the blast furnace, took some photos and left again. We'll have a look at the rest of the site on our tour in march. ET Phone Home I found this one online just the day before, and after a short research, I had the coordinates. After having a stop at a small park to have a look at a sculpture we wanted to see, we quickly headed over the fields toward this one. We arrived at sunset, and after strolling through high grass and climbing the small fence, we stood in the middle of those antennas. I really liked the view, but I'm not at all pleased with the pictures I made. Maybe we'll repeat that one someday. 3rd day: Diesel Power Plant Not much to say. The door that was said to be open was closed again, so we moved on to the sea and did not any exploration that day. 4th day: Salle des Compresseurs We made our way in from the west. According to the parts we found in this wasteland, it used to be some kind of power station. There are also some basement structures where you can still find some electrical gear. The compressor house was a nice little place - nice machines looking like ducks, rust, peeling paint, plants. Beautiful. 5th day: Power Plant X The access to this one was said to be "a bit dirty", but i really enjoyed it. We took some shots in the boiler room and moved on to the pumping room in the next building. Sadly we didn't get to see the big hall with the gas motors as renovation work was going on - the space was lit up like a soccer field and plastic sheets were covering windows and machines. Let's hope it gets well preserved for the posterity so they can enjoy that view too! Terres Rouges This one was easy. We heard stories of police driving around and were careful, but luckily nothing happened. The place isn't as impressive as HFB or Usine Barbele and in a quite bad shape, but there were some nice perspectives. It was raining cats and dogs, so we didn't have much time to shoot the nice reflections. That's it for now. There aren't so much images as we also did a bit of sightseeing and I sorted out a bunch that I didn't like or weren't able to process to the point where I could post them with a good feeling Hope you still like them! If you like to see some (but that's not THAT much) more images, you can hit up my flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/152392524@N08/albums We'll do another tour in March (Be, Lux, Fr, Es, It, Ch) and hopefully we'll come back with more pictures. Maybe I'll also add some of my older images. And of course, thanks a lot to the people that helped me with the locations and confirmed my researched coordinates - it's really nice to know how to get in and somebody has been there recently. I won't publish the names here so that you don't get flooded with requests, I hope that's ok. You rock! best wishes from Germany, Nico
  8. It´s a special kind of silence that´s being felt all over that place. It´s peaceful. Heather´s growing like a carpet and right between all the weathered stone crosses. Once made out of plain stone, they now mark the human remains of former patients of the nearby psychiatric hospital, who deceased between the years 1921 - 1981. As the cemetery was opened in '21 the hospital was still named "Rijkskrankzinnigengesticht" ("public mental hospital") - a customary term at that time. Around 1750 - exclusively male - patients were buried here. As mentioned above, the last one in 1981. The graves itselves are designed pretty simple. The individual stone cross only contains a metal plate with the name as well as the date of birth and death of the patient in respective. You can´t help it but ask yourself what kind of lives they might had had. It was not uncommon that patients had to spend a significant part of their lives in such institutions, not to say even their whole lives. One thing is certain at last. They all had to spend the rest of their lives within an institution, which excluded them from society. The graveyard itself is located right in the middle of the woods. Thanks to the sunny weather of a late summer´s day, it helped to find the atmosphere more peaceful than anything else. The sun was shining and created an immense heat between the stone crosses and the heather growing all over the place, just helped to add friendliness to the whole scenery. I´m sure a cold, misty November´s day would change the whole atmosphere completely. Yet, the friendly weather that day couldn´t delude me from that gloomy mood arising deep down. All those seemingly perfect stone crosses in a row, those bleached out plastic flowers on some of the graves and further, partly indefinable objects being found on the site - remnants of an unique culture of memory - made me feel quite uneasy. Shortly before leaving the grounds, I spotted a pretty new-looking plushie, a mouse. Sitting right on one of the crosses, already with cobwebs on its head. It really appeared out of place. My gaze settled on the fence around the burial site. Right in the middle of the woods, I could see a woman standing on the other side of the fence. Rooted at the spot and gazing at me as well. Or maybe she wasn´t even looking at me, but the whole scenery itself. I started to feel a bit uneasy, as I feared she wouldn´t like me to be right in the middle of that burial site. Yet, when I started to approach her, I was able to recognise her as a patient of the still existing psychiatric hospital nearby. Apparently, she was on an excursion through the woods with other patients, but had left the group for a short time. I really asked myself, what her thoughts were. I´ll never know. Coming nearer, she disappeared in the thicket and I left the cemetery grounds.
  9. Hi everyone! I'm looking for people to visit locations together, somewhere in Belgium, NL, Luxembourg, France, or nearby) I'm rather experienced with urbex, but I don't really like doing it alone and it's hard to find people who also understand what they're doing at locations. I'm mostly interested in metro/underground stuff and roofs. Soon I'm planning to search for some roofs in Brussels and Amsterdam, and check out local metro. If you'd like to join me - let me know!
  10. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  11. Hello all! Time for my second post here.. This time something different again then my previous one. Last Sunday a friend and i had no clue what to do.. So we've left somewhat late in the morning to this "little-big" slatemine, that i still had to visit.. It used to be a bigger mine back in the days , but due to flooded levels and collapses that happend during the years, only a small bit of it is still explorable. Complete darkness once you've turned off the flashlight, and only the noise of water falling on the floor. Still some equipment was left inside this mine... i wonder what the flooded levels have left.. It looks like their have been divers in there before.. Spend 3hours and a half inside of the mine.. Once outside we where back in the snow ! Was actually way warmer inside of it then outside Was a bit difficult lighting out all the pictures, but the end result is good afterall Anyway one great piece of history! Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
  12. The Godarville tunnel was a boatunnel and has a length of 1050 meters. In order to overcome the enormous differences in height on the Charleroi-Brussels canal, many locks were built in the Samme valley between Ronquières and Seneffe and a 1267 m long tunnel was built : La Bête tunnel. Soon there was a need for a canal with a larger capacity and between 1854 and 1857 the canal was enlarged for vessels up to 350 tons. The old tunnel, however, formed a bottleneck and so it was replaced by the new tunnel of Godarville. As a result, the number of locks was limited to 30. After the Second World War it was decided to make the canal navigable for ships up to 1350 tons. Since neither the Samme nor the tunnel of Godarville could make this enlargement, a new route had to be built between Ronquières and Godarville. . The tunnel is closed with large metal gates on both sides to keep the cold out during the winter. On the south side, in the tunnel next to the canal, there is a towpath on which the horses towed the boats. Dimensions length: 1050 m width: 8 m maximum ship width: 5 m maximum draft: 2.1 m
  13. A small but nice chapelle in Belgium... 1. Chapelle D M 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Chapelle D M 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Chapelle D M 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Chapelle D M 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Chapelle D M 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Chapelle D M 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Chapelle D M 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Chapelle D M 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  14. Jumanji - a Manor with a litte special part... 1. Jumanji 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Jumanji 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Jumanji 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Jumanji 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Jumanji 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Jumanji 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Jumanji 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Jumanji 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Jumanji 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  15. At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery.
  16. History Château D’ah was constructed at some point in the mid-nineteenth century. For many years, it was owned by an aristocratic family, before it became, for a short time at least, a small apostolic school (part of the Apostolic Church). The school closed shortly after the outbreak of World War Two, leaving the house abandoned for a period of time. Somehow, it survived the heavy bombardment of the German invasion, while the town around it crumbled. It is not known who purchased or occupied the château after the war ended. By the later 1950s, the château was purchased by Rémy Magermans, a famous printer and photographer. Magermans founded his company in the late 1940s and moved into the property as his business expanded. As the château comprised a large amount of land, he was able to construct a printing workshop next door to the manor. Magermans owned the building until he passed away in 2009. Since becoming vacant, many people, including photographers, artists and vandals, have visited the site and it has gradually deteriorated. Our Version of Events After a good session in Brussels, sampling the fine beer of Belgium, we set off in the direction of Luxembourg. Our grand aim was to find an incredibly large underground fortress, but since that entailed a fair bit of driving we figured we might as well check out a few abandoned châteaus along the way. Château D’ah took our fancy because we’d seen some shots of the main downstairs corridor and a very striking staircase. In hindsight, though, if we’d known how fucked the place was going to be, we probably would have given this place a miss and checked out a couple of other locations we had on our list. In terms of gaining access to the site, it was incredibly easy. Vandals have seen to it that anyone can waltz inside these days. Once inside then, we were initially very disappointed. All of the decorative wall paper was ruined, the staircase has been trashed and is rapidly becoming heavily decayed, and everything else around us has been smashed to pieces. Upstairs, things were even worse. Our advice to anyone planning a visit here would be to skip these floors. Other than the reasonably good view from the roof, it’s a complete waste of time going up there. However, there was one really good part to this explore, and it was the reason we decided to post the report. To be perfectly honest, we stumbled across the basement by accident. It turns out that a group of sleep-deprived explorers with severe hangovers aren’t the most observant, so it’s a wonder one of us actually discovered it. Anyway, after noticing it we staggered our way down the stone steps to the bottom. Having only expected to find one room down there, we were pleasantly surprised that there were several rooms and a strange brick corridor. In the end, we spent longer down there than the château itself. We found it was quite photogenic. Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26:
  17. An abandoned house along a Belgian road. The house was partly destroyed by a fire and the former owner now resides with family. Some family member comes by occasionaly to feed the stray cats. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
  18. This complex was built in the late 70's as the faculty of science and biology of a renowned university. It is located in a quiet, residential area surrounded by a large park. Due to the architecture, the buildings are a bit futuristic and out of place here . It gets even more interesting when you find the greenhouses where a group of 'highly motivated' researchers may have spent a lot of hours amidst their plants in the company of pizza and distilled water. The buildings were abandoned after being in use for only 30 years. Not because of structural problems, the university had simply become too small, as the courses gained popularity. So the students moved to a larger and newer building closer to the other faculties. 1. 2. 3. 4. how panda's are made ... 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
  19. History The village of Doel is said to date back to 1267. It was originally known as ‘De Doolen’ (‘border water’) and up until the eighteenth century it was essentially an island surrounded by flooded plains. For many years, due to its unusual geographical location, it was unclear which country Doel actually belonged to – whether it was the region controlled by Spain or the independent State of the Netherlands. The design of the village that exists today has been dated back to the Eighty Years War (somewhere between 1568 and 1648) and it remains largely unchanged; it is completely surrounded by old seawalls and has been built according to a checkerboard pattern (the village consists of three streets parallel to the riverfront, four streets perpendicular to those, and all of it criss-crossed with alleys and small corridors). Doel also boasts many historical buildings. Some of these include Belgium’s oldest stone windmill (which is not abandoned), Reynard Farm, the Old Hoefyzer (a farmstead and inn site), and the Baroque Hooghuis that once belonged to the family of seventeenth-century artist, Pieter Paul Rubens. However, despite its obvious historical significance, just before the turn of the millennium the Belgian government announced that Doel was destined to be demolished to make way for the enlargement of the Port of Antwerp. All the residents in the village were offered cash premiums to sell-up voluntarily, and they were encouraged to take up the offer by being told that any refusal would lead to expropriation and the offer of much less money. As a result, by 2007 there were fewer than three-hundred and fifty people left in the village – a reduction from approximately one thousand three-hundred. In an effort to save the village, plans were launched to open the site as an open-air museum, with various famous artists painting murals to deliver the message: ‘Don’t take our village away.’ Nevertheless, other artists were soon attracted to the site and began to use the buildings as canvases for their own work. Now, only a few buildings remain free of graffiti; these are the homes of the last residents in Doel. They are the villagers who have shown resilience against the government and, despite facing attacks by squads of riot police, which has resulted in the streets being strewn with rubble and the start of some of the demolition work, they continue in their effort to save the village and their homes. Even with their efforts, though, these defiant individuals are acutely aware that the gradual deterioration and destruction of the village only strengthens the likelihood that the port will, in the very end, win. The only good news to emerge is that, in response to the imminent outcome, plans have emerged to dismantle and rebuild, brick by brick, some of the historic sites in a neighbouring town. This is to ensure they are preserved for the enjoyment and education of future generations. Our Version of Events On our mission to consume lots of good beer, we left Bruges and set off in the direction of Antwerp. However, just over an hour later we found that we were almost upon the great city. We’d neglected to take into consideration how small Belgium is so we had a bit of spare time to kill before it was time to get pissed all over again. To break up the drinking and sober up a bit, then, we decided to go take a quick look at the [mostly] abandoned village of Doel we’d read about some time ago. Finding the place was easy. We simply drove in the direction of the great big nuclear power plant that towers over everything within its vicinity. What is more, with few residents still living in the village itself, there was no dodging and diving to get onsite. Instead, we simply drove straight into the heart of Doel. It felt very strange to be driving along streets that seemed completely abandoned. There was nothing especially spectacular about the place given that most of the buildings are simply empty shells and homes, but there was still something rather cool about the whole experience. The best bit, of course, was being able to find a parking spot right in the middle of the explore. That never happens! All in all, it didn’t take long to walk around the place. We had a bit of a mooch down every street, and peeked inside a fair few of the buildings. But, as we quickly discovered, there’s very little left inside any of the structures. The only interesting thing we found in one of the houses was a small kitten and around twenty dishes of rotten food. Unfortunately, the cat bolted as soon as we entered the building, so there wasn’t much we could do to try and save it. We didn’t have anything edible on us to lure it back either, only strong Belgian beer. Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26:
  20. During a conversation with a fellow explorer we came to the conclusion that I have been able to visit some beautiful steelworks ... In the neighboring countries! Having this playground of rust and steel in my backyard and even went there, was quite embarrassing... . A bit later a date was set and another week later I stood on the blast furnace, enjoying the sun and the view. Wow! I immediately understand why the great love for industry begins here for so many explorers. And admit, there are worse places and views to eat your sandwiches. After our picnic and the conclusion that my fellow explorers was severely sunburned, we went back and went to discover the beautiful places that this place has to offer , bumping into the resident copper-thieves here and there, but they didn't seem to feel bothered by our presence. 1. the road up to the blast furnace. I love it that you can spot 'her'while you're gradually approaching. Also, active trains running by from the right hand side make it a surreal experience 2. view from above 3 +4 the mandatory selfies on the BF 4. 'the fish' 5 +6 : the giant squid 7. 8. 9. 10 11 12 the spider 13
  21. Recently, I´ve visited "Mold House". Of course, more than well-known. When I first set my eyes on pictures of that house with its amazing colours and its state of decay, I instantly fell in love. I´m glad I could fulfill my dream of visiting that place. I especially loved the pink colour of the armchairs being sokaed into the carpet.
  22. History Castle Wolvenhof, also known by many as Château Du Loup, was designed by J. Vercoutere and constructed between 1912 and 1914 for the industrialist, Gaspard Vanden Bogaerde. It was one of two castles built in the area. With the outbreak of World War One, Bogaerde and his brother Émile, the owner of the second castle, volunteered to enlist in the Belgian army and they were subsequently sent away to fight. While they were away, German forces commandeered the buildings and the site was converted into a prison camp and a small airfield named Flugplatz Abeele. Towards the end of the war, Castle Wolvenhof sustained a significant amount of damage as much of the wood, including the very expensive floorboards, was torn out and used as firewood. Following the German defeat, the two brothers returned to their properties and spent the next few years renovating them. The Bogaerde families continued to live in the castles long after the Second World War. However, in 1999, both buildings were sold to the city and the grounds were opened as a public park. Today, although it is a heritage building, Castle Wolvenhof is abandoned. Yet, after someone, presumably the city, invested 322,500 euros in the property in 2016, restoration work has begun. The aim of the project is to bring back the building and return it to its former glory. It is unknown what purpose the building will serve once the restoration work is complete; one source suggests it will remain a central part of the park in which it is situated. Our Version of Events Although we’d just returned from New Zealand and had barely set foot on English soil, we decided that a new trip was in order, to make the most of the good summer weather Europe has been experiencing. So, with an epic explore in mind, somewhere along the Maginot Line, we decided to travel through Belgium to reach it. Our decision to visit Belgium was twofold: we could see a few abandoned sites along the way, and drink lots of Belgian beer. The first stop on our travels, mainly for a quick break after driving from the north east, was the legendary Château Du Loup. Surprisingly, finding it was easier than we’d imagined, and gaining access wasn’t as hard as we’d anticipated. However, no sooner had we stepped inside the building did we set off an alarm. From the inside, though, it didn’t seem to sound too loud, so we decided to crack on and take some snaps anyway. For the next half an hour, then, we raced around the building trying to take a photo of each room. The entire time it felt as though a farmer might turn up, or some kind of Belgian security guard, but, fortunately, neither did. In the end, we were able to leave without further incident. It was only when we were making our way back outside that we realised how loud the alarm really was. It was clearly attracting quite a bit of attention from the people who were making good use of the surrounding parkland too. At this point, then, we decided to casually join the general public and take a wander around the park. Our blending in seemed to work rather well, other than the fact our French and Flemish skills don’t go much further than ‘Hallo’, ‘Ik ben op zoek naar, John’ and ‘Bonjour’. Still, it was enough to get us back to the cars. After that, our next destination was Bruges, with plenty of time left in the day to drink lots of beer! Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24:
  23. A modern diesel power plant! Great place to explore. No masks needed for entry Thanks!
  24. The castle, built in 1913, became known under the pseudonym "du loup". After several years of vacancy, from 2010 it was inhabited for a short term. Now it's uninhabited again. Due to many requests, the city of Izegem decided to open it for photographers for one day, on 09. September 2017 (that's the reason for my post in the forum now, maybe someone is interested in it. For this, a written application must be submitted in advance: https://www.west-vlaanderen.be/genieten/domeinen/WallemoteWolvenhof/Paginas/default.aspx ). --- My visit was in May 2010. I thought the building was still abandoned, but a new resident recently had moved in. So I rang the bell, and after a short conversation he gave me permission to take some pictures. But he had little time and I got only about 15 minutes for this. So I really had to hurry, to photograph the rooms I was allowed to enter... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  25. Former water tower. Don't know much about this place, but it was cool to visit something different. Didn't made it to the top, too lazy . When we just finished this place, security came along, luckily they didn't caught us. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
×