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  1. Tower brick and tile company is a lovely little explore tucked away in the small village of Selborne. It's very isolated, with interruptions only from the occasional passing car and the swarming birds in the field opposite. The History The Brick and Tiles company have been producing hand made bricks at this site since 1872, with production finally ceasing on the 6th of November 2009 when the company went into administration. Since then there have been attempts to breathe life back into the brickworks, however all unsuccessfully. There were plans to turn the factory into a clean eco-friendly factory by using a anaerobic digester in order to generate the gas required to power the site. Unfortunately plans for this were refused in August of 2009. (Waste-to-energy plans at Selborne brickworks refused - BBC News) The Explore After attending a wedding, nothing was better to break up the niceties of suits, dresses and canapes then getting mucky and dusty on an good explore half way into the long drive home (It was pretty much on route anyway!). The weather was cloudy and slightly foggy, but it wasn't raining and it wasn't freezing so we had no complaints. Overall a pretty chilled explore with a surprising amount of equipment and machinery left and intact. As described by Mookster, this is very much a mini Clockhouse Brickworks, although getting in was far far easier. It's a shame we rushed round here a bit, as it's one of those places you could happy spend a few hours exploring. A small factory brimming with character and interesting relics of its former years. Pictures I did laugh at this The Kiln In here is the most impressive porn room I've seen so far. A big poster of how it used to look in its former days I assume? One of a few Drying ovens. Looks like a big chemical drum leaked onto the ground. Not sure exactly what it was, but I didn't really want to find out. I'm not really sure, but this looks like it could be a press used for forming the bricks/tiles.
  2. There has been a good few reports on Clockhouse Brickworks over the last couple years, however none since they put up the new fence and filled in a lot of the access points. This didn't stop me and Brewtal however, as we ninja'd our way inside. That said, it was by far the hardest access I've ever found, full credit to the people who sealed this place up as they did a top job. We had been planning this explore for a little while now, including drone photography and scouting trips, so it was satisfying to say the least when the plan came together at the end. I visited here back in early 2015, so its was interesting to see what had changed and how much is still intact. It's sad to say that it has been well trashed and vandalised since the last visit. The last 18 months have not been kind to Clockhouse, which might be why they have erected a big fence around it. It certainly seems be a magnet for undesirables who want to steal copper and lead etc. This said, it's still remarkable how much machinery and tooling is still left, despite years of decay. I actually used to know someone who was an ex-employee here who told me a little about it. He said that shortly before it closed they had spent vast amounts of money on a new piece equipment/machinery, all of which went to complete waste. Not sure whether its true or not, but he claimed that due to the requirement to comply with new Health and safety standards, it worked out to be more expensive to bring the site up to scratch, than it was to close it and start from scratch elsewhere. I'd imagine in reality this was one of a few factors that lead to it's closure. It's pretty sad because he said he really enjoyed working there. History 'The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. The outbreak of war in 1939 was bad news for brickmaking, as housebuilding effectively ceased and the workforce was swallowed up by conscription. Although there was some demand for bricks to be used in military engineering projects, there was little use for the high-grade ceramic blocks made at Clock House. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased to meet demand from the recovering housing market and in the 1960s the factory was rebuilt to accommodate more efficient production methods. London Brick was acquired by Hanson PLC in 1984 the works was refitted shortly afterwards to produce multi stock bricks under the Butterley and Capel brand names. In 1998, Clockhouse Bricks were used by three major exhibitors in that year's Ideal Home Show and by 2000, Clock House was be Hanson’s main soft mud production site, making around 42 million bricks per year. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard, however: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, Hanson announced a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs. Hanson have since indicated that there is no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clock House Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain.' (The Derelict Miscellany :: Clock House Brickworks) The Explore As previously mentioned, they have erected a 6ft palisade fence all the way around the site. Getting past this was surprisingly easy, getting inside the building was not. We sneaked round the outside of the building look for ways in. We saw one potential one, but it seemed tricky. After ruling out every other option(not that we had many others) we decided to give it a go. It took a couple of goes but we managed it just about. We were in! It's almost overwhelming to see the vast array of machinery, walkways and control panels. It's hard to know where to even start at photographing it. Getting out proved to both easier but more painful. I managed to slip and ended up with a nice big bruise an inch below the nipple. It certainly got Brewtal worried. Exploring is dangerous kids. Drone Shots Interior Shots The Drying oven The Tool room. There used to be a big pillar drill in here, but that has disappeared. The press for the bricks. The chair shot, of course. The maintenance room has been trashed. Lol. Thanks for reading and happy Christmas!
  3. History Dyson Thermal Technologies was founded in the early 1800s, in the small valley of Stannington, by John Dyson. Initially it was operated solely by Mr. Dyson, who single-handedly mined clay to make bricks; however, by 1838 the business was listed as John Dyson and Son: Black Clay Miners and Firebrick Manufacturers. In the years that followed, Dyson became known as a high quality, high volume refractory manufacturer in the UK, and as the company grew it also became a manufacturer for ceramics; for the booming steel industry in Sheffield. Unfortunately, however, as technologies progressed in the late 90s and early 00s, which made it more economically viable to run plants that incurred lower energy costs, Dyson’s traditional manufacturing process which relied heavily on using gas fired kilns became increasingly more expensive to maintain. By 2005 a decision was made to move all operations to China and, subsequently, the plant closed down later that year; although the offices continued to operate for some time after the ‘official’ closure date to ensure that the relocation was smooth and efficient. Our Version of Events Knowing that Dyson Thermal Technologies has been done countless times before, I can’t say we expected much as we pulled up outside. Nevertheless, we were driven to visit on account of the slither of curiosity that remained somewhere inside ourselves. The day didn’t look hopeful as we set off in the rough direction of Stannington though, as dark clouds loomed in the sky and the windscreen began to blur with a light patter of rain. However, fortunately, when we arrived the rain decided to stop momentarily, so we seized the moment and darted inside as quickly as two sleep-deprived people could manage. Once inside, while staring at a semi-demolished section of the plant, we instantly began to wonder what we were doing and why we’d wasted the time to even get out of the car. But, we decided to persevere and all in all I’m quite glad we did. While the upstairs parts of the plant are almost entirely ruined, downstairs, in the lower sections, the old brick kilns can be found, and they were certainly worth the effort. Additionally, as we made our way around more of the site, other interesting relics of Dyson’s factory began to emerge and, although a lot of it has been vandalised, some fairly photogenic bits and pieces still remain. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: Dyson Thermal Technologies Chimney 2: Lift and Cage 3: Dyson Technologies in Ruins 4: Leftover Pallets 5: Heading Downstairs 6: Office Downstairs 7: Some of the Good Stuff 8: Old Produce 9: Broken Cart 10: Dyson's Warehouse 11: Single Chair in the Warehouse 12: Kiln Area 13: Kilns 14: Looking Inside one of the Large Kilns 15: Workmen's Lockers 16: Storage Area 17: Oil Tankers 18: Dyson from Up Above 19: Looking Down 20: We Have Power 21: Amperes 22: The Red Chair 23: Looking Through to the Garage 24: Scales 25: Former Workshop Area 26: Files and Paperwork 27: Storage Racks 28: 'Leave Only Footprints' 29: Walking Among the Ruins 30: The Chimney
  4. I think this can be described as a 'hidden gem' for sure. It's kind of like a half-size Clockhouse Brickworks and with just as much stuff to look at. As far as explores go it was the most peaceful chilled out and generally relaxed wander I've had for a long time, helped by the glorious weather. On the way out, we were stopped by one of the buildings caretakers/ex-workers who was relieved to see we were only taking photos and myself and Landie had quite a long chat with him about the site, the buildings they supplied bricks for, and other stuff. He informed us that there is a staff of nine people who work on the land and farm around the site and look after the place. He also said that the planning application for works expires this July and they will be looking to do 'something' with it before it lapses. The Selborne Brickworks was first opened in 1901 and extended later in life to it's current size. It was bought out by Tower Brick & Tile Co. and closed in 2009 as a result of the recession. Like with Clockhouse, when it shut down it did so without notice, so everything was left inside as it was the day it closed. There are still racks of roofing tiles in one of the dryers and bricks in the kilns. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653556365939
  5. After hearing about this place from a friend we decided to have a look around. Access was easy enough and we quickly made our way into the first building, however some of the machines were still running, and had the keys left in which was strange. Despite this we carried on and found an entrance to another building. Inside we found various parts of old machinery as well as brand new sheets of steel just lying around! Overall pretty good explore!
  6. StaffordShire has a wealth of miltary stuffs dotted around the place, I cant seem to go on a walk these days without finding some evidence of our past dotted around the place; thought I'd share some my discoveries.... Brick pillbox, Still in good condition side of layby near cannock chase. This pillbox was here as the nearby bridge is one of the few in the country that had the capability of taking the weight of the tanks. Ivy shot! The net one is Pillbox ~22 I believe, hexagonal pillbox with central concrete section to help with ricochet. This ones near newport and easily visible from the ode' google earth Then i found a sealed sunken pillbox and out building.. which was the first ever fail I found Then.... Testament to how "SPECIAL" I am te hee i walk past an allotments all the time and i thought that at the side of it was an old brick BBQ.... Not a bbq.. Writing on the door Its a Teeny Weeny Ickle one..
  7. About 5 years ago i heard of this tunnel in a small village a couple of miles away from me. And subsequently went and had a look for myself. Sadly at the time i didn't take a camera, or do much of a report. So 5 years later decided to go back, more to play, but hey ho thought il do a report while i was at. So a little bit of history: Burham works were established around 1850 by Thomas Cubitt. He built the east front of Buckingham Palace, and constructed three thousand feet of the Thames Embankment. Cubitt’s success was due to his then revolutionary method of employing vast numbers of craftsmen as a team under his direct control rather than dealing with independent tradesmen. This enabled him to build a reputation for meeting deadlines on time and on budget. Cubitt set up the Burham works towards the end of his life in order to provide a guaranteed supply of good quality bricks. It was one of many works along the banks of the Medway, in which Halling cement works was the last remaining in the area. All that remains of this and many other cement works is the pits and one long tunnel roughly 750m long. There are rumours that the majority of the pits had tunnels, and that they were used as air raid shelters during the war. This tunnel was dug to access a large chalk pit dug into the hillside below Bluebell Hill. The tunnel was hand dug, with a brick lined roof. The pits supplied chalk to APCM's Burham Cement Works which commenced making Portland cement in 1854 and ceased operation in 1938. After the pit had closed in 1938, the pit into which the tunnel leads was used by the army during WWII as a firing range and grenade range. After the war ended, the pit lay empty. Except for some locals using it to race bikes, and posiable cars. The small train that used to work in the quarry. The pit today The north portal Into the depths The original sleepers The 1st blocked passage The 2nd blocked passage, which used to be a ventilation shaft The other ventalation shaft And finally play time! Sorry about amount of pictures, tried to make it interesting, i know its been done before, but i like this tunnel.
  8. I have had several visits into this place and the last one was about 8 months ago, there's a whole world more of collapse in her but that for me just gives it more atmosphere.....the fireclay mine dates back to the beginning of the 1800's and to be hones she's in good condition sorry I can not name the mine as this would get her filled in and lost for ever.....i'm still making a survey map as i go along with some interesting finds and losses due to the collapse but that's decay for you !....enough babble and on with the pics. steel edging of a boot hope you liked this mini report...
  9. .......some picz from a abandoned brick workz in south east kent, cheerz to unfairytale for a top morning
  10. was told this was an old brick factory stumbled accross it with miss vanishing days
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