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Found 8 results

  1. History The Newport Transporter Bridge is one of six remaining fully-functioning transporter bridges left in the world; although eight still exist altogether. Originally, twenty were constructed, but many have since been closed and scrapped owing to declining ship-building industries across the world. A transporter bridge is commonly referred to as a rigid purpose built structure, positioned at a high level over the designated crossing point, from which a suspended gondola is attached. Transporter bridges were constructed between 1893 and 1916 and served to allow large ships to pass underneath. Now a Grade I listed structure, the Newport Transporter Bridge, located in South Wales, was originally constructed and completed in 1906. It cost £98,000 to complete. Of the three transporter bridges in the UK, this is the oldest and largest of them, and the largest of all throughout the world. It was designed by Ferdinand Arnodin, a French engineer, and opened by Godfrey Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar, on 12th September 1906. The transporter design was selected because Newport was a busy port area, and because the river banks at the desired crossing point were particularly low; an ordinary bridge would have required a very long approach ramp, to gain sufficient height to allow ships to pass underneath. Equally, a ferry could not be used in place of a bridge since the river is often drained of most of its water during low tide. Although a ferry did operate occasionally, it was not a practical transportation method, and many fatalities were also attributed to this method of crossing the river. The bridge was shut down in 1985, owing to general ‘wear and tear’; however, after receiving £3 million for refurbishment and renovation, it reopened in 1995. Service was halted once again in December 2008 on account of a £2 million repair bill, but after £1.225 million was invested into it, it was able to reopen on 30th July 2010. The last recorded closure of the bridge was on 16th February 2011 until 4th June, because of operational problems. As it stands though, the bridge appears to be closed once again as painting work is carried out across the entire structure. Each of the towers are measured as being 73.6 metres (241.5 ft) tall, and the height to the underside of the main girder truss above the road is 49.97 metres (163.9 ft). The span between the two towers is 196.56 metres (644.9 ft), and the clearance between the towers is estimated as being 180.44 metres (592 ft). The gondola is powered by twin 35 horse-power electric motors; the motors turn a large winch situated inside the elevated winding house on the eastern side of the bridge. Compared to the Tees Transporter Bridge, the only other fully-functioning transporter in the UK, the Newport Bridge is 5 metres (16 ft) taller, but 23 metres (75 ft) less in overall length. Overall it also uses approximately 1,400 tonnes of steel as opposed to the 2,600 tonnes used to construct the Tess Transporter. The dramatic difference in weight is due to the use of cables on the Newport bridge, which support and induce tension into its structure to a much greater extent that its Teesside counterpart. Our Version of Events With the general rule of our trip being that we weren’t allowed to be in the same place too long, we decided to leave Birmingham late on the same day we’d arrived. We had shit to do and places to be, so we hit the road and headed straight for South Wales. By the time we got there, we were already rapidly burning the cover of darkness, so we wasted no time before attempting to hit the bridge. After first assessing our access options however, things looked to be a bit trickier than we’d first considered; large security doors, for instance, have been fitted, alongside anti-climb paint, and thick mud surrounded the base of the concrete pillars. We nearly lost one of the gang down there after he’d been stumbling around in the darkness trying to find a way onto the bridge. For some reason, a sudden increase in police activity also occurred after we’d spend no less than five minutes within the vicinity of the bridge. I had to admit, at first things weren’t looking good. Nevertheless, after a quick ‘team meeting’, we fetched together a plan. And what a good idea it all turned out to be! Half an hour later, with the plan well underway, we found ourselves on the side of the bridge somewhere, nicely tucked away in the shadows of the Transporter’s steel structure. After that, it was plain sailing to top. The views up there were pretty incredible, and it was well worth the final climb up a very bendy ladder. On the whole, we probably spent longer above Newport than we did on the actual ground; until it was finally time to head back down to grab some rest before the next day’s activities ensued. Luckily for us, we parked right near the local breakfast van, so we arose the next day to the smell of sizzling bacon and sausage. With it being dark when we’d decided to hit the bridge it had been difficult to grab a decent snap of the entire structure, so we cheekily decided to return the next day to grab a few shots of the bridge in the crisp morning daylight. That was when we noticed the very cheap day pass fee which gives any customer unlimited crossing access via the gondola throughout the day, access to the high level walkway and a visit into the motor house platform: all that for a mere £2.75 per adult or £1.75 per child – absolute bargain! Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Box, The Hurricane and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18:
  2. Living in Castleford, Yorkshire, you can't really go anywhere without seeing evidence of the once booming coal mining industry in the area. This old girl, locally known simply as "The Iron Bridge" is just one example. Ive put July 15 on the header simply because that is when i took these photos when in reality i've been going down to it for years from 14 to get pissed. Classy. A little back ground on the mine; Wheldale Colliery was located on Wheldon road, Castleford. Sinking operations began in 1868, two shafts, both 13 ft dia. Were sunk to the Beeston seam at a depth of 564 yards. Production started in 1870. One of the main investors was a Dr Holt and for a number of years the colliery was known as the doctors pit. In 1899 the Wheldale coal company and Fryston coal company amalgamated. In 1919 Wheldale coal company amalgamated with Allerton Bywater collery to form Airedale Collieries LTD. Initial manpower was around 1000 men and boys and produced around 200000 tonnes of coal a year. On the 22nd Febraury 1923 9 men were killed in an underground explosion. Wheldale had no coal washing plant. In the 1930's a mineral line was laid from Wheldale to Fryston so that coal that required washing went to Fryston colliery. In 1947 the Wheldale colliery was nationalised. In 1949 major investment was undertaken. Skips were installed in the downcast shaft. There were 2 skips, each with a capacity of 6 tonnes giving a capacity of 350 tonnes per hour. The Downcast shaft had an electric winder which had two 475 H.P. motors. The upcast shaft was the men and materials shaft, this had 2 single deck cages. Each cage could hold two tubs. The winder had a 180 H.P. motor. The colliery was completely electrified. The shafts at Wheldale had 6 insets, Warren House seam at 183m, Haigh Moor seam at 258m, Flockton Thick seam at 346m, Middleton Little seam at 400m, Silkstone seam at 436m and Beeston seam at 516m. When the colliery was modernised in 1949 conveyor belts were installed, gate roads were 30 inch belts, trunk conveyors were 36 inch in width. The flockton seam had two bunkers, pit bottom bunker of 250 tonnes capacity and an inbye bunker of 200 tonnes. Dirt from repairs in the return gates were transported to the pit bottom in tubs. Material supplies and man riding was carried out using diesel locomotives. Coal was mined using AFC mounted trepanners. There was no coal preparation plant at the colliery. Coal smaller than 1 inch was sent to Glasshoughton Coking plant or to powerstations. Coal above 1 inch was sent to Fryston colliery for treatment. Wheldale produced around 400000 tonnes of coal a year from a manpower of 650 men. The coal was transported by locomotive to Fryston or by barge to Ferrybridge powerstation. When Fryston colliery closed in 1985 a barrel washer was set up to clean coal at Wheldale. In 1982 Wheldale broke its yearly production record with an output of 500000 tonnes for the year. Wheldale colliery closed in October 1987 after producing coal for 117 years. The colliery site was then cleared after salvage operations were complete. The shafts were never filled. A methane capture plant was built to convert the methane gas from the old workings into electricity. This power station generates 10MW of power and provides electricity for about 8000 homes. Hickson & Welch Chemical Co. in the background Thanks for looking
  3. Intro I was up Norfolk/Suffolk for a few days and had a few visits planned, nothing went as it should and ended up feeling a bit rubbish. I needed somewhere I could sit on top of and relax for a bit. I found this and was incredibly glad I did. Sometimes you don't need to travel far to find what you're looking for. All fisheye, a bit gritty and a bit crap, but it was fun. Enjoy. History, present and future Then it was refurbished... ...Sort of http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/railway_bridge_footpath_reopens_as_630_000_refurbishment_of_vauxhall_bridge_in_great_yarmouth_is_completed_1_2819542 £630,000 and they only half finished it? The rotting side is slowly falling into further disrepair and you get the feeling it's loosing hope, It shouldn't be red, it never was originally and it doesn't look original or as characteristic as the black side. Shame, Hopefully it'll all be done up and they'll finish the job before it's too far gone falls into the Yare. The visit and pictures So it was one of those weeks Had a crappy few visits that didn't go as planned and didn't quite feel too brilliant I'd had a day of fails and then missed the train I was intending to catch After many wanders I'd found my way back and took a rest, I couldn't relax and needed to get up somewhere Google came to the rescue and then there I was I needed to get to this, at least do something and then there I was, in the end the trip wasn't wasted It had a lot of character and it was a great night, dark skies highlighted with clouds and a pretty strong wind blew the bridge sideways I was in and it felt relaxed, again you sit up somewhere and it's all the same, big rush, then you chill at the top, the pictures are always different but every time you climb down, you want to be back up again The thing swayed like anything but that added to it It had character and for some reason it just felt good to be there It wasn't even high, it was just fun, like a climbing frame that had been neglected, waiting for some numpty like me to sit on it Even better, the public wandered below me oblivious, to be fair, I was oblivious to them It was just silent The fresh air cleared my head but the wind was as if you were even higher up I clambered down and casually crossed back over on the public section right passed the locals Then I got to the point where you look back for one more look and then onto the next No tripod, No light but luckily I had a bit of time and bridge The images don't show it as it's best but that's not the reason I climbed it It was fun And it was windy I hope you enjoyed! Cheers
  4. Tower Bridge Magistrates Court is a Grade II listed building dating back to 1906. The three storey building was designed by John Dixon Butler with a stone and brickwork exterior and an Edwardian Baroque style roof. The Court entrance is flanked by high socles supporting giant Ionic columns to the 1st and 2nd floors with the Royal coat of Arms above. There are 3 courtrooms, two are formal dark wood panelled traditional courtrooms and one is a late 1970's relatively modern courtroom. The court closed it's doors in June of last year and there are now plans for it to be turned into a hotel. I've had my eye on this for a good while, it has 24hr security inside the building and various people turn up to to work in the offices upstairs. With no obvious ways inside and with so much activity I was thinking of trying for a permission visit but just hadn't got around to it. Then something amazing happened when myself and Gabe walked past at 6am after a night of rooftopping and drinking. We rang the doorbell, security came to the door, barely even looked at us and just waved us straight in as though he was expecting us. We waltzed straight past him like we were meant to be there and disappeared through the first door we could see. We managed an hour sneaking around inside before a different security guy found us and asked us who we were. We gave him a load of cock and bull about how we were doing a photography project and our lecturer had arranged our visit. After checking his records he said we would have to come back another time when permission had been established, apparently the guy who opened the door for us was on his first shift and had assumed we were meant to be there. It was a hilarious adventure from start to finish, the only gutter was we didn't get to see Court No.1. Still, we saw the two other courts, found loads of cells downstairs, and ventured into part of the police station before we got rumbled. I took a few externals months ago before the hoarding went up.... Reception Area Court No. 2 Court No. 3 Heading for the cells Check-in Counter The Cells Taking the piss Our friendly but confused escort showing us the towards the door Sneaky last pic before we left, the door to Court No.1 on the far right, the one that got away..... [ Thanks for looking
  5. This has to be some of the most interesting outbuildings I have seen, lots of bits and bobs left behind. Good job too as the house was well sealed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Thanks to you all.
  6. History of net.. A bascule bridge is a moveable bridge with a counterweight that continuously balances the span, or "leaf," throughout the entire upward swing in providing clearance for boat traffic. Bascule is a French term for seesaw and balance, and bascule bridges operate along the same principle. They are the most common type of movable bridge in existence because they open quickly and require relatively little energy to operate. Bascule bridges may be single or double leaf. Double leaf bridges usually have any truss structure and counterweights below the deck, while a single leaf bridge is typically a truss bridge with an elevated counterweight. Although the bascule bridge has been in use since ancient times, it was not until the 1850s that engineers developed the ability to move very long, heavy spans quickly enough for practical application. The Blagoveshchensky Bridge across the Neva River in Saint Petersburg was the first large bascule bridge, opened in 1850. Since then, all bridges across the Neva and other major rivers in the city (21 in total) were bascule to facilitate navigation, which prevented the city's inhabitants from traveling across the river at night (this remained so until 2003 when the first cable-stayed bridge across the Neva was opened). Counterweights may be located above the bridge or below the deck of the bridge. There are two common designs of bascule bridge. One is the fixed-trunnion bascule design, which is where the bridge rotates around a large axle called a trunnion to raise. This bridge type is sometimes called the 'Chicago bascule' as this type was developed and perfected there and is used for many of that city's river crossings. Joseph Strauss was a key person who worked on improving the trunnion bascule bridge. Another form of bascule bridge is the Scherzer rolling lift, also known as a Rolling Bascule Bridge. The city of Joliet, Illinois has a number of this structure type. The Scherzer rolling lift bridge essentially rolls or rocks like a simple rocking chair on a track to raise. thanks.
  7. This may be of interest for the climbers out there, somewhere to practice. Sandling was once the junction for a branch line which chugged down the hill to Hythe and Sandgate, doubtless carrying many expectant holidaymakers until its closure in 1951. You can walk most of the old line all the way to hythe. The bridge is almost backfilled at the far end, and over the years has turned into a pond in a tunnel, there where even small fish in it. http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=51.088723&lon=1.069009&z=16.4&r=0&src=msl The west entrance to the tunnel: Looking in: Up on top: Looking back towards Sandling station:
  8. First report of the new year, and by gum was it worth it I'm sure some of you will recall the lengths at which I attempted to persuade my fellow Nottingham lad BravoZeRo to join me for climbing this. Not to be compared with the likes of that bloody show off Dsankt and his ridicules contribution regarding high stuff, this is a first for me... On with the pics, its basically a bridge over a railway cutting thats currently undergoing restoration. At teh bottom.. Me getting my climbing fix at last.. BravoZeRo touching the top of the arch Nearly at the top Up top Well worth the wait was great fun, can't wait to go back in the day
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