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Found 13 results

  1. Visited last summer with a couple of friends Some history Sometimes also known as the Malago Storm Water Interceptor it was built in the early 70's to help cope with the flooding problems faced in Bedminster. It is roughly 2 miles long, and runs adjacent to the Southern Foul Water Interceptor, with various overflow chambers along the way. Some pics Thanks for looking
  2. Second Visit here and second on my own, but this time the tour bus was in as there were quite a few groups on site. I spent over 3 hours here and managed to see building and other stuff I missed the last time. Not much to say about the site that's not already been said so I will get on with the photos. full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/100221036@N06/sets/72157640156724954/ That's me done, thanks for looking
  3. Bristol General has probably been an fascination of mine since I first cast my eyes on it as a young boy. It's certainly something I've wanted to explore from a UE perspective for well over 6 years and have sat patiently awaiting the end. Time went on and the place continued to operate until when about 2 years ago the NHS announced it would be sold towards the end of 2011. Finally after a long wait we made it. The history of Bristol General dates back to 1832. The lack of any health care in the growing industrial areas of Bedminster and Redclife became a concern of a local group of quakers. The Bristol General Hospital in its first incarnation, based on guinea street, provided treatment only to locals in the nearest vicinity. The introduction of the hospital was something of a ground breaking move at a time when Bristol was still a rapidly developing and changing city. While the rich lived up in the posh areas of Clifton & Redland the working/industrial persons had previously had no access to doctors or hospitals. The Bristol Riots of 1831 had provoked the demand for a better way of life. This era of massive social change was epitomised with the founding of the general hospital. The success of the early hospital brought with it the demand for a bigger hospital. In 1853 the current hospital was built. The original building had two four story blocks joined by a central tower. It featured Italianate stonework and French renaissance rooftops. Further additions were added in 1873 and 1890. Further building works were carried out in the 1930s and are generally deemed to be of poor design and not fitting in with the original character of the buildings previous. Since the 1930's the buildings have had all sorts of modifications, additions and it's the original design is almost lost amongst them all. Additional to modifications the building also suffered from extensive damage in the second world war and a number of wards are simply left as a bare shell as a result. The most telling loss of the war time era is the mansard roof that lined the Cumberland basin side of the building. The hospital was originally scheduled to close in the mid 2000's but the sudden closure of Barrow Hospital resulted in a extended lifespan and despite dates being set to close in both 2008 and 2009 it wasn't till 2011 before the hospital was sold off by the NHS. It closed its door to patients for the final time in April 2012
  4. Hello, been infiltrating for a few years! Some may recognise my name .. Been meaning to sign up to this site, just not get around to it until now
  5. Froomsgate House, Bristol It is being redeveloped into (yet more) student accommodation. This is one that a few of us (one in particular) have had our eye on for a while, so getting an invite to get up it seemed too good to miss. A mate of mine has put a lot of work into researching this one, so props to him for getting us in! Oddly, it seems I took more photos inside the building than on the roof, which is funny as it was intended as a high evening, not a derping one... There's nothing like enjoying a decent rooftop with some mates in the evening, just to get away from it all! BRISTOL MASSIVEEEE Security, or just the lift talking to itself? Just incase... Spot the noobs... Over-hanging and over-exposed...
  6. Bristol Ice Rink (John Nike Leisuresport), Bristol Visited with some of the Bristol massive! A brief summery for you: Demolition has been approved. We've been looking at this one for a while now, and this time, for the first time, it would seem luck was on our side. After a long week, this was certainly a rewarding way to end it. Think what you want of it, some would say this isn't particularly interesting and just a massive derp, but personally I found it fascinating to see and completely worth it too. Having visited the rink a couple of times when I was younger, it brought back some vague memories. The place really is in a state, but then again it was in a state before it closed and indeed for the last however many years. That being said, the people of Bristol were still very unhappy at its closure. It did seem to be attracting a large amount of visitors still, which makes you question the closure further. There is some evidence here and there of it being a cinema in its previous years, but this is mostly gone. We also found what looks like an old night club, way up in the higher level, which looks like builders briefly moved in once, set up some lights and put some office desks around, then left. I didn't take any pictures up in those parts, as we didn't fancy having to pay parking fines so had to be off. That being said, there isn't too much of interest as it's all been fairly trashed. It was still interesting to see all that above the ice rink, a place where people mostly likely haven't been for years. An interesting read from a Bristolian talking about building when it held a nightclub and a cinema too. The rink from the front, years before closure: Snapz... s
  7. So I'm new at this, any comments and tips would be greatly appreciated guys... Oh, wait, hang on... Nah, thought I'd join up here, after meaning to do so for a long time SK and everyone seems to have done a good job with the place, so keep it up guys. So HEY And on another note, if anyone is down Bristol way or new around here, feel free to get in touch and we can get something organised!
  8. I found myself in Bristol for work this week so one evening I decided to leave my hotel and go for a quick walk around this place. Despite the workmen still on site doing something to the front building and the lurkers in one part of the building banging about it was pretty mellow. Plenty of peeley paint, corridor and stair UE porno to keep even the most perverted happy. The site is massive and although I tried to get round most of it it seems from looking at others reports i might have missed some buildings. definately worth popping in if youre in the area. A bit of history..... "Barrow Hospital (sometimes referred to as Barrow Gurney Hospital) was a psychiatric hospital in Barrow Gurney, Somerset The hospital was designed by Sir George Oatley of Bristol to the then-innovative colony plan based on detached 'villas' centred around a central cluster of service buildings. The plan called for 25 villas to house 1,200 patients, treatment centres for local authority and private patients, a chapel, recreation hall, laundry and central kitchens. The buildings were austerely constructed of red brick with pantiled mansard roofs and were situated so as to give a sense of community and privacy as well as to take advantage of the wooded surroundings which were retained and enhanced by tree-thinning and landscaping. Construction began in 1934 and although the hospital was not officially opened until 3rd May 1939, Barrow Hospital received its first patients in May 1938 with the complex still only half-built. It was intended that the rest of the planned buildings should be gradually added over the following years as funds allowed, but the outbreak of war in September 1939 halted all work on site and the architect's full vision was never realised. At the outbreak of the Second World War the hospital was commandeered by the Royal Navy and became the Royal Naval Auxiliary Hospital, Barrow Gurney. The hospital treated seamen who had been injured during conflicts or who were suffering from psychological distress, brought in through the nearby Port of Bristol In 1940, the daily average number of patients under treatment was 356 and the medical and nursing staff numbered 215. The Naval Hospital was decommissioned and returned to civilian use in 1946. In 1960 the hospital's population reached a peak of 453. At this time it was predicted that new community-based care initiatives would lead to a decline in patient numbers to 200 by 1975 but in the event this target was not met. However, there was a noticeable decline in numbers during the 1970s and some residential wards were replaced with out-patient and community support services. In 2003 the Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust announced its intention to close Barrow Hospital by 2008. By 2004 only three residential wards remained open. A report published by Mind in 2003 found that on the issue of the hospital's closure, opinion among patients was divided with groups of patients having strong feelings both for and against. In 2005 a national survey of hospital cleanliness named Barrow as the dirtiest in Britain after inspectors found cigarette burns on floors, graffiti on walls, urine stains around a toilet and stains from bodily fluids on the bottom of a hoist chair. The report, combined with the collapse of part of the ceiling onto the head of a patient the same year saw the closure plan brought forward and the last ward closed the following year. After closure, the hospital attracted a variety of unofficial visitors including metal thieves, vandals and graffiti artists who contributed to the deterioration of the buildings." a few pictures from my visit.... More on my Flickr here.
  9. Derp de Derp DERRRRRRRRRPPPPPPP 2013 Derp. Not sure of demise. 2010: Derp. I had always wanted to do a pub! Sadly this one is absolutley FUBAR! Hardly any info on it, but judging by some of the expiry dates its about 2008 sometime. Place is torn apart, but has something about it. This is the last report before my tripod was terminally injured by my girlfreind who knocked it onto its side while it was open and subsequently tripped and fell onto it, so my next few reports might be a bit wonky! Good job I love her huh! Onto the pics. And Finally.... .... More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157624857037767/
  10. 2013: Not entirely sure on the status quo. 2010: History Pinched from Layz @ 28 days #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157624371589225/
  11. 2013: I have no idea the fate of this place 2010: Built in 1741, and last used in 1983, Whitfeild Tabernacle featured on Restoration in 2003. The church was used by the congregational church which is now the United Reformed. Also on the site are two other buildings, which were also used for preaching and also accomodation. There has been an arson attack in the past. More at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157623894520960/
  12. Barrow Hospital (sometimes referred to as Barrow Gurney Hospital) was a psychiatric hospital in Barrow Gurney, Somerset The hospital was designed by Sir George Oatley of Bristol to the then-innovative colony plan based on detached 'villas' centred around a central cluster of service buildings. The plan called for 25 villas to house 1,200 patients, treatment centres for local authority and private patients, a chapel, recreation hall, laundry and central kitchens. The buildings were austerely constructed of red brick with pantiled mansard roofs and were situated so as to give a sense of community and privacy as well as to take advantage of the wooded surroundings which were retained and enhanced by tree-thinning and landscaping. Construction began in 1934 and although the hospital was not officially opened until 3rd May 1939, Barrow Hospital received its first patients in May 1938 with the complex still only half-built. It was intended that the rest of the planned buildings should be gradually added over the following years as funds allowed, but the outbreak of war in September 1939 halted all work on site and the architect's full vision was never realised. At the outbreak of the Second World War the hospital was commandeered by the Royal Navy and became the Royal Naval Auxiliary Hospital, Barrow Gurney. The hospital treated seamen who had been injured during conflicts or who were suffering from psychological distress, brought in through the nearby Port of Bristol In 1940, the daily average number of patients under treatment was 356 and the medical and nursing staff numbered 215. The Naval Hospital was decommissioned and returned to civilian use in 1946. In 1960 the hospital's population reached a peak of 453. At this time it was predicted that new community-based care initiatives would lead to a decline in patient numbers to 200 by 1975 but in the event this target was not met. However, there was a noticeable decline in numbers during the 1970s and some residential wards were replaced with out-patient and community support services. In 2003 the Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust announced its intention to close Barrow Hospital by 2008. By 2004 only three residential wards remained open. A report published by Mind in 2003 found that on the issue of the hospital's closure, opinion among patients was divided with groups of patients having strong feelings both for and against. In 2005 a national survey of hospital cleanliness named Barrow as the dirtiest in Britain after inspectors found cigarette burns on floors, graffiti on walls, urine stains around a toilet and stains from bodily fluids on the bottom of a hoist chair. The report, combined with the collapse of part of the ceiling onto the head of a patient the same year saw the closure plan brought forward and the last ward closed the following year. After closure, the hospital attracted a variety of unofficial visitors including metal thieves, vandals and graffiti artists who contributed to the deterioration of the buildings. , , , ,
  13. visited with obscurity and Mrs obs ... a little history ... The hospital was first built between 1934-1937 with the first patients being admitted in 1938. Barrow was built in a more modern style than the nearby Bristol Mental Asylum - The Glenside, which was a huge imposing Victorian building built in the 1850's. Barrow was made up of lots of smaller buildings in a colony style.During World War II the hospital was requisitioned by the British government as use as a Naval Hospital. In 1946 the Navy left and the hospital finally reverted back to its intentional use in late 1948... on with the pics .. thanks for looking
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