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Found 3 results

  1. St. Lawrence's Asylum (Cornwall County Asylum), Bodmin, Cornwall Seffy and END-PROC. Some history for you, seeing as this place has only recently cropped back up: After this place had been described to me a while ago, I did some searching online, and instantly wanted it. To be honest, the hall alone seemed a good enough reason to pay it a visit. Like others though, I'd been put off by tales of PIRs, high tech CCTV systems and security patrols left, right and centre. Seeing as it's a good two and a half hours drive from me, the idea of going all that way and failing was not appealing in the slightest. This meant I needed to wait until I had confirmation that it could be done, before making the trip. This conformation came in the form of two reports only a week or two ago. As soon as I saw them, I knew that now was the time! A big thanks to djflava, who, after not being able to make it himself, kindly gave us the heads up we needed to get in. This being said, access was not as easy as first anticipated, and a lot of trial and error was involved, but the result was worth it in the end. Time was not on our side, which meant that we didn't have time to see it all. I mean, what a shame, that might mean I just have to take another trip back... Cheers.
  2. I wasn't sure weather to post this one as some of the photos are not great. This was my first ever explore and only had a point and shoot at the time and no tripod. It's very stripped inside the hospital but the main hall is fantastic and probably one of the best in the UK, this is down to the very effective security and P.I.R sensors scattered around the site, we managed 4 hours in here before we were welcomed by 2 secca and 6 coppers some of which were armed. A couple of years later I returned and found access to the service tunnels but every access point into the hospital from the tunnels were sealed off.
  3. The granite quarry at St Breward's primary function was to supply the building blocks for the re build of Bodmin's notorious Gaol back in the mid 1800's. But granite blocks from this St Breward source have built great bridges and cobbled our roads far and wide, giving rise to some of the most prominent architectural structures in the land. The great Naval College at Dartmouth owes its character to St Breward stone and in Britain's capital, so does, London's County Hall, Transport House, the Esso Tower, the Shipping Office and most of the buildings in Paternoster Row. All owe their existence to St Breward stone, cut from here, dressed and shipped by transport provided by the rail head at Wenford Bridge. Now ironically, the start of the Camel trail, one of the most popular and picturesque nature trails used by cyclists and walkers in the country. Other perhaps more impressive architectural structures are St Breward born too and are laid claim to by the Hantergantick Quarry and St Brewards oldest and perhaps most famous commercial granite quarry, the De Lank quarry, the most famous granite quarry in Cornwall at the turn of the century. The fist quarry here, known as the Eddystone is now unused but forms a part of the whole quarry complex. It was used for the construction of the lighthouse of the same name back in 1750's
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